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M3LR or MYP for road trips?

ILMMYP

Member
Apr 13, 2022
33
44
TX
Our household has a M3LR and MYP coming soon. We also have two 1600+ mi road trips scheduled this year (typical for us).
2 adults, 3 kids, and no bulky items like sports/baby gear.

Would you prioritize the range of the M3 or the extra room of the MY?

Any surprises from your road trips that were unexpected compared to road trips in an ICE car?
 
I agree with everything @Jeepxj said, especially about the state-of-charge range you want to be in between charges. I rode-tripped my 2021 MY LR from Charlotte to Chicago and back in December, and then from Charlotte to Los Angeles and back in Feb/Mar of this year, and had no problems. I know the Performance has slightly less range, but not enough to worry about.

One more thing, try to stay in places, either hotels or RV parks, where you can charge overnight. This will save you the time and cost of one charge per travel day. Plan for a last supercharger stop nearby, just in case you find out you won't be able to charge that night, and if you need to use a supercharger, go ahead and make that stop at night while the battery is warm. (On my LA trip, I was able to charge at hotels 7 out of 13 nights.)
 
my road trip basics:

1: arrival goal is 7%. burn energy by going faster. go slower if it dips under 7%. Ride the curve basically. consider how much distance between chargers as well. dont risk it if you're trying to make the only charger in 40 miles with a headwind.

2: prioritize 250kw superchargers where possible. esp when you're charger hopping without sit down eating.

3: leave when your charge rate dips below 90-100kw. quicker to do miles by just stopping more. roughly 50-60% state of charge.

4: plugshare the *sugar* outta your stops. find ones close to the highway. if you're hungry find the right food options. I pre-plan in plugshare for hotels in general areas for where i think i'll sleep. I do plus/minus 2 hours from the "ideal" sleep spot. Generally i'll have 2-3 hotels that I call to see if they will check for a charger being open. Most will gladly toss a cone in the spot for you to reserve it.

5: Be willing to move stalls if you're not getting a good charge speed. again; check plugshare for recent known bad plugs and avoid them. I will move once. if it doesnt pick up then i charge just enough to get to the next SC down the road.

i'm generally able to do roughly 1000 miles a day this way. Check the wind. that will impact you the most in the midwest. adjust charging extra accordingly.
 

Earl

Member
Jan 22, 2014
749
1,080
USA
In the summer, take either - the added range of the 3 will get there faster but the Y has more space for luggage either will be great. In winter, you should probably either put snow tires on the Y (those performance tires are not good cold or in snow/ice) or take the 3.
Otherwise, either follow the advice previously given to optimize your travel speed or don't worry about it and just do what the onboard Navigator tells you, possibly charging about 20 or 30 more miles after it says your good to go if you want more peace of mind.
The affect on range of a headwind and cold weather are the main things that surprises most experienced ICE drivers.
 
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Jeepxj

Member
Jan 18, 2020
152
140
NYC
Ahh speaking of headwinds: the app "windy" is really helpful in figuring out what its looking like. On long highway stretches I look at the trees/fields for how the wind is doing as well. When you're on autopilot most of the time its easy to not feel what the car is doing. you really do end up becoming a pilot who is more monitoring the systems. dont forget to check your "fuel burn" as part of your check.
 
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