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L2 Charger Question

Discussion in 'Charging Standards and Infrastructure' started by Face_Disguise, Mar 21, 2016.

  1. Face_Disguise

    Face_Disguise Member

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    Hi all,

    I just moved into a new apartment building, and they have two Leviton L2 Chargers in the parking garage, and no electric vehicles owned by anyone in the building - I'm hoping to be the first with Model 3!

    My question - how many miles per hour can I expect to get from one of these chargers?

    I attached a photo of the details on the side of the charger - looks like they are 240v / 16 amp?
     

    Attached Files:

  2. glenhurst

    glenhurst Member

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    I think you'll typically get 14-18 miles of range per hour of charging. Charging overnight should be no problem. Every morning you'll wake up to a full battery.
     
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  3. Face_Disguise

    Face_Disguise Member

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    Brilliant, thanks!
     
  4. nwdiver

    nwdiver Active Member

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    If your building gets 3 phase you'll be 208v vs 240v. 16 amps @ 208 is 3.3kW. That's ~10 miles/hr. Still fine for overnight... that's what I'm getting right now at my hotel...
     
  5. CLLACAB

    CLLACAB Member

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    I have a Bosch Powermax and get about 20 miles per hour of charge.
     
  6. nwdiver

    nwdiver Active Member

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    It took me a while to understand why 208 was 208 and 240 was 240; Basically in a residential system you're splitting 1 phase 180 degrees. So the peak voltage difference between L1 and L2 will be 240. Most commercial buildings receive 3 phase power. For '240v' applications they use L1 & L2 or L2 & L3 or L3 & L1. The voltage difference between any phase and ground will be ~120v just like split-phase residential. BUT; the phase difference between L1 and L2 isn't 180 degrees... it's 120. So the voltage difference will be ~208v not ~240. The connector can only give you what's available...
     
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  7. BrokerDon

    BrokerDon Member

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  8. TexasEV

    TexasEV Active Member

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    That's what is expected from a typical public 30A J1772. The OP said the charging station he has access to is only 16A, so it would be about half the rate.
     
  9. FlasherZ

    FlasherZ Sig Model S + Sig Model X + Model 3 Resv

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    Actually, that isn't quite accurate but it's close.

    The power company could give you lots of different voltages, it's just down to the service that they can deliver, sell and you can use. Technically, in a three-phase installation, they could offer you 120V *and* 240V, it's just that it comes with some restrictions or power balancing issues.

    For example, some older commercial installations offer split-phase delta service on three phase. 120V is provided by grounding a transformer center tap from L1-L3 on a 240V delta configuation (where L1-L2, L2-L3, and L3-L1 are all 240V). This works for smaller installations, but runs into some issues in that 120V loads are concentrated on only one of the phases and you can have significant imbalance on L1-L2 and L2-L3. This is also the source of a lot of handyman boo-boos as the voltage between ground/neutral and L2 is 208V (the "high leg" or "stinger").

    The reason that 208Y120V is pretty much standard and popular is that the neutral/ground is located in the "center" and 120V loads can be balanced across any of the phases; switching power supplies have made it easier to attach electronics to nearly any voltage; and resistive loads are easy to adjust for 208 operation.

    I'd probably argue the semantics of saying that split-phase is splitting 1 phase 180 degrees, because it really doesn't reflect what's happening if you consider power in the context of phase windings in a turbine generator. But you're close enough that it's not completely incorrect, either.
     

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