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Lowering the Model 3

mact3333

Member
May 24, 2013
236
576
near Portland OR
I only plan on keeping M3 long rage dual motor that I bought this past weekend for only 2 years, otherwise I'd be all over lowering this car...might do it anyway...tempted.
 

PIEric

Member
Feb 23, 2018
46
36
California
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mal_tsla

Member
Sep 29, 2016
698
942
Austin, TX
Most cars (including the Model 3) have the appearance of "reverse rake" stock because the fender opening is taller in the front than the rear.

Lowering the car makes this more noticable.

The best way to measure ride height before/after is from a fixed point on the chassis. Failing that, measuring from the top of the fender opening to the center of the hub or the floor are acceptable ways of measuring ride height.

The stock gap is certainly larger in the rear than in front.... At least on my specimen.
 

hydro 481

Active Member
Sep 4, 2017
1,201
855
USA
Looks good, yeah the Performance AWD is 1.0" front and 1.4" rear. TSportline and UP offer the same drop front and back on AWD Performance, so I'm really curious why Eibach made such a difference, and I'd love to see pics.

While not on their configuration wizard, they do exist:
PRO-KIT Performance Springs (Set of 4 Springs)
The Tsportline AWD Performance springs is 1” front and 1.2” rear
 

DB-Cooper

Member
Oct 29, 2018
381
320
Austin, TX
The Tsportline AWD Performance springs is 1” front and 1.2” rear

Oh I guess I missed that. They've got a good pic on their web site, definitely doesn't look like it's sagging.
 

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BAven8068

Member
Nov 5, 2016
208
193
Chicago
What's the biggest disadvantage to lowering the car?

I have yet to discover any disadvantages, only positives, but again that’s just me.

People are gonna stop you and ask what’s different about your car... because it looks so good and sporty. Is it one of those performance models? So if you’re in a hurry that is gonna slow you down.

It is shocking how much just an inch or so of lowering changes the overall appearance of the car drastically.
 
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Lunares

Member
Jul 9, 2018
752
572
San Diego
I have yet to discover any disadvantages, only positives, but again that’s just me.



It is shocking how much just an inch or so of lowering changes the overall appearance of the car drastically.

My Model3 with race wheels ready to go!

I purposefully have my track wheels smaller than stock, so definitely looking to lower! problem is I want to be able to also fit my 20" wheels. and be able to actually get a jack under the car....
 

Lunares

Member
Jul 9, 2018
752
572
San Diego
What has been seen, can never be unseen.

Those red wheels

They actually look super awesome in person. Tried to take the pictures in better light.

Definitely not something I will daily drive but fun to show off at the track! Was better than same black like all the others.
 

DeHakkelaar

Active Member
Dec 18, 2018
1,631
799
Netherlands
A lot of these photos look like the car has reverse rake after lowering. Is it just the camera, or does the car look like that in person? It's my #1 reservation...

I have a non lowered (yet) M3 LR AWD with the 18" stock wheels and yesterday I accurately measured the wheel gap at the front and the back.
Front: 5,9mm (2,32 inch)
Back: 6,6mm (2,60 inch)

So stock, the front is lower than the back. Like it should be. At least, on an AWD!

The car of @BAven8068 certainly looks a little lower at the back. I dont know if that already was the case when you got it...
Maybe Tesla uses the same springs on a RWD and AWD and since the AWD is heavier in the front it is a little lower there.
just my 2 cents of thought...
 

BAven8068

Member
Nov 5, 2016
208
193
Chicago
I have a non lowered (yet) M3 LR AWD with the 18" stock wheels and yesterday I accurately measured the wheel gap at the front and the back.
Front: 5,9mm (2,32 inch)
Back: 6,6mm (2,60 inch)

So stock, the front is lower than the back. Like it should be. At least, on an AWD!

The car of @BAven8068 certainly looks a little lower at the back. I dont know if that already was the case when you got it...
Maybe Tesla uses the same springs on a RWD and AWD and since the AWD is heavier in the front it is a little lower there.
just my 2 cents of thought...

I never measured the car when it was on stock springs, but I do know that both gaps were awkwardly large.

I think the appearance of the rear being lower on the aftermarket springs isn’t really the case. The car overall seems level but to me the front fender opening is just larger therefore giving it the look of being higher.

In order to get the same gap size in the front and the rear you would have to have the front sit lower.
 

T34ME

Active Member
Mar 31, 2016
2,262
3,872
Inland Empire
What's the biggest disadvantage to lowering the car?
Potential scraping on driveways, speed bumps, dips at intersections, and bumper stops. I have to take my driveway approach at an angle or else my stock height 3 will scrape. City will not let me modify my driveway approach because it is city ordinance to facilitate drainage. YMMV
 
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DeHakkelaar

Active Member
Dec 18, 2018
1,631
799
Netherlands
I never measured the car when it was on stock springs, but I do know that both gaps were awkwardly large.

I think the appearance of the rear being lower on the aftermarket springs isn’t really the case. The car overall seems level but to me the front fender opening is just larger therefore giving it the look of being higher.

What about just measure it like I did? :)

Just put/slide a strip of straight metal flat on top of the tire and make it stick out enough. Then use for example a caliper to measure the distance to the car.
 

BAven8068

Member
Nov 5, 2016
208
193
Chicago
What about just measure it like I did? :)

Just put/slide a strip of straight metal flat on top of the tire and make it stick out enough. Then use for example a caliper to measure the distance to the car.

I don't need to measure it to know that the gap between tire and fender is larger in the front than the same gap in the back, but this has nothing to do with determining if the car is level from to back to front. Again you can have the fender wells cut differently and that throws your measure measurement off with your method. The front fender well is not an identical shape and size to the rear fender.
 

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