TMC is an independent, primarily volunteer organization that relies on ad revenue to cover its operating costs. Please consider whitelisting TMC on your ad blocker or making a Paypal contribution here: paypal.me/SupportTMC

Lots of LEDs

Discussion in 'Model S: User Interface' started by AC1K, Sep 21, 2013.

  1. AC1K

    AC1K Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2013
    Messages:
    468
    Location:
    Calgary Alberta Canada
    Im Suprised the leds are bright enough to light up an entire parking lot thats pitch black.

    if you set your lights to "Parking" the LED DRLs get twice as bright compared to headlight mode but you loose your turning LEDs.

    i pulled the fuse for the headlight to see if the DRLs are bright enough and it works pretty good, what they lack in throw they make up for in flood.

    jzdNu6B.jpg
    TCOTToZ.jpg
    ZK7pUwj.jpg

    edit: oops i posted on the wrong subsection, please move to interior exterior
     
  2. MarkR

    MarkR Member

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2012
    Messages:
    893
    Location:
    N. Scottsdale, AZ
    LED lights have come a long way. They seem to last forever, draw little current, and can put out a massive amount of lumens.
     
  3. JohnQ

    JohnQ Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2012
    Messages:
    1,585
    Location:
    Redding, CT
    And they're finally cheap, too.
     
  4. PhilBa

    PhilBa Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2013
    Messages:
    1,355
    Location:
    Seattle
    semi-off topic, I just finished a kitchen remodel and am using only LEDs for the lighting. Really lights up the kitchen in a warm, natural light and, at the worst case (everything full on, 100% brightness), I use less than 200 watts. Plus, they won't heat up the kitchen on a hot day and I'll probably never have to get on a ladder to change a bulb.
     
  5. ToddRLockwood

    ToddRLockwood Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2012
    Messages:
    1,263
    Location:
    Burlington, Vermont
    Nice pix. Did you swap out your rear plate bulbs for LEDs? From the color temperature, it looks like you may have. There are exact LED replacements available online.
     
  6. MarkR

    MarkR Member

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2012
    Messages:
    893
    Location:
    N. Scottsdale, AZ
    Since we've replaced nearly all of the lighting for our home with LEDs, we have a lot more free energy from solar to pump into our MS - life is good!
     
  7. ToddRLockwood

    ToddRLockwood Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2012
    Messages:
    1,263
    Location:
    Burlington, Vermont
    I've put solar panels on my house, but I'm waiting on the LED bulbs to get improved color temperature. They have improved, but I'd like to see one that uses red, blue & green LEDs in combination, so the bulb will respond to dimming the same way incandescent bulbs do. I'm surprised that no one has cracked this yet.
     
  8. PhilBa

    PhilBa Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2013
    Messages:
    1,355
    Location:
    Seattle
    Not sure you will ever see that in a mass market bulb, Todd. The red shift of tungsten filaments makes for some weird effects. Many people are used to it but I've really gotten to appreciate the linearity of LED dimming. You can get programmable RGB bulbs that you can tune how ever you want though it might take some programming on your part to get just the right effect. They're somewhat pricey.

    What's really wonderful about the LEDs that are starting to ship now is the CRI is getting a lot closer to 100 (which is the holy grail for me). I just ordered 5M of strip LEDS that are 2700K with a CRI of 90+ and 325 lumens per foot. There are MR-16 LEDs that claim to have a CRI of 97.
     
  9. arg

    arg Member

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2012
    Messages:
    740
    Location:
    Cambridge, UK
    There are some cheap RGBs around - but beware, they are really nasty: the optics aren't good enough to cope with the fact that the R/G/B sources aren't in the same place, so you get light that isn't a uniform colour. Only suitable for novelty use.
     
  10. evme

    evme Member

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2013
    Messages:
    616
    Location:
    NY

    I have been replacing bulbs with LEDs all over my house and have been looking for a good LED strip, which one did you get and how is it? For MR-16, the highest CRI that I am aware of is the Soraa Vivid with 95 CRI. Which ones give 97 CRI?
     
  11. Lloyd

    Lloyd Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2011
    Messages:
    4,883
    Location:
    San Luis Obispo, CA
    Try Eco Light. I have bought a bunch from them.
     
  12. BobtheV

    BobtheV Member

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2013
    Messages:
    96
    Location:
    Salem, OR
    Sorry, but what is "CRI?"
     
  13. evme

    evme Member

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2013
    Messages:
    616
    Location:
    NY
    Color Rendering Index. To explain it simply, you see colors when light reflects off the object. The higher the CRI, the more colors you can see. A lamp with poor CRI can make some colors indistinguishable. For example, in the laundry I have a fluorescent lighting which generally has poor CRI. I put on this shirt and looked fine. I walked into sunlight and there was a HUGE stain on the shirt. The stain was a tad darker than the shirt and the poor CRI made it invisible. Generally, 80+ CRI is considered minimum of acceptable but you want 90+ CRI if you want good color representation. Nothing pisses me off like walking into a furniture/cloth store and they use poor CRI bulbs, because when you bring it home it looks completely different.

    That said it can be a bit tricky to compare CRI between two different technologies. Because CRI is not the only factor, but it is an important one. For one, I find LED bulbs much better than florescents with same or even better CRI.
     
  14. BobtheV

    BobtheV Member

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2013
    Messages:
    96
    Location:
    Salem, OR
    You mean like the poor CRI lighting used at my Tesla dealership (Washington Square, Oregon)? 8^). Thanks for your response.
     
  15. ToddRLockwood

    ToddRLockwood Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2012
    Messages:
    1,263
    Location:
    Burlington, Vermont
    Thanks for the info, Phil. I do use LED reflector floods in locations where the color and contrast of the LEDs is suitable. But I still find that the 3,200k LEDs are too strident for the kitchen and family room. Incidentally, I have about 25 recessed fixtures in my home, most of them still using 65w PAR bulbs which I operate at about 60-70% brightness. Most of those bulbs are the originals from 2001 when the house was built.

    Do you think I'm saving power by running the incandescent bulbs at this reduced level all the time? (The dimmers are solid state.)
     
  16. Cosmacelf

    Cosmacelf Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2013
    Messages:
    3,399
    Location:
    San Diego
    PhilBa, can you post a link to those 97 cri LEDs? That is what I'm waiting for, decent light! No matter how warm the color in the fluorescents or LEDs, they are still missing wavelengths...
     
  17. PhilBa

    PhilBa Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2013
    Messages:
    1,355
    Location:
    Seattle
    Cosmic, My bad, It's a cri of 95. Still pretty good. Soraa. 00135. 2700K MR-16. There are others from them with the same cri. 1000bulbs.com carries them. There is another manufacturer that has a >90 CRI line but I couldn't find them. There are tons of companies that are making incredible progress every day.

    Todd, yes you are saving power but only by the dimmer reduction. Lower efficiency per lumen though. There are tons of 2700k bulbs out there. Most have a CRI above 80. I agree that 3000k and above are terrible. Way too harsh.
     

Share This Page