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Lack of an instrument panel, force 8K upgrades

Will you get both upgrades?

  • Yes

    Votes: 23 29.5%
  • No

    Votes: 32 41.0%
  • At a later time

    Votes: 23 29.5%

  • Total voters
    78

JeffK

Well-Known Member
Apr 27, 2016
6,997
6,932
Indianapolis
False. Properly designed physical buttons in high end cars are easily differentiated by location and feel alone.

I find the Tesla touchscreen UI to be dangerous. Basic functions require a glance at the screen. The only viable alternatives are multitouch gesture controls or voice recognition.
Only if you've memorized their locations. On my prius they made certain physical buttons have bumps because it's hard to tell which is which without looking at it. Probably 90% of the time I have to look at it anyway.

100% of the time I'm looking when I hit a physical button near the center display of my Prius.
 

Az_Rael

Well-Known Member
Supporting Member
Jan 26, 2016
5,682
8,990
Palmdale, CA
The above post boggles my mind. There is no need to say "Maybe even less eye travel than down and through the steering wheel". You are using your imagination, and no one needs to sit in a Model 3 to wish otherwise. And, like I'm saying, it isn't enough that eye-stealing touch screens are moving right. Buyers may be faced with dog-tricks, to do what a flick with the left arm did in a split second.

Have you ever driven a center speedo Prius? I rented one for a trip once. Took about a day to get used to it, then I never thought about it again the whole trip. It was perfectly fine.

Sometimes I have to duck my head to see the full binnacle screen and I have been known to have my brights on accidentally because that icon is behind the wheel with my driving position. So in some ways having the info on the right may be better.


As far as the minimal buttons design - yah, that ain't great. Tesla did a pretty good job of putting everything you need while driving accessible from the scroll wheels, but there are somethings I do have to dive into the menus for (mostly climate controls). I would like a physical homelink button, but their solution of having it pop to the top when you pull into your driveway works pretty well. I wish voice control could access my USB music - that would reduce a lot of menu dives as well.

But, frankly my Gen 1 Volt had a worse user interface since it was a shotgun blast of touch chiclets that had several never used functions assigned to a button, but common things like "now playing" involved a menu dive.
 
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EchoDelta

Active Member
Supporting Member
Generalization isn't useful.:confused:

it is only a couple controls one truly needs split second, no-fuss access to: wipers, hazard lights, horn, etc.
I recently counted the buttons on my MB *drivers door*. Rear view mirror positions, seat positions, windows controls x 4, window lock, lock/unlock, memorize/recall for seat and mirror positions, and minor stuff- of which 90% could be relegated to a center screen. I've pressed some of those buttons less than a dozen times- by design- in all the years i've had the car.
And don't get me started on the center console of the MB. Numeric Dialing pad... really? 12 buttons right there, not one has been pressed, ever.
 
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3mp_kwh

Active Member
Feb 13, 2013
1,146
337
Boston
Have you ever driven a center speedo Prius? I rented one for a trip once. Took about a day to get used to it, then I never thought about it again the whole trip. It was perfectly fine.

Sometimes I have to duck my head to see the full binnacle screen and I have been known to have my brights on accidentally because that icon is behind the wheel with my driving position. So in some ways having the info on the right may be better.


As far as the minimal buttons design - yah, that ain't great. Tesla did a pretty good job of putting everything you need while driving accessible from the scroll wheels, but there are somethings I do have to dive into the menus for (mostly climate controls). I would like a physical homelink button, but their solution of having it pop to the top when you pull into your driveway works pretty well. I wish voice control could access my USB music - that would reduce a lot of menu dives as well.

But, frankly my Gen 1 Volt had a worse user interface since it was a shotgun blast of touch chiclets that had several never used functions assigned to a button, but common things like "now playing" involved a menu dive.

I knew there was one left side stalk, and am happy to be corrected that it's for wipers. Model S has three (AWD, onward) if you count AP, steering wheel adjust and wiper/turn signal. So, between that and images from the handover event showing something to do with wipers on the touchscreen (they're out there, I think covered by IEV).

Nothing beats the test drive. I made a recent video the other day, of why changing a media selection can be tricky, on MS. It's not up, yet, but shows the jockeying necessary to restore a web page top, nav bottom appearance. 6 strikes of the touch screen. Scroll wheel is problematic when pre-sets include web streamed stations, as they bog. That, and sometimes you want to make a selection that isn't preset. Anyway, the media center isn't vital, just less convenient. The scroll wheels are already way too busy, like setting a watch to hold for a couple seconds, scroll, select, and functionally abandon the immediate access you had to something else, which on another car isn't on the SW. There's a trade-off, at some point, between keeping hands on the wheel, and the net time you've looked away from the road to see what you are menu'ing through.

I always enjoyed the volume dial, on my Volt. Chevy listened w/Volt 2, and separated out the HVAC controls from the center stack touch screen. I'm sure I'd have liked those dials, too. Tesla took media controls away, from the upper touch screen when you're using NAV. It's just an extra tap and second, as they animate down, but it was like something almost nobody asked for (to have ~1.5" more map displayed w/o even the map's "+" "-" controls). Worse, it was by "update". So, my concern somewhat stands, that Tesla is pushing so hard to foster the image these cars are Level 5, that some ergonomic hang-ups may worsen. Putting the speed in the upper left hand corner, of the 15"/ Model 3, was sort of a capitulation in itself. The best they could do, given where the screen was moved.

Maybe not a deal-breaker, but I share others concerns.
 
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False. Properly designed physical buttons in high end cars are easily differentiated by location and feel alone.

I find the Tesla touchscreen UI to be dangerous. Basic functions require a glance at the screen. The only viable alternatives are multitouch gesture controls or voice recognition.

So don't buy the car? Not liking certain things is one thing. If you really think the car is a safety hazard you shouldn't get it. I personally think it's ridiculous, and don't for one second think you actually drive without ever glancing away from the road to adjust the radio, air conditioning, etc. But whatever, let's say you actually don't. Just don't buy the car.
 
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BluestarE3

Active Member
Apr 2, 2016
4,088
5,216
Norcal
I find it a bit interesting how people are freaking out over features of a car, and talking about order cancellations, without a test drive at least.
And a few months from now, some who had impulsively canceled will complain bitterly that, had Tesla revealed more information or made demo cars available sooner, they wouldn't have canceled and wouldn't be facing 2019 delivery dates upon placing new reservations... and that Tesla should give them special dispensation on the re-reservations because they had originally stood in line back on 3/31/2016. ;)
 

aronth5

Long Time Follower
Supporting Member
May 8, 2010
3,740
3,846
Boston Suburb
The problem with the OPS question is whether I spend $8k has absolutely nothing to do with the lack of an "instrument panel". From my perspective they are simply options not upgrades.
I own a Prius V with a HUD and I keep wondering why people ask where the HUD is? The 15" display is the HUD.
I mean doesn't heads up describe how I will view the top left hand portion of the monitor?
 
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MXWing

Well-Known Member
Oct 13, 2016
7,748
24,192
USA
So this is my first post so take it easy on me.

I am wanting to get people's opinion on what they think about the lack of instrument panel .

From Elon "You won't care" Well that is true if the car is driving me to my destination but it is not true if I do not purchase the advance autopilot features and then it cannot drive me to and from. Maybe it is something that I will just need to get use to and find out once I am in the car I truly do not care.

Note: I am still very excited to get the Model 3

Occam's razor should tell you that since non of the test drivers complained about the lack of instrument panel -

It's not the concern you think it is.

You've made a post talking to people who have NOT driven the Model 3 and trying to get cons when the people who HAVE driven it don't mention it.

I have expectations thread #2 from you will be of higher quality. :)
 
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3mp_kwh

Active Member
Feb 13, 2013
1,146
337
Boston
Occam's razor should tell you that since non of the test drivers complained about the lack of instrument panel - It's not the concern you think it is.
clip_image001.png

Attendees at the delivery party were mostly in the back, and “In the Tank”.

The 15" display is the HUD.

Heads Over Display = the HOD. Small correction, further away from driver’s field of view.

I never touch my screen while I'm driving.
I use the buttons on steering wheel

Congratulations, but I've had no luck with voice commands and people are going to use these screens. It may not come down to immediate safety controls, or driving inputs. It may come down to dislocating what people will want to spend time on. It gets progressively less safe to look further away from above the steering wheel, and to do it for the greater amount of time a touch screen requires. AP is a perfect example. Stationary offset objects in your path are a liability everyone needs to monitor, as has been demonstrated. A jersey barrier sticking out into the high speed lane can be a problem, if your head is to the right. Model 3 may, but I don't expect will, see this. So, the less we need to visually build triangles, the better.
 
You've made a post talking to people who have NOT driven the Model 3 and trying to get cons when the people who HAVE driven it don't mention it.

I have expectations thread #2 from you will be of higher quality.

MXWing I will try to do better on my next one :)

I think my overall point has been missed. I do not have a concern on safety nor am I concerned on the simplicity of the design but I have the suspicion that the way the car was designed was meant for people either now or down the road will eventually have to get the 8K upgrades. I know it may not be forced and I can be totally off base it is just my thought. Like you mentioned no one except for a few have truly driven the car and I maybe I am over stating my concern.
 

Mr X

Active Member
Jan 18, 2013
2,417
2,924
1 AU
False. Properly designed physical buttons in high end cars are easily differentiated by location and feel alone.

I find the Tesla touchscreen UI to be dangerous. Basic functions require a glance at the screen. The only viable alternatives are multitouch gesture controls or voice recognition.


Don't see how you perceive a still sitting screen as dangerous. It's just there, mounted, doing absolutely nothing, causing no harm. And you don't even need to use the screen in a Tesla to drive

It's simple to use. Every human gets use to things in their life. Something new to get use to if you already aren't. Bye bye buttons
 

GeekGirls

Kid in Candy Store
Dec 30, 2012
312
93
Seattle
False. Properly designed physical buttons in high end cars are easily differentiated by location and feel alone.

I find the Tesla touchscreen UI to be dangerous. Basic functions require a glance at the screen. The only viable alternatives are multitouch gesture controls or voice recognition.

Out of curiosity: do you find the touchscreen UI dangerous in theory, or have you spent much time driving a Tesla? We own two vehicles, and I find myself spending far more time focused on how to interact with the physical controls on our i3 than I do with the touchscreen counterparts on our Model S. As another poster pointed out, I tend to glance toward just about any control I’m interacting with, virtual or physical, so the real measure of safety for me is how long I’m distracted. The Tesla UI almost invariably lets me get the job done faster with less distraction.

It doesn’t help that the voice-activated navigation in the i3 requires very specific grammar and almost invariably assumes I’m trying to drive across the country when I try to dictate a destination. Perhaps we’re just not compatible.
 

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