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Lowest option inventory cars?

Discussion in 'Model S: Ordering, Production, Delivery' started by No2DinosaurFuel, Apr 23, 2015.

  1. No2DinosaurFuel

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    I am interested in getting the lowest option equipped Model S 85. I was wondering if they even exist as inventory cars? I called around and tesla stores typically stock versions with more options like air, tech, etc and thus they would take the price on to the car and then deduct the miles for the discount. I was hoping they would have base base model without any of the bells and whistles.

    Do these inventory cars even exist?
     
  2. brianman

    brianman Burrito Founder

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    When the loaner program was announced, Elon said something to the effect of "these will be nearly fully optioned vehicles" with the idea being that they act as a general marketing mechanism and as a temptation for owners of existing vehicles to trade up. As such, when building cars for the loaner program they tend to be "well equipped". There are some inventory cars that are configurations that were reserved, configured, and then later cancelled -- but I don't know how often those come up, and it's likely all over the map what kind of configuration was chosen for them.

    There's also "CPO" cars ("used") that are also likely a variety of configurations.

    Good luck in the hunt!
     
  3. MsElectric

    MsElectric Active Member

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    If you are looking for a car with few options inventory cars are likely the wrong place and I agree with Brianman. Look at this way, it costs Tesla pennies on the dollar to add options to cars. That $3,000 Premium Package probably costs them $600. So it makes all the sense in the world for them to configure inventory cars well equipped so they can serve as marketing/product demonstration vehicles and then sell them at a higher profit margin.

    If you want a vehicle with less options why not buy one of the used S85s? I bet you can buy one for just around $60K. You can always add the 4 year extended warranty to the car you buy and it will be pretty much CPO.
     
  4. No2DinosaurFuel

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    I also hear people of getting inventory cars and "removing" things like 21 inch wheel and such to further reduce the cost of the car. But thanks for the recommendation. The reason I am looking for a inventory cars as oppose to CPO cars is so I can take advantage of the tax credit on un-registered cars.
     
  5. HankLloydRight

    HankLloydRight Fluxing

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    They did that a while back, but stopped the practice just before I bought my inventory car early last year. Once they changed the policy, it was inventory cars are delivered "as-is" and they won't make any option changes. I wanted them to remove the rear jump seats for credit, and at first they said yes, but then the policy changed and they said "sorry, charlie". And along the same lines, they stopped swapping out wheel packages also. Besides seats and wheels, I'm not sure there's much else you can "remove" from a model s.
     
  6. brianman

    brianman Burrito Founder

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    How rude. They don't even call you by your name correctly anymore.
     
  7. MsElectric

    MsElectric Active Member

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    Personally I would never accept the delivery of car with 21" wheels even if they gave me extra money for that. If your roads are bad, like ours are on the East Coast, those 21" wheels are worthless with all the hassle they are going to cause when they bend and break. It's too bad they stopped swapping those 21" wheels for the 19" wheels.

    When I looked at a few inventory P85Ds the 21" wheels were a deal breaker for several cars . I was like "You want me to consider a car with wheels that can't handle a moderate pothole and I need to pay $4,500 for the privilege of driving around in wheels that can't handle the streets of NY? No Thanks."
     
  8. Tampaukfan

    Tampaukfan Member

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    Cant remove the 21's or upgrade either.. They will remove 21" snow tires or 19" snow tires options but thats it.
    They may have permitted removing in the past but as of 3 weeks ago they did not.

     
  9. arijaycomet

    arijaycomet Member

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    Some great replies above, for sure. Having purchased 3 Inventory cars in the last 4-months from Tesla, I'm a bit of an expert on this matter. My first car was an 85 classic, out of Chicago, with ~1,500 miles on the odometer and a $7k discount. The second was my 85D also out of Chicago (note that I'm in Cleveland, Ohio)-- that car had ~1,200 miles, and a $6,500 discount. The latter car added AWD and Autopilot, which were the two features that I most wanted. (also added air suspension etc).

    But the car that relates most to this topic here is my wife's inventory car, which came out of Florida. It required the "approval" of both the Midwest and South-East regional sales managers to approve the out-of-region transfer of a vehicle (so yes, for those wondering, it CAN be done-- but its not standard practice). But before I tell you about the car she got, let me tell you about the one that got away. There was another out-of-region car that was exactly what you're talking about-- ZERO OPTIONS. We had been looking to lease, and that car was basic black, textile interior, NO features/options. It was $71k -- but then discounted another $10k as I recall. I don't remember the final MSRP, but I can tell you that the lease rate was under $600 per month!

    If you find an inventory car with a deep discount, leasing tends to actually prove to be the better option. Financing is nice (for the $7500 credit) -- but then you're forced into purchasing the car. Obviously there are benefits there (interest rates are low on new cars, or perhaps you have cash). But the benefit of leasing inventory cars is huge-- for every $3,600 off MSPR (Discount) that directly relates to another $100/month off the price of the car (and you pay less tax on that too). We lost out on the zero-option car because a local buyer had first dibs, it was out of region, and that buyer decided to purchase.

    However, the second car we found worked out equally as nice. It has options (pearl white paint upgrade, performance leather seating with suede accents and suede head liner, 21" silver wheels, and supercharging enabled). I should point out both cars were/are 60 kWh units. However, the wife's car had a $13,600+ discount -- and hence we managed to put down the standard $5k deposit, plus acquisition fees and other fees-- and then paid our sales tax up front-- allowing for a net $600/month payment. The car had just over 5,000 miles when we acquired it -- but again, sold as new, full warranty, etc.

    TL;DR
    To answer your questions more succinctly ---
    1- there are cars out there w/o options but they are VERY rear and hard to find
    2- instead, finding cars with deep inventory discounts may be easier, to offset what options the cars do have
    3- when finding inventory cars, the lowest monthly payment comes from the deepest "showroom discount" you can find
    4- out of region cars might be required, to get the best deal, so don't be afraid to ask for that and see what happens

    Good luck!
     
  10. HankLloydRight

    HankLloydRight Fluxing

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    I just want to chime in here -- the 21" wheels are not as bad as you make them sound. I live in the greater NYC area, and while I do put on 19" all-seasons for the winter, I'm running the 21" Turbines the rest of the year (3 seasons out of 4)... and really haven't had any problems. I do watch for and avoid big potholes as much as I can (which I do in any car I drive, so it's nothing new)..and I've even hit a few really big potholes with the 21" wheels and nothing at all happened. Also, maybe I haven't read every thread and post, but I've never heard of the 21" wheels "breaking." I do really like the look, handling, and performance of the 21" wheels and summer tires (Hankook Ventus V12s evos), and I'm not going to give that up just because there's a chance (if I'm inattentive) that I might run into a pothole that might bend a wheel. And even if that did happen, it's about $100 to get a bent rim straightened out.

    And if by chance someone ends up with the perfect inventory car, but it has 21" Turbines on them, you can easily sell them to other owners and the put on your choice of 19" rims and have some cash left over. I would not consider a good deal on an inventory car a "dealbreaker" just because it had the 21" rims.
     
  11. MsElectric

    MsElectric Active Member

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    I think you have been exceptionally lucky. The experience I have had with low profile tires are terrible. I will never get them in a car I buy even if they paid me $5,000 to have them in my car let alone pay them $4,500 to get them. The fact that the car does not have a spare tire makes it all the more important to have durable tires.

    It is a matter if fact and physics that the 21" wheels are more prone to damage and failure and I completely understand people like you getting them knowing the drawbacks but when I got low profile tires I had no idea how fragile they were and I'm just sharing what i learned the hard way.

    If you live in an area with impeccably maintained roads the 21" wheels will likely be fine but if you drive the roads i drive, it is only a matter of time before the low profile wheels will bend or fail.

    And having a low profile wheel be damaged by a moderate pothole has nothing to do with being inattentive. When you drive your focus is on safety, especially in heavy traffic. By the time you see a pothole you may have just a second or two to react if it cleared the car in front of you and you may have nowhere to go.

    After my last horrible low profile tire experience I'd now pay extra for extra tough tires :) While I like to accelerate I do not track race so my number one priority with my tires is to deliver reasonable grip for my driving and not fail.
     
  12. HankLloydRight

    HankLloydRight Fluxing

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    I agree with most of what you said... my point was just for people buying Model S inventory cars with 21" wheels, (a) they should be aware of the pros and cons, and (b) it shouldn't be a deal-breaker if the rest of the car has all the options and price they are looking for because (1) their roads might be different and not prone to potholes and hazards, otherwise the 21" wheels are great to have, and (2) even if you do have bad roads, there's a good market to quickly sell them and buy 19" rims.
     
  13. No2DinosaurFuel

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    Thanks for the reply. Glad to know they exist. Yeah i guess i will have to do some searching. Though i would prefer the 85D instead of the S60. I am only interested in the long range car.
     

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