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M3P - first long drive.

SergeyP

Member
Sep 10, 2020
64
51
London
I had my car from September last year but only used it for short daily trips. Last Sunday I did my first 340 miles round trip from London to Sheffield and back. Here are my experiences.

Motorway driving - smooth and comfortable, cruise control – fine, wipers - fine, Spotify – fine, maps - excellent, even the wife was satisfied(!). Overall, all was very fine and enjoyable, except for the battery. After night home charging I started with 99% showing 306 battery miles (not 329 as specs say and not 313 as Zap App suggested but ok anyway). To point out – the car was already at 80% and I charged it up overnight to the max using 10A plug-in charger supplied with Tesla. Return trip from London to Sheffield is 170 real miles each way. The Zap App calculated a single stop in Leicester on a way back – looked good to me. Started my journey: early morning, motorways empty so driving at normal legal limits (no racing or hard acceleration), weather 15C, one light passenger, no luggage, normal aircon, no heated seats, nothing else, just Spotify.

After 10-20 minutes on the motorway I could see the battery life was disappearing fast. After 140 real miles from home I got close to Mansfield at 24% showing remaining 73 battery miles (i.e. as if I used up 231 battery miles). Since I had another 30 miles to go and Mansfield was the last supercharger on my way, so I decided not to risk and pulled to a charger at the Outlet. When arrived 4 bays occupied and 4 empty. Price 0.29/kw not 0.26 as advertised on Zap. Forgot to take a note of my trip stats. Topped up 9% (8kW) increasing battery mileage to 103, which I thought should be plenty enough to my destination and then back to the same Outlet. When leaving charging station only 1 empty bay remaining (half hour before Outlet opens on Sunday!).

Got to Sheffield, short stop for an hour, battery lost 3% while idle with no sentry and started driving back to Mansfield with 50 battery miles remaining. When setting home destination Tesla calculated charging stop at the nearest supercharge at Mansfield (as was my plan). On the motorway I got really nervous arriving to Mansfield with just 4% and 15 battery miles. So the short round trip of 60 real miles happened to be 90 battery miles (I took the reading: 58.6 mi; 18 kWh; 308 Wh/mi). Charged 25 minutes to 80% (251 battery miles) and headed back to London. Arrived home at exactly 20% (61 battery miles). The reading: 142.4 mi; 44 kWh; 306Wh/mi. In summary, my day return journey was 340 real miles, started with 99%, topped up 69kW (8 + 61), finished with 20%. Total damage £20.01 (supercharger).

I was surprised with the overall consumption, and consequently the cost. In my last petrol Merc I would probably spend under £19 for the same journey (at the old petrol prices). Obviously supercharger rates are much more expensive than charging at home but what other options did I have? Waiting in Tesco for 10 hours at the POD charger? Also, the £20 I spent does not include that I started at 99% and finished at 20%. Overall, I am concerned abt the difference between the projected battery miles and actual miles.

Questions:

How can I calculate the total kW consumption for the whole trip? Is it possible to find this stats somewhere (I can only see data from the last charge and I did not note the data from my first part of the trip)? Is it stored somewhere that I can access (for free)? Or can I calculate this manually using the data above?

Was my first long drive battery experience normal or should I start worrying (I am already!)

I heard that I can check the battery health (depletion?) somehow somewhere. Where can I check it?

Efficiency on my return journey was better than on outward journey. I do not recall any significant changes on both trips (apart from the car was an extra passenger heavier on a way back). Could charging at slow speed at home result in a low battery trip life compared to charging at Supercharger? If relevant, my lifetime data: 3,888 miles; 1,542 kWh; 397 Wh/mi
 

NorfolkMustard

Active Member
Apr 18, 2019
2,214
2,186
M3P w/FSD
Just a few mph makes all the difference, wind resistance etc. Use the energy graph to see the impact.

keep the energy graph on 255wh/mile and you’ll get the advertised rage near enough
 

Black306

Member
Oct 14, 2019
591
853
Sacramento
I had my car from September last year but only used it for short daily trips. Last Sunday I did my first 340 miles round trip from London to Sheffield and back. Here are my experiences.

Motorway driving - smooth and comfortable, cruise control – fine, wipers - fine, Spotify – fine, maps - excellent, even the wife was satisfied(!). Overall, all was very fine and enjoyable, except for the battery. After night home charging I started with 99% showing 306 battery miles (not 329 as specs say and not 313 as Zap App suggested but ok anyway). To point out – the car was already at 80% and I charged it up overnight to the max using 10A plug-in charger supplied with Tesla. Return trip from London to Sheffield is 170 real miles each way. The Zap App calculated a single stop in Leicester on a way back – looked good to me. Started my journey: early morning, motorways empty so driving at normal legal limits (no racing or hard acceleration), weather 15C, one light passenger, no luggage, normal aircon, no heated seats, nothing else, just Spotify.

After 10-20 minutes on the motorway I could see the battery life was disappearing fast. After 140 real miles from home I got close to Mansfield at 24% showing remaining 73 battery miles (i.e. as if I used up 231 battery miles). Since I had another 30 miles to go and Mansfield was the last supercharger on my way, so I decided not to risk and pulled to a charger at the Outlet. When arrived 4 bays occupied and 4 empty. Price 0.29/kw not 0.26 as advertised on Zap. Forgot to take a note of my trip stats. Topped up 9% (8kW) increasing battery mileage to 103, which I thought should be plenty enough to my destination and then back to the same Outlet. When leaving charging station only 1 empty bay remaining (half hour before Outlet opens on Sunday!).

Got to Sheffield, short stop for an hour, battery lost 3% while idle with no sentry and started driving back to Mansfield with 50 battery miles remaining. When setting home destination Tesla calculated charging stop at the nearest supercharge at Mansfield (as was my plan). On the motorway I got really nervous arriving to Mansfield with just 4% and 15 battery miles. So the short round trip of 60 real miles happened to be 90 battery miles (I took the reading: 58.6 mi; 18 kWh; 308 Wh/mi). Charged 25 minutes to 80% (251 battery miles) and headed back to London. Arrived home at exactly 20% (61 battery miles). The reading: 142.4 mi; 44 kWh; 306Wh/mi. In summary, my day return journey was 340 real miles, started with 99%, topped up 69kW (8 + 61), finished with 20%. Total damage £20.01 (supercharger).

I was surprised with the overall consumption, and consequently the cost. In my last petrol Merc I would probably spend under £19 for the same journey (at the old petrol prices). Obviously supercharger rates are much more expensive than charging at home but what other options did I have? Waiting in Tesco for 10 hours at the POD charger? Also, the £20 I spent does not include that I started at 99% and finished at 20%. Overall, I am concerned abt the difference between the projected battery miles and actual miles.

Questions:

How can I calculate the total kW consumption for the whole trip? Is it possible to find this stats somewhere (I can only see data from the last charge and I did not note the data from my first part of the trip)? Is it stored somewhere that I can access (for free)? Or can I calculate this manually using the data above?

Was my first long drive battery experience normal or should I start worrying (I am already!)

I heard that I can check the battery health (depletion?) somehow somewhere. Where can I check it?

Efficiency on my return journey was better than on outward journey. I do not recall any significant changes on both trips (apart from the car was an extra passenger heavier on a way back). Could charging at slow speed at home result in a low battery trip life compared to charging at Supercharger? If relevant, my lifetime data: 3,888 miles; 1,542 kWh; 397 Wh/mi

397Wh/mi lifetime average is really high. I'm curious what was your trip consumption average. Did you happen to reset a trip meter prior to the drive? IIRC, my Wh/mi consumption was "only" ~320 with 4 people, full trunk, HVAC on, and cruising at ~75MPH on a long distance trip.
 

Alic01

Member
Apr 22, 2021
203
212
Aberdeenshire
70 +/-10% (but mostly +), except for some part on M1 with temporary 60mph (there no +/- !).
So 77 then 😜

I averaged 305 wh/m on a trip this weekend, four in the car, trunk and frunk full.

That was driving Aberdeen to St Andrews so 70mph average speed for 80% of the journey and national speed limit a road for the rest.

Was a great introduction to the car having taken delivery on Friday afternoon. Was amazed how much more economical it was around town when we got there averaging 220wh/m.

Free destination charging at the hotel made for a very enjoyable trip and weekend away.

Three phantom breaking events on the way home, one of them for very good reason but the others totally out of the blue, wipers faultless, will take some getting used to but it’s a lovely car to go on a journey in.
 

s4nup

Member
Jun 17, 2021
9
1
Harrow
£19 in petrol in your Petrol Merc for 340 mile round trip?? What Merc was it? I had a C200 up until last week and that had 420 mile range. maybe I have a heavy right foot 😂
 

SergeyP

Member
Sep 10, 2020
64
51
London
397Wh/mi lifetime average is really high. I'm curious what was your trip consumption average. Did you happen to reset a trip meter prior to the drive? IIRC, my Wh/mi consumption was "only" ~320 with 4 people, full trunk, HVAC on, and cruising at ~75MPH on a long distance trip.
unfortunately not, I should have reset the trip meter but forgot and also did not check the data from last charge when arrived to Mansfield from home.
Lifetime - I blamed on my driving during short daily trips, but that was certainly not the case on the motorway. Thus I was surprised with the high consumption.
 

SergeyP

Member
Sep 10, 2020
64
51
London
£19 in petrol in your Petrol Merc for 340 mile round trip?? What Merc was it? I had a C200 up until last week and that had 420 mile range. maybe I have a heavy right foot 😂
E350 (ok, not fully petrol). I was able to get close to 700 w/o charge (but the charge was actually only giving me 10 miles).
 

HenryT

Member
Jan 29, 2020
686
563
Manchester
E350 (ok, not fully petrol). I was able to get close to 700 w/o charge (but the charge was actually only giving me 10 miles).
I had a 350e and found that although the battery could only deliver 12 miles at best from 100% charge, the car's ability to add regenerated power while you were driving was really good. I would often see that 1/3 of any journey would be on electricity, even on a 300 mile trip.
 
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Drew57

Active ember
Apr 4, 2020
1,115
1,351
Chester UK
In my experience it's the 70mph +10% that would make the biggest difference. I generally drive on motorways at just below 70mph and that gives very close to the 310m EPA rating for my car.

It's also strange that the OP mentions 3% battery loss for an hour long stop without Sentry - even if I leave it on for a couple of hours my car doesn't show any reduction.
 
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Mrklaw

Member
Mar 5, 2020
430
226
Berkshire
yeah that usage is v.high. If it was windy/rainy that can contribute but mainly speed - energy use ramps up pretty quick above 70. If you put it on cruise at 70-72 you should see more like 250-270wh/m
 

pgkevet

Active Member
Jul 1, 2019
1,426
1,216
mid wales
Oh, so many factors involved...
You have admitted to 77mph and (if I looked back correctly) you were driving into a 3-4mph effective headwind (with some gusts) so really burning fuel at 80+mph. If totally on some form of cruise control it may have been steady but reality is folk will add bursts of speed for overtakes and while regen braking gives power back it's always a net loss. I’m sure your car had to slow down and speed up during that trip which would equate to something around the power required to drive at 82-83mph steady. Add in geographical height changes, map distance versus track distance (lane changes) and you can see where i'm going with this..
On a 'nice day' with low traffic on the motorway in my S I'll cruise at 75mph and actually match/beat it's theoretical range 300 mile range. In adverse conditions, traffic, cold etc I'll lose 30-40%.
Then there are folk who happily push limits and drive down to single digit battery % and folk like me who would rather always keep 20+% reserve even if it means extra stops.
 

tomorrowman

Member
Mar 10, 2020
296
273
Hampshire
For reference my recent 220 mile journey, mainly on motorways, in a M3LR consumed 240ish KW/mile.
That was with AP on and set to 70, with the odd manual control overtake (large sections of M6 being limited to 60mph no doubt helped).
 

pgkevet

Active Member
Jul 1, 2019
1,426
1,216
mid wales
For reference my recent 220 mile journey, mainly on motorways, in a M3LR consumed 240ish KW/mile.
That was with AP on and set to 70, with the odd manual control overtake (large sections of M6 being limited to 60mph no doubt helped).
Hmmm...not good : less than 1/3rd mile on a full charge:rolleyes::D
 

Gatsojon

Member
Aug 4, 2019
641
624
Manchester UK
Firstly switch from miles range to percent. The miles mean nothing. If you want to know your range then look at the energy graph as this factors in your actual energy use.
My average consumption for my 15 months and 6600 miles is now 315 W/mile. It was just below 300 over the first 6 months as they were the warm ones. On a longer motorway journey it will drop to 250 or so but as others have said, a few mph difference on cruising speed makes quite a difference to consumption.

The supercharger network is great for road trips but never intended as only charging method. Mixed with mostly home charging, the cost is quite reasonable. Especially when you consider the performance on tap.
 
Last edited:

kelvin 660

Member
Aug 21, 2020
242
149
Stonehouse
In summary, my day return journey was 340 real miles, started with 99%, topped up 69kW (8 + 61), finished with 20%. Total damage £20.01 (supercharger).

Total kw used = 99 - 20 + 8 + 61 = 140 kw
Therefore 140 kw / 340 miles = 412 wh/mile (2.43 mile/kw)
That does seem a bit high! You must have been driving into a head wind both ways...
 

GRiLLA

Member
Jul 5, 2020
833
788
UK
Total kw used = 99 - 20 + 8 + 61 = 140 kw
Therefore 140 kw / 340 miles = 412 wh/mile (2.43 mile/kw)
That does seem a bit high! You must have been driving into a head wind both ways...
Might be mixing percentages and KWH there

Total KWH used = (99-20/100)*73 +8+61 = 126.67KWH
Therefore 128.25/340 miles = 373WH/mile

that's still very high for a Model 3 P, on a motorway journey most get around 300WH/mile, as the OP did on the segments he could see the figures

Even with doing 80 (sorry 77 right 😉) for some of the journey I can't really see this being what we would expect, your average speed will be lower due to the roadworks, traffic etc. Given all this excess loss was on the first segment, that's pretty extreme.
 

GRiLLA

Member
Jul 5, 2020
833
788
UK
How can I calculate the total kW consumption for the whole trip? Is it possible to find this stats somewhere (I can only see data from the last charge and I did not note the data from my first part of the trip)? Is it stored somewhere that I can access (for free)? Or can I calculate this manually using the data above?

Was my first long drive battery experience normal or should I start worrying (I am already!)

I heard that I can check the battery health (depletion?) somehow somewhere. Where can I check it?
The car gives you data limited to what you see on the trip meter, the energy graph is also useful while on a journey to see if you are matching the cars expectation as you go considering terrain etc.

To get more data I use an app/service called TeslaFi, it's a web site that polls your car every few seconds so can build up huge data on your position, speed, battery level and loads of other things for every trip. It can compare an extrapolation of your battery vs other cars at the same mileage/part of the world/temperature but that's a pretty crude comparison. Others also exist such as TeslaMate and Tesla Stats. Here's an example of the data for a drive

1624356091479.png


and here's my battery compared to the average of other people using Teslafi at similar temperatures in europe.

1624356482658.png
 
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