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Low on power warning

Discussion in 'Model X' started by Sandiegodoug, May 20, 2017.

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  1. Sandiegodoug

    Sandiegodoug Member

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    we are receiving our x in a month and my wife paranoid about running out on juice. We upgraded to 100d, but wondered if the dash changes color or there are warnings to charge asap. Her friend has a fiat ev and dash turned red, freaked her out. Just wondering if x does something like that?
     
  2. Saghost

    Saghost Active Member

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    Lots of things. The battery icon turns yellow at 20% and red at a level below that (I think 10%, but I'm not sure off the top of my head.)

    If you're on a Navigation routing and your predicted battery level at arrival drops below 7%, it starts giving you warnings in both the center console and instrument cluster "stay below XX mph to reach destination" with XX starting at 65 and falling at least to 50 if you persist (not sure how low the lowest is.)

    I've never seen it, but apparently if you get to a low state of charge and you're leaving range of known Superchargers and Destination chargers it gives a warning about running out of range.

    Of course, at any time you can hit the lightning bolt on the Navigation display and it'll give you a list of Superchargers and then Destination chargers in range, each set sorted by distance.
     
  3. cpa

    cpa Active Member

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    The battery indicator changes from green to yellowish at 20% capacity. It then changes to red at 7%.

    If you are driving distances, the touchscreen will show a pop-up message to keep your speed below 65, 60, 55 whatever in order to reach your destination if it seems to be too far away and your speeds are high.

    In my opinion I would suggest using the energy graph and look at the 30-mile average to see how many "miles" remain. In addition, using the trip graph if your destination is dialed in will give her a real good estimate on the battery reserve upon arrival.

    When you dial into your destination, the trip graph will decline from your present state of charge to an estimated remaining state of charge. As you drive, the actual results will move the line on the graph up (you are doing better than the estimate) or down (worse.) Keep an eye on the estimated percentage reserve.

    Yes, it can be daunting at first! But a few day trips to outlying locations to charge will remove any fear or angst.

    Enjoy!
     
  4. Sandiegodoug

    Sandiegodoug Member

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    T
     
  5. Sandiegodoug

    Sandiegodoug Member

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    Thanks
    Tesla newbies
    Salesperson said we will not ever have to worry about range. Unfortunately I'm the type(when wife not in car) that stretches it to the point of running out.
     
  6. Saghost

    Saghost Active Member

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    Accidentally running out of charge is harder than running out of gas, but certainly possible if you ignore the warnings. Tesla gives you a whole lot more information to help you make a decision than anyone else has to date, and you can generally extend the range enough to make a leg work just by slowing down if you need to (and the car will let you know if you need to.)

    Unless you routinely drive from LA to Tijuana and back, running out on a daily basis really isn't a problem - range is really only a factor on road trips for any Tesla under typical usage (assuming you can charge at home/work every day, of course.)
     
  7. Sandiegodoug

    Sandiegodoug Member

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    Just another question, my brother claims that even if battery at zero there is some unpublished reserve. Is that true. I know when my tundra on empty there is at least 5
    Gallons in the tank.
     
  8. Peteybabes

    Peteybabes redneck drivin' a tesla...

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    i recently did a run to NJ and back from Ohio, (in a loaner MS75D). i decided to cut my visit a few minutes short at a supercharger and headed to the next one anyway...

    right from the get-go it said that i would have to stay below 55 mph to reach the next supercharger, but i set the cruise to 75mph and took off, 7 miles from the next supercharger my battery went to 0% and cut my power output, but did not reduce my speed. when i arrived at the supercharger i was at -1% battery, lol, who would have guessed.

    in short i think that the Tesla software is very conservative, and there's a little extra range on the battery...
     
  9. Sandiegodoug

    Sandiegodoug Member

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    Thanks
    That is very reassuring.
     
  10. Saghost

    Saghost Active Member

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    No designed reserve as such, and you should never plan on it.

    However, a number of folks have driven several miles after the car said Zero without problems.

    Others have had it shut down the second it turned to 0.

    The thing is, the car is estimating the actual capacity of the cells based on voltages and power in/out. This isn't an exact measurement. So Tesla takes a slightly conservative approach with their estimate.

    The car shuts down when one of the 96 groups of cells in series hits a critical low voltage, and how well balanced the pack is affects how close that point is to the estimate.
     
  11. cpa

    cpa Active Member

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    The sales person is in sales; need I say more?

    The thing about electric cars is that we rarely need to "fill 'er up." We charge enough at point A to reach point B comfortably. (Of course what is comfortable for you and what is comfortable for your wife are part of the fun and excitement of marriage! :eek:)

    You say that you are from San Diego. So, you do a day trip from your home to El Centro, Indio, Temecula via the Palms to Pines Highway, and home. [The following are all made-up numbers; they are just for illustration.]

    Home to El Centro Supercharger is 97 miles. You leave home with 60% state of charge, and the trip graph shows you will arrive at El Centro with 25%. Keep an eye on the graph periodically. The graph takes into account the additional energy it takes to ascend the grade as well as the energy regained upon descent to El Centro. One-third into your trip you see that the estimated reserve has dropped to 22%. Not to worry. If it dropped to 10%, yeah, cut your speed by 5-10 MPH and see if it stabilizes or increases.

    You arrive at El Centro with 20% battery reserve. You dial into the Indio Supercharger and see that you do not have enough range. Fifteen minutes into the charge, your battery is at 55%, and the estimated reserve for Indio is at 15%. You think that is plenty and head out.

    You arrive at Indio with 16% reserve, and dial in the Temecula Supercharger. The nav system will likely take you west on Interstate 10 to highway 79, but let's say you want to go off the main road and experience mountain driving. The nav system is not set up for this yet, but you estimate that it will take about 60% to reach Temecula comfortably because you used "EVTripplanner. com" to calculate the needed charge. (I highly recommend checking this site out.)

    The navigation system does recalculate once it figures out that you know the road better than it does.

    Just a couple of things to keep in mind: Speed really eats into range. You can go much farther at 65MPH than at 80. Elevation gains eat into range too. Conversely, elevation losses add a bunch of range due to regnerative braking and gravity. Wind and extreme weather is the worst offender of all. A 25MPH headwind or crosswind can reduce range by a significant amount. The trip planning tools do not consider wind, rain, snow, etc. but they do consider "average speed" for the road and elevation gains and losses.
     
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  12. Sandiegodoug

    Sandiegodoug Member

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    So we like camping up at idylwild, at almost 7000 feet. Car will take into account climb
    Does it work better at altitude (less air)
    Finally, there is a non tesla charger in anza
    Does it see non tesla chargers too?
     
  13. Saghost

    Saghost Active Member

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    I doubt you'll notice the difference, but technically it will be a little faster/more efficient at altitude, due to reduced air resistance. Certainly you won't experience the power fade that ICEs get.

    The current iteration of the route energy planner doesn't do a great job with elevation in my experience. At least with my X, it underpredicts both the amount of energy needed to climb and the amount of regen it'll get back by a significant margin - with the result that the trip planner gets excessively worried when you're at higher elevations during the route but the initial estimate is reasonably close if your start and end are at similar elevations.

    The built in navigation and "lightning bolt" on the center screen do not include non-tesla chargers, but POI search is by google maps and I think can find them if you look for them specifically. Most of us use Plugshare to locate them, either on a phone or on the center screen web browser.

    The car comes with a J1772 adapter for all the non-Tesla AC chargers, and a CHAdeMO adapter is available for DC. There's a lot of speculation about a CCS adapter, but none has been released so far.
     
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  14. Sandiegodoug

    Sandiegodoug Member

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    Thanks for your info. I think for the most part will use at home and range no issue but when we get car wife wants to go on a tesla vacation. Guess it will be trial by fire first trip
    But sounds like it will be ok
     
  15. WARP 10

    WARP 10 Member

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    Not a problem. We went from San Diego to Atlanta and back in our S60 in November and no worries. The only seriously uncovered route is I10/20 from Casa Grande to Dallas or Austin, although Tesla's opened a couple of more SCs in El Paso and a couple of other places along that route so that it's now almost completely covered. Just about any other direction is no problem at all, especially for a 100.
     

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