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[Leak - Not Accurate] Tesla Launches Supercharger Membership for Non-Tesla Vehicles at $0.99/month

RTPEV

Active Member
Mar 21, 2016
1,835
2,475
Durham, NC
These subsidies go to people who already can afford these vehicles without subsidies. Put grants into low income and rural communities. The areas of Kentucky that flooded are mostly poor rural areas. Some Homes don't have indoor plumbing let alone A/C and heat their Homes with wood burning stoves in winter because they can't afford to turn up the thermostat. There are areas all over the country that are like this. This is where this money should be going. Where are the Green jobs in Coal country to replace the Coal Natural gas and Oil jobs?
I'll tell you what...sitting back and just assuming that coal jobs are going to be around forever is not a good strategy either. Politicians who say they are going to "fight for coal" drive me nuts. They are doing their communities a disservice by not actively encouraging a transition to other industry. Regardless of any environmental or political reasons, the pure economics of coal are going to mean the end of the coal industry. True leaders need to start now to reinvent communities that are highly dependent on the coal industry.

So where might those oil & gas jobs wind up? How about large scale compressed (liquid) air storage facilities, which tend to use a lot of the skills present in the oil & gas industry? Or geothermal? Or something completely different. Those areas are probably already too late in transitioning: nobody new should have been entering the coal mining industry for the past decade, knowing the writing is on the wall. But politicians have given coal mining communities false hope and yes, now they are totally screwed.
 

DrGriz

Active Member
Sep 11, 2021
1,376
1,910
Idaho
I'll tell you what...sitting back and just assuming that coal jobs are going to be around forever is not a good strategy either. Politicians who say they are going to "fight for coal" drive me nuts. They are doing their communities a disservice by not actively encouraging a transition to other industry. Regardless of any environmental or political reasons, the pure economics of coal are going to mean the end of the coal industry. True leaders need to start now to reinvent communities that are highly dependent on the coal industry.

So where might those oil & gas jobs wind up? How about large scale compressed (liquid) air storage facilities, which tend to use a lot of the skills present in the oil & gas industry? Or geothermal? Or something completely different. Those areas are probably already too late in transitioning: nobody new should have been entering the coal mining industry for the past decade, knowing the writing is on the wall. But politicians have given coal mining communities false hope and yes, now they are totally screwed.
Ole King Coal is dying. He was never going to last the long run. :cool:
 
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Tesla supercharger network is one of the biggest benefits of owning a Tesla and is significantly larger than any other fast-charging network in the US. However, the network can get congested at times, and it's unclear what will happen if more EVs are added to it.should only add 3&5 new installation with ccs adapters or limited the non tesla Ev time to charging like after midnight,or daytime limit 30 mins charging only,Not any tesla owner like more crowded ! Electrify America Charging Station.the picture attached below ,taken by 8/19/2022, all non tesla owners know about this experience!
 

Big Earl

bnkwupt
Supporting Member
Jul 12, 2017
7,873
15,816
La Conner, WA
Tesla's mission: to accelerate the world's transition to sustainable energy.

If you want something done right, you have to do it yourself. Electrify America is falling short of expectations and is possibly more of a drag on - than an enabler of - EV adoption. In order to keep the mission on track, Tesla will step up to provide public charging.

This is going to add quite a bit of load, but if you check the stats on supercharge.info, you'll see that Tesla's network buildout is rapidly accelerating. So far this month, Tesla has started construction on 291 Supercharger stalls across 24 sites in the United States. With each passing month, Tesla partners with new businesses, enabling even faster expansion. I'm sure we'll have some teething pains as Tesla rolls out charging for other EVs, but I'm confident that we'll get past it and end up in a much better place.
 
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Tesla's mission: to accelerate the world's transition to sustainable energy.

If you want something done right, you have to do it yourself. Electrify America is falling short of expectations and is possibly more of a drag on - than an enabler of - EV adoption. In order to keep the mission on track, Tesla will step up to provide public charging.

This is going to add quite a bit of load, but if you check the stats on supercharge.info, you'll see that Tesla's network buildout is rapidly accelerating. So far this month, Tesla has started construction on 291 Supercharger stalls across 24 sites in the United States. With each passing month, Tesla partners with new businesses, enabling even faster expansion. I'm sure we'll have some teething pains as Tesla rolls out charging for other EVs, but I'm confident that we'll get past it and end up in a much better place.
Let's be real.

Tesla's mission is to make money for Tesla's stockholders.
 

MP3Mike

Well-Known Member
Feb 1, 2016
19,884
49,696
Oregon
With Tesla close to launching this pilot program, shouldn't there be reporting coming in from people that some Superchargers have been retrofitted with CCS?
What makes you think that they are close to launching it? (Because of a software leak?)

For example the leak of the P100D was in March, but it wasn't actually released until August.
 
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I'm not sure what your point with that video is. But it isn't Tesla's responsibility to fix broken Honda software/hardware. (Which of course we don't know if the problem is on Tesla's side or Honda's side.)
  1. How do you know that it is Honda's fault?
  2. Honda couldn't possibly have tested for compatibility because the Honda E came out before Tesla opened the Supercharger to non-Tesla vehicles.
 

MP3Mike

Well-Known Member
Feb 1, 2016
19,884
49,696
Oregon
How do you know that it is Honda's fault?
I literally said that we don't know... But given that I haven't heard of any other vehicles with compatibility issues it is a fair assumption.

Also, the fact that some people have reported that it disables all DC charging on the Honda leads me to think that Honda's software, or hardware, is broken.
 
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I literally said that we don't know... But given that I haven't heard of any other vehicles with compatibility issues it is a fair assumption.

Also, the fact that some people have reported that it disables all DC charging on the Honda leads me to think that Honda's software, or hardware, is broken.
Hyundai Ioniq, Kona, and Kia Niro EV are incompatible
 

MP3Mike

Well-Known Member
Feb 1, 2016
19,884
49,696
Oregon
Hyundai Ioniq, Kona, and Kia Niro EV are incompatible
Seems like more false information from you. Surprise! :eek: :rolleyes:

Here is a video showing a Hyundai Kona charging at both a V2 and V3 Supercharger about 8 months ago:


Here is a video showing a Kia Niro charging at a Supercharger from about a year ago:


I did see where the Hyundai Ionic 5 and Kia EV6 were incompatible at first; rumor is because of some problem with their 400 to 800 volt process. But Tesla quickly provided an update to the Superchargers to make it work. (But from what I have seen a result of Tesla's work-around to the Hyundai/Kia problem is that it charges slower than it could possibly otherwise.)
 
Seems like more false information from you. Surprise! :eek: :rolleyes:

Here is a video showing a Hyundai Kona charging at both a V2 and V3 Supercharger about 8 months ago:


Here is a video showing a Kia Niro charging at a Supercharger from about a year ago:


I did see where the Hyundai Ionic 5 and Kia EV6 were incompatible at first; rumor is because of some problem with their 400 to 800 volt process. But Tesla quickly provided an update to the Superchargers to make it work. (But from what I have seen a result of Tesla's work-around to the Hyundai/Kia problem is that it charges slower than it could possibly otherwise.)
 
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MP3Mike

Well-Known Member
Feb 1, 2016
19,884
49,696
Oregon
OK, Ionic does have issues. But the video title is incorrect, people even commented on it saying that the Niro was fine. (Just like the video I found.)

So now, who's fault is it? Did either Tesla or Hyundai fail to follow the standard? (Or maybe the standard doesn't cover that dimension and they both meet the standard, which would be example of how bad the CCS standard is.)

It would seem that it is likely Hyundai's fault as the Ionic runs into the same problem at Kempower chargers.
 
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RTPEV

Active Member
Mar 21, 2016
1,835
2,475
Durham, NC
  1. How do you know that it is Honda's fault?
  2. Honda couldn't possibly have tested for compatibility because the Honda E came out before Tesla opened the Supercharger to non-Tesla vehicles.
First, a favor: when you simply post a link to a video, could you at least post a one to two sentence summary of what the video is about or the point you hope it to make? I watched the entire video hoping to eventually get to a point I imagined you were trying to make, and even at 2X it was frustratingly tedious. Watching the guy start off the video by walking around his car and filming the site for about 5 minutes before even getting to his "test", was bad enough. Then we had to watch while he went back and forth to his car because he couldn't have his phone in his hand outside? Anyway...

While we don't know it's the Honda's fault, whose fault it is, or even the fact that you dug up a video showing a particular brand/model EV not able to charge at a European site isn't relevant to the point originally being made (which is that you thought that there would be some early field testing of non-Tesla vehicles at public US Supercharger sites).

Your second point is also a non sequitur. Are you trying to imply that the onus is on Tesla to open up public CCS sites as part of a testing regimen so that owners (or manufacturers) of non-Tesla vehicles will show up and test them out? That's the only way I can possibly think to tie this comment back to the original discussion.

If it's more of a general comment though, the onus is not on Tesla to prove compatibility with every make and model out there. Nonetheless, why does the fact that the Honda E came out before Tesla opened the Supercharger to non-Tesla vehicles imply that Honda couldn't have tested for compatibility, at least during the pilot program? I'm not sure they would be bothered until they received customer reports that they were not able to charge.
 
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First, a favor: when you simply post a link to a video, could you at least post a one to two sentence summary of what the video is about or the point you hope it to make? I watched the entire video hoping to eventually get to a point I imagined you were trying to make, and even at 2X it was frustratingly tedious. Watching the guy start off the video by walking around his car and filming the site for about 5 minutes before even getting to his "test", was bad enough. Then we had to watch while he went back and forth to his car because he couldn't have his phone in his hand outside? Anyway...

While we don't know it's the Honda's fault, whose fault it is, or even the fact that you dug up a video showing a particular brand/model EV not able to charge at a European site isn't relevant to the point originally being made (which is that you thought that there would be some early field testing of non-Tesla vehicles at public US Supercharger sites).

Your second point is also a non sequitur. Are you trying to imply that the onus is on Tesla to open up public CCS sites as part of a testing regimen so that owners (or manufacturers) of non-Tesla vehicles will show up and test them out? That's the only way I can possibly think to tie this comment back to the original discussion.

If it's more of a general comment though, the onus is not on Tesla to prove compatibility with every make and model out there. Nonetheless, why does the fact that the Honda E came out before Tesla opened the Supercharger to non-Tesla vehicles imply that Honda couldn't have tested for compatibility, at least during the pilot program? I'm not sure they would be bothered until they received customer reports that they were not able to charge.
Since I am in North America, I will give you an example of Electrify America.

Electrify America has a lab called the Center of Excellence where automakers can send pre-production to Electrify America for testing.

Now, the Honda e was released back in 2020.

Tesla didn't even express its intention to open the Supercharger to non-Tesla until sometime in 2021, so Honda wouldn't have sent a pre-production Honda e to Tesla for testing before the Honda e was released. (Honda had no reason to.)

Knowing Tesla, I wouldn't be surprised if Tesla did minimal internal testing before rolling out the program to the public for testing.

Also, I don't know what you mean when you said "Honda couldn't have tested for compatibility, at least during the pilot program". The pilot program is right now. Tesla even called it the "Non-Tesla Supercharger Pilot" (Non-Tesla Supercharger Pilot)
 

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