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Level 1, 2, and 3 charge times?

Discussion in 'Model S: Battery & Charging' started by theslimshadyist, Oct 23, 2016.

  1. theslimshadyist

    theslimshadyist NashVegas!

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    Hey all,

    Can someone with knowledge and experience help me better understand the charge times for level 1, 2, and 3 chargers?
     
  2. TexasEV

    TexasEV Well-Known Member

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    Take a look at this and then come back with a specific question.
    Tesla Charging | Tesla
    Level 2 just means 240V but could be anywhere from 20 to 72A.
     
    • Informative x 1
  3. Saghost

    Saghost Active Member

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    Level 1: days
    Level 2: hours
    Level 3: minutes

    As TexasEV said, it's a broad subject with a number of details that matter so we need a clearer question to give more answer than that.
     
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  4. theslimshadyist

    theslimshadyist NashVegas!

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    Ok, let me be more specific as it relates to the following. I see a lot of destination chargers that have both CHADeMO DCFC and J1772. Trying to figure out the difference in charging speeds between these 2.
     
  5. Saghost

    Saghost Active Member

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    J1772 includes a lot of possibilities, but I believe the most common public charger is 30A, 208V - about 6 kW. The fastest J1772 is 80A at 240V, 19.2 kW, but only upgraded Tesla cars can take advantage of that rate in the U.S. (J1772 is a fancy extension cord that passes AC power to the car and the car's built in charger converts to DC.)

    CHAdeMO is capable of up to 50kW, in the real world it is often 40-45 kW unless you happen to be at one of the 24kW stations from BMW or Nissan. CHAdeMO has a big converter box in the charge station and feeds the car directly with high voltage DC, bypassing the car's built in charger.
     
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  6. theslimshadyist

    theslimshadyist NashVegas!

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    So, I can plug into a J1772 without an adapter as opposed to CHAdeMO, correct?
     
  7. Saghost

    Saghost Active Member

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    A Tesla needs an adapter for either, but the J1772 is a dumb adapter (as in no electronics, it just changes the physical shape of the plug) that's included with every car.

    The CHAdeMO adapter is a substantial piece with its own firmware and a $450 price tag, bought separately.
     
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  8. theslimshadyist

    theslimshadyist NashVegas!

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    Got it and thanks again for the wonderful educational overview!
     
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  9. TexasEV

    TexasEV Well-Known Member

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    Most public J1772 stations such as ChargePoint or Blink networks are 30A and will give a Model S about 18 miles of rated range per hour. CHAdeMO is about 1/3 to 1/2 the speed of a Tesla supercharger, depending on your state of charge it will be about 100 miles rated range per hour. But most of them shut off after 30 minutes and you have to pay for another session.
     
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  10. goneskiian

    goneskiian Active Member

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