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Lowering Links

Discussion in 'Model S: Driving Dynamics' started by PlugNPlay85, Nov 13, 2016.

  1. PlugNPlay85

    PlugNPlay85 Member

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    Lately I have been looking into lowering links for my MS

    I have a couple of questions for those out there that have used them....

    1. What lowering links are recommended?

    2. Does anyone know if the links currently available work on a 2016?
     
  2. artsci

    artsci Sponsor

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    You want the adjustable type -- many offerings to chose. I can't think of any reason they won't work on a 2016. You might want to to check
    this thread for more info.
     
  3. ChameleonP85

    ChameleonP85 Member

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    @PlugNPlay85 ...not sure if this is still a valid point to you, but I have the UP Sport Brackets for lowering on my S P85. It applies to any Model S with Air Suspension.

    1. I have used lowering links, and i highly DO NOT RECOMMEND them. Let me explain, a lowering link is a link much like stock, but it is threaded. There are no visible markings or locks to keep it at the defined location. So each wheel then becomes completely independent. When you change the lowering link on a Tesla, you run the risk of the air suspension "resetting itself" into a position whereby you have to get the vehicle towed to Tesla to reset the calibration. Every time I had a professional shop install these things, the vehicle was always riding with some vibration or looseness. Most links are made from generic suppliers....

    2. I switched to UP Brackets. they have two precisely engineered and cut holes, one for sport (approximate 1.3" drop), and one for OEM (Standard) as close to OEM as you can get. A lot of people will say oh you want the adjustability, but its like a sleep number bed, there's a setting that you like, no one adjusts their sleep number bed...once you find that setting you're going to stick with it. UP Brackets have been ENGINEERED for the model s, for best performance and looks...sure some might say its extreme, but i think it looks amazing. It is completely warrantied by the company, and you don't have to mess with the suspension. Plus when Tesla calibrates your suspension, they'll never mess it up. Their customer service is impeccable, the owner will even answer calls!

    Yes the links will work on your 2016...

    The Tesla is an expensive vehicle, get the Brackets, you won't regret it. I have pictures available if you want to see the difference of stock vs. lowered.
     
  4. scottm

    scottm Active Member

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    #4 scottm, Sep 6, 2017
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2017
    Or if you just want to play, 3D print some of your own in plastic... search over on thingiverse.com for "tesla lowering link"

    Different lengths result in different amount of drop. Choosing the +4mm set results in dropping the car very close to how the car was originally designed to ride. This happens to be visually very close to what you see on the center console suspension page, which is showing "optimistically lower" than what stock links really do. If you get out and take a picture of the side of the car on "standard" setting and compare to what you see on console, you'll know what I mean, the car is actually riding higher than what is showing on the screen.

    Put the +4's on all the way around, and voila! Your car will actually look like what you see on screen when you adjust to that ride height.

    Put on +6 or +8 and your car is slammed. Change as often as you like. Break one? Print another.
     
  5. PlugNPlay85

    PlugNPlay85 Member

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    I think I am leaning more toward the UP brackets, How was the install?

    Did you need to redo your alignment?

    How is your tire wear?

    Could you please post some pictures?

    I appreciate the info!
     
  6. ChameleonP85

    ChameleonP85 Member

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    Install was Simple...(Not that I did it myself)...but a good auto shop did. Total install time is roughly 1 - 1.5 hr?

    All they have to do is remove the OLD bracket, and put the new one its place. There are precut holes (Sport - lowered, and Standard - OEM-Like). They come in a really nice anodized Blue and when you see the difference in the quality of the brackets you're replacing you'll be astounded!

    No need to do alignment, however you need to make sure the vehicle is in JACK MODE.

    Tire wear - so here's what I do...my standard mode is a about 1/2" lower than the low mode used to be....so i keep it in standard, then at 75+ (extremely spirited driving) i go into low mode...obviously tire wear will wear more to the inside of the tire, but if you rotate your back tires you get considerable more time from them.

    I will post pics of the brackets and vehicle soon, my car is sooo dirty, I feel embarrassed to even try right now lol...
     
    • Like x 1
  7. ChameleonP85

    ChameleonP85 Member

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    upload_2017-9-11_10-11-41.png
    upload_2017-9-11_10-11-58.png
     
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  8. artsci

    artsci Sponsor

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    I would suggest the the professional shop was at fault. Lowering links are a very simple device that work very well -- after all the Telsa lowering links are pretty much the same as the generic products, only the latter are adjustable. The UP sport brackets IMHO are an unnecessary expense

    "Generic" works just fine and I HIGHLY RECOMMEND THEM. I've had them on my car for two years plus -- they have locking nuts so the settings can't change and they've held steady with non of the "vibration or looseness" you cited.

    I posted this thread over two years ago about installation and settings. It might be helpful for for those of you who are thinking about lowering links. I studied all of the options for about a month before doing having the links installed at a local shop.
     
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  9. ChameleonP85

    ChameleonP85 Member

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    @artsci...

    Glad they worked for you... Didnt work for me.

    I like the up brackets... A solid look and ride.

    To each their own.

    There isnt a right or wrong here.
     
    • Like x 1
  10. Russell

    Russell Member

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  11. artsci

    artsci Sponsor

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  12. The Duke

    The Duke Member

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    Anyone have an alignment shop willing to spend the time documenting suspension alignment changes with the lowering links?
    My friend declined. I was going to go on the alignment rack at normal height, raise for upper readings and lower for final set.

    On my Pantera raise and lower did little to toe in front or rear, but on son's Fiero lowering gave a ton of toe in. Both had camber changes. Neither had air suspension so we had to remove springs and jack the car up and down. VERY time consuming, but we had to know. Eventually we fixed the Fiero.
     

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