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Lack of external noise and safety

nxsynjs

Member
Jul 5, 2020
258
204
UK
How do people handle the lack of noise from the car when coming up behind pedestrians, cyclists etc. I hold back and go really slowly until I am confident there is more than enough room to pass. But pretty often said cyclist or pedestrian has no idea I am there and so will continue in the middle of the road.

I have been wondering if I should use the horn to let them know there is a car there, BUT beeping someone in the UK is seen more of an aggressive act than a simple "hey be careful there's someone behind you". So the last thing I was is to provoke an aggressive reaction from someone I am trying to help.

Not looking on this becoming an cyclist vs car thread but rather how us as those in control of something that can injure or kill people can best protect those who may be unaware of us
 
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Adopado

Active Member
Aug 19, 2019
3,794
2,906
Scotland
When approaching cyclists on the open road I make sure not to slow down too early ... it's only when going slowly that there is a danger of the cyclist or walker not hearing your approach. The tire noise above 30mph from any car, even electric, is very noticeable. There are plenty of very quiet ICE cars that are not much different. The only time I am aware of being not noticed is if rolling along at 10mph or manoeuvring in car parks but I've had people not notice me in an ICE car in those situations too. If very close then an "excuse me" out of the window works. If needing to resort to the horn then a short sharp "bip" might be necessary but I can't even remember having to do that.
 
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adsheff

Member
Sep 9, 2019
293
281
UK
In Sheffield the trams (which share the roads with cars, bikes and pedestrians) have two horns - one is a friendly sounding bell that they ting every now and then to let people know they're coming. The other is a full on horn which they use if someone is about to get run over. I think two different horns might be a good idea on a car.

That aside, you should never pass a person on foot or on a bike unless there is ample room anyway. I only pass a person on a bike if I can move fully over onto the other side of the road, I only pass closer if going 10mph or less. A bike can be easily blown by the wind or swerve to avoid a pothole/drain cover, so you need to give plenty of room when passing.
 

Glan gluaisne

Supporting Member
Sep 11, 2019
2,782
2,708
UK
I chatted to a registered blind neighbour about this over a year ago. Her view was that she never hears the engines of cars going slowly anyway, all she hears is the tyre noise, as cars are generally all very quiet at low speeds. She did say her guide dog always heard my car (at that time an i3) long before she did, and she didn't think it was any quieter than the Prius I had before that. Not had a chance to talk to her about the Model 3, but my guess is that it makes at least as much noise as the i3 did.
 

Tony Hoyle

Active Member
May 7, 2019
1,067
650
Stockport, UK
I think dogs can hear the motor whine more than humans - I've observed it driving down our street, where the dogs have reacted long before children playing in the street etc.
 

freekie

Member
Sep 10, 2019
259
108
UK
I only pass when I can make lots of space between them and my car. I occasionally cycle and it’s horrible when any vehicle passes too close regardless of noise. Try and imagine you are the cyclist and how much space you would like. A honk would scare me if I was cycling.
 
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Ticked

Member
Jan 25, 2020
16
6
Kent
I think dogs can hear the motor whine more than humans - I've observed it driving down our street, where the dogs have reacted long before children playing in the street etc.
I can confirm my dog has worked out when we are going out in the car as opposed to walking out from the house. She knows if the car is pre-warming and waits for me to open the door for her.

Generally, I can confirm that the sound of the tyres is very audible to pedestrians and perhaps would only not be heard by those walking or running while wearing headphones.
 

pdk42

Active Member
Jul 17, 2019
1,071
1,048
Leamington
I know someone with an EV who bought a wireless door "bell" (actually an electronic one with a choice of chimes). He mounted the main unit with speaker in the frunk and kept the button unit in the car. An "interesting" solution. Another idea (totally my own!) would be to fit an ice cream van music player!
 

MacPaul

Member
Sep 28, 2019
164
137
Aberdeen
Tyre/engine noise can be drowned out by the wind when you’re cycling fast so a loud noise behind you is surprising. It’s a natural reaction to ‘jump’ at unexpected loud noises. Not pleasant when your cycling at speed.
 

Winner365

Member
Nov 2, 2020
24
11
Newcastle
In Sheffield the trams (which share the roads with cars, bikes and pedestrians) have two horns - one is a friendly sounding bell that they ting every now and then to let people know they're coming. The other is a full on horn which they use if someone is about to get run over. I think two different horns might be a good idea on a car.

That aside, you should never pass a person on foot or on a bike unless there is ample room anyway. I only pass a person on a bike if I can move fully over onto the other side of the road, I only pass closer if going 10mph or less. A bike can be easily blown by the wind or swerve to avoid a pothole/drain cover, so you need to give plenty of room when passing.

As a cyclist I get frustrated by cars not passing when there is ample room. Not because the driver behind me is being overly cautious, but more so because the drivers behind them get frustrated that they aren’t overtaking when their IS room and so will overtake when it’s ‘their turn’ - often when there isn’t space, but they’ll do it anyway because they have been held up.

Please over take when their is space. You don’t have to go across to the other side of the road completely for it to be safe.

Just my two cents though
 

Drew57

Active ember
Apr 4, 2020
1,060
1,255
Chester UK
There are several Model 3s, an X and an S near where I live & when out walking, one or more often passes.

My wife has commented that at 30mph or less, a Tesla sounds virtually identical to most other cars, just road noise & it's only at very slow speeds where extra vigilance is required (ie turning in to a side road with distracted pedestrians about to cross or in a car park etc).
 

Glan gluaisne

Supporting Member
Sep 11, 2019
2,782
2,708
UK
When I bought my first Prius, in 2005, there was a significant problem with people walking in front of, or behind, the car, as I was driving out of parking spaces (at low speeds even the older hybrid Prius ran in EV mode most of the time). Supermarket car parks were the worst, perhaps because of the added noise of trolleys. I didn't really notice any problems on roads, even slow lanes through villages, with pedestrians around.

Over time, this problem seemed to pretty much go away, I think because people just became far more aware of newer cars being near-silent at low speeds. I can't say I've noticed any problems at all over the last few years, although there are always one or two people around who seem to have as much road sense as a pheasant.
 

SpareHeadOne

Member
Oct 27, 2020
305
185
UK
As a cyclist I get frustrated by cars not passing when there is ample room. Not because the driver behind me is being overly cautious, but more so because the drivers behind them get frustrated that they aren’t overtaking when their IS room and so will overtake when it’s ‘their turn’ - often when there isn’t space, but they’ll do it anyway because they have been held up.

Please over take when their is space. You don’t have to go across to the other side of the road completely for it to be safe.

Just my two cents though

Since March this year you can be fined (up to £100) for not leaving at least 1.5m when passing a cyclist so you do have to go onto the other side of the road when you're sharing a lane.
 
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