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M3P vs MYP driving dynamics and ride quality

DayTrippin

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Supporting Member
Apr 30, 2021
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Park Cities, TX
I am torn between the M3P, MYP and MS LR (2021). Obviously, there are no 2021 MS to drive so I booked a test drive with my local Tesla dealer for a M3. They didn't tell me in advance if it was the M3 LR or M3P but it didn't matter. When I arrived it had been sold and they offered a MYP to drive.

So my question concerns the MYP and M3P similarities in driving dynamics, ride quality, and wind/road noise. When I drove the MYP obviously the acceleration was good. Braking wasn't bad and handling on smooth pavement was pretty good. As soon as there was any rough pavement, it all fell apart from both ride quality, driving dynamics and road noise. Hit a bump mid turn and while stayed pretty flat, it is obvious the suspension wasn't up to the task. It felt like a Cheap Chevy from 10 years ago. The tire didn't follow the road well. The road noise on some of the asphalt made me feel like there was no sound deadening at all in the car.

TBH - I don't think I could live with it long term like this given the roads I drive on without sinking a lot of money in upgrades. Thankfully my wife wasn't on the test drive or we wouldn't be looking at Teslas at all. She doesn't mind a performance tuned ride, she doesn't want one that punishes you. The noise would bother her more than me. I can't see buying a MYP and then swapping out wheels/tires, coilovers and doing a bunch of sound deadening.

So how close does the M3P mirror the MYP in these areas for those who have driven or owned both? Does the closed trunk area of the M3P keep it quieter and less drumming from the rear wheel area? Does it skip over sharp edged bumps? At times the MYP felt like I was riding a hardtail chopper. How is the overall noise level. The MYP seemed like a great option on paper until I drove it.

I am not looking for it to ride like an old Caddy. Just something comparable to the last decade from BMW, Audi or MB of their more sport oriented platforms. Is this realistic or not with the M3P? The Tesla dealer may have a M3 back later this week. I am not sure which version though but plan to drive it. Aside from less power, how similar are the M3 LR and the M3P in ride, drive, noise, etc. Thank you for any feedback or insight you can provide.
 

docsails

New Member
Apr 20, 2021
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93030
Recently bought an 2021 M3P.

Had put a deposit on an M3LR but after reading the acceleration smiles from Performance owners, changed my order.

I, too, was concerned about "firm" suspension, but have been quite pleased with everything after driving this car for about a month.

Honestly, I have a Shelby Hertz Mustang, and until recently a Mini Cooper Paceman, both which had a much harsher ride than my Tesla.

The ride is firm but compliant, handling wonderful and acceleration a gas (I know, bad analogy).

Recommend: Get the M3P!
 

jjrandorin

Moderator, Model 3, Tesla Energy Forums
Moderator
Nov 28, 2018
14,188
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Riverside Co. CA
the model 3 is not a quiet car on the inside. I dont find it unbearably noisy, but quiet, it isnt. Also, anything related to ride is completely 100000% subjective. One persons " rough" is another persons " sporty".

you will need to go test drive one and see. The model 3 handles better than the Y in my opinion, but the stock suspension does not absorb anything any better in one car than the other, in my opinion.
 

DayTrippin

Active Member
Supporting Member
Apr 30, 2021
1,363
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Park Cities, TX
Thanks for the info. I understand some of this is subjective. At the same harsh doesn't equal sporty. You can have sporty suspension that is well dampened and controlled without beating the car and you up. Years ago, many people thought that ultra-stiff was the way to go. I have several high performance vehicles that are much more supple, yet still well controlled with excellent driving dynamics than the MYP was. My BMW M3 is a great example of this.

The cockpit of the MYP wasn't overly noisy on good roads. As soon as I went over the older asphalt, it rumbled like a drum. There seemed to be a fair amount of harmonic resonance going on that seemed to amplify the sound. Hopefully, I can drive the M3P this week and do a back-to-back comparison.
 

raptor5244

Active Member
May 10, 2019
1,561
1,241
Florida
The M3P uses 20" Michelin PS4S tires, which I find quieter than my wife's SR+ with the 18" Primacy MXM4. Also make sure the tire pressures are set right. Sometimes they are set real high during shipping, which causes a rough ride. Noise level are subjective as well. Folks coming from a Jeep will think the Tesla is quiet as a mouse. Also, since there is no engine/exhaust noise the wind and tire noise can seem louder than what you are used to.
 

DayTrippin

Active Member
Supporting Member
Apr 30, 2021
1,363
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Park Cities, TX
Thanks, @raptor5244 , and those are good points that I did factor in. With only one sample it is hard to compare. I didn't have time to check the tire pressures. I'll check and see what tires or on the M3 when I drive it.

We have an electric Ford now my wife uses it as a commuter car. It is pretty quiet inside and had less road noise than the MYP. Not saying it is a better car but it is definitely a quieter car. That is one of the reasons seriously looking at a Tesla now is how good our experience has been with the Ford. Over 90k miles and no real issues other than a display problem.

The stock uberturbine wheels look heavy as heck. That isn't doing anything for ride quality or acceleration. Definitely hurting the ride quality as well but maybe not as bad as on a lighter car. The ratio of unsprung to sprung weight would definitely be helped by lighter wheels. I just started reading some of the threads for the wheel options and they were even heavier than I thought.

A quick question about your M3P as you are in Florida. People tend to drive pretty fast there on highways from my experience. Assuming you are running 75 - 80 mph on the highway, what kind of range are you typically seeing? If you start with at least 90% SOC, can you realistically make at least 200 miles on a hot 90F day running the AC?
 

jjrandorin

Moderator, Model 3, Tesla Energy Forums
Moderator
Nov 28, 2018
14,188
17,901
Riverside Co. CA
Thanks, @raptor5244 , and those are good points that I did factor in. With only one sample it is hard to compare. I didn't have time to check the tire pressures. I'll check and see what tires or on the M3 when I drive it.

We have an electric Ford now my wife uses it as a commuter car. It is pretty quiet inside and had less road noise than the MYP. Not saying it is a better car but it is definitely a quieter car. That is one of the reasons seriously looking at a Tesla now is how good our experience has been with the Ford. Over 90k miles and no real issues other than a display problem.

The stock uberturbine wheels look heavy as heck. That isn't doing anything for ride quality or acceleration. Definitely hurting the ride quality as well but maybe not as bad as on a lighter car. The ratio of unsprung to sprung weight would definitely be helped by lighter wheels. I just started reading some of the threads for the wheel options and they were even heavier than I thought.

A quick question about your M3P as you are in Florida. People tend to drive pretty fast there on highways from my experience. Assuming you are running 75 - 80 mph on the highway, what kind of range are you typically seeing? If you start with at least 90% SOC, can you realistically make at least 200 miles on a hot 90F day running the AC?

Running the AC isnt much of an issue. You would get 200 miles driving 75-80 running the AC on a model 3P. Running the Heat, on the other hand (in the winter) likely no on "200 mile range at 80MPH running the heat".
 

DayTrippin

Active Member
Supporting Member
Apr 30, 2021
1,363
1,564
Park Cities, TX
Thanks for the insight. I am in Florida so thankfully only about 4-6 weeks I might actually use heat in the car. We may relocate though so that is really useful info. Obviously, all the tricks like preheating while plugged in and trying to just use heated seats could help.

Does the M3 have a gauge showing you how much energy consumption for heating or cooling?
 

jjrandorin

Moderator, Model 3, Tesla Energy Forums
Moderator
Nov 28, 2018
14,188
17,901
Riverside Co. CA
Thanks for the insight. I am in Florida so thankfully only about 4-6 weeks I might actually use heat in the car. We may relocate though so that is really useful info. Obviously, all the tricks like preheating while plugged in and trying to just use heated seats could help.

Does the M3 have a gauge showing you how much energy consumption for heating or cooling?

No it doesnt show you specifically how much energy for heating or cooling. There is a wh/mi gauge that shows overall energy use while driving, though.
 

raptor5244

Active Member
May 10, 2019
1,561
1,241
Florida
Thanks, @raptor5244 , and those are good points that I did factor in. With only one sample it is hard to compare. I didn't have time to check the tire pressures. I'll check and see what tires or on the M3 when I drive it.

We have an electric Ford now my wife uses it as a commuter car. It is pretty quiet inside and had less road noise than the MYP. Not saying it is a better car but it is definitely a quieter car. That is one of the reasons seriously looking at a Tesla now is how good our experience has been with the Ford. Over 90k miles and no real issues other than a display problem.

The stock uberturbine wheels look heavy as heck. That isn't doing anything for ride quality or acceleration. Definitely hurting the ride quality as well but maybe not as bad as on a lighter car. The ratio of unsprung to sprung weight would definitely be helped by lighter wheels. I just started reading some of the threads for the wheel options and they were even heavier than I thought.

A quick question about your M3P as you are in Florida. People tend to drive pretty fast there on highways from my experience. Assuming you are running 75 - 80 mph on the highway, what kind of range are you typically seeing? If you start with at least 90% SOC, can you realistically make at least 200 miles on a hot 90F day running the AC?
I just took a trip last weekend which was mostly highway, Florida turnpike at around 75mph. I charged to 270 miles of range before I left and the trip was exactly 110 miles round trip. When I pulled into my garage I had 145 miles left on the gauge. So, I drove 110 actual miles but the used up 125 miles of range according to the gauge. It was about 90 degrees that day, AC was on, which as mentioned doesn't consume much energy. Not bad considering it was all highway and I did goose on the on-ramps a couple times. So, yeah I think you can get 200 miles as long as you are not tracking it or doing a 0-60 marathon. I have had the car a couple years and never had any range anxiety.

The 20" wheels are heavy but it is all about getting the more aggressive look for the performance trim and being able to clear the big brakes. I have an SR+ with the 18s and M3P with the 20s, the bigger wheels do look better to me as they fill out the wheel wells more. The 19s look fine to me as well. If you don't want/need the performance model the Dual Motor LR with 19s is a good compromise to get a bit more range. I am just a sucker for the max torque you can get.
 
Interesting, I hear nothing but good feedback on the PS4S tires. How do the P-Zeros compare?

No idea, just saw a new car with them. They're clearly narrower, but maybe they handle the limited camber of a stock Model 3 better? You can shred the MPS4's pretty easily if you drive it in anger.

Mixed reviews: some like them better, some worse. Sounds like your standard change to a car: https://www.reddit.com/r/teslamotors/comments/jitbdn
 

DayTrippin

Active Member
Supporting Member
Apr 30, 2021
1,363
1,564
Park Cities, TX
@raptor5244 - That kind of info is very helpful. I can't say I "need" the torque of the performance version but I am a sucker for quick vehicles. I am a pretty serious adrenaline junkie.

I have some ultra-quick motorcycles and my wife freaks out every time I want to take my daughter on one. So something like a M3P would be a good way to take her on something really quick without my wife freaking out. Not that I am going to ride crazily with my daughter on the back but she is a little adrenaline-infused child already. So this could be a great compromise.

Then again so would the 2021 MS LR. Which appears to be likely quicker than the M3P and has much better range. If I wasn't married I'd just skip to the MS Plaid and be done with it. If I did that my wife would likely have a meltdown. So I am trying to find the best bang for the buck under 100k which is our mutually agreed limit. Either that are sell a bike or two and buy the MS Plaid anyway. That is bordering a bit on overkill so I keep coming back to the M3P or a MS LR as the best all-around options. This forum has been really helpful to sharpen my thought process. I've realized that if I have to mod it a lot to like it, then I've likely bought the wrong car.
 

DayTrippin

Active Member
Supporting Member
Apr 30, 2021
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Park Cities, TX
Straightline acceleration is a high priority. Handling is also up there but not as many interesting roads where I live now to exploit. I also have to factor in child car seat as well and all the stuff that comes with lugging your kind around until they hit the teenage years. Thankfully we are way past the diapers stage but my wife wants to bring extras of everything. Still nice to have a stroller when the kid gets tired so we don't have to carry her on a hot day.

My wife's ideal car would likely be a MYP that rode and handled better with less noise. I would like quicker than the MYP so the M3P comes closer to what I want and the extra range would be a plus as well.
 

raptor5244

Active Member
May 10, 2019
1,561
1,241
Florida
Agreed, the feedback I hear is that the a model 3 is a lot more nimble than the model S, which makes it more fun to toss around. Based on your comments It sounds like you should get a Model 3 Performance. i have owned a lot of performance cars over the years and for street driving I really don’t desire anything quicker than the M3P. I think I have hit the limit. I mean this thing is a rocket on the street. Effortless power, instant throttle response, etc. You are so much faster than just about every other car on the road without even trying. Now performance at highway speed it still strong but the lack of gearing takes affect and the acceleration from say 100-130mph is not as strong as a high horsepower counterpart but where can you drive at those speeds without risking jail time anyway? The Tesla has more usable power down low where you spend most of the time driving. From an appearance perspective I think the Model S looks a little better but I don’t like anything else about it over the Model 3.

I would really prefer a sporty 2 door body, RWD only with a real LSD, 2 speed transmission for more linear acceleration and better 1/4 mile times. Sport Recaro type seats that hold you better, mag ride suspension and drive modes that relax the nannies. A HUD would also be a nice addition for those that like to track the car.
 

DayTrippin

Active Member
Supporting Member
Apr 30, 2021
1,363
1,564
Park Cities, TX
Your preference matches mine pretty closely. I grew up driving RWD cars and still enjoy them a lot. AWD is great for acceleration but I don't think the handling is as crisp. I drove the Taycan and really liked it but I think it is over priced and has very limited range.

Your comment on the useful performance envelope on the street really resonates with me. I had put a deposit on a V4 Ducati sportbike last year to replace a V-twin Ducati I had. Long story short, I canceled the deposit after about a month of waiting for the bike to get built and arrive. It all came down to how much could I really use the extra performance it would have over some of my other bikes on the street. The place where it was clearly superior over my v-twin version was going to be pretty much in excess of 130 mph. On the track, I could appreciate it, but on the street, I would likely end up in jail pretty quickly. Maybe great for bragging rights but I never cared about that much anyway.

The M3P does seem like a great all around choice for how I plan to use it. Other than it would be helpful if I could do some light towing with it. I have a small jetski trailer and it would be awesome if I could tow something 10-15 miles instead of getting out the SUV. Not far enough for range to be an issue. I guess the other wild card for me is how soon will any of the battery changes trickle down to the M3 like they are doing to the MYP.
 
You can make the M3P RWD with a single slider on the screen. It's way slower and ridiculously traction limited, but it's possible when you want a laugh. And of course AWD electrics aren't like AWD ICE cars because the front and rear axle aren't' mechanically connected at all.

The Tesla M3P is pretty capable in AutoX, which is lower steet-speed like handling. It's in super stock with Lotus Elises and Porsche GT3's. It's a ridiculously fast street car on real streets (the AWD helps here too).

In fairness, the Taycan is known for way over performing on range while the Teslas tend to underperform.

If you're the kind of person that will wonder/wait for something like the 4680 batteries, you'll never buy a Tesla. There's always something on the horizon. It's not always better. Some of the data is that a 2021 M3P is not as fast as a 2020.
 

dfwatt

Best Car Ever
Sep 24, 2018
3,462
5,647
FL
I am torn between the M3P, MYP and MS LR (2021). Obviously, there are no 2021 MS to drive so I booked a test drive with my local Tesla dealer for a M3. They didn't tell me in advance if it was the M3 LR or M3P but it didn't matter. When I arrived it had been sold and they offered a MYP to drive.

So my question concerns the MYP and M3P similarities in driving dynamics, ride quality, and wind/road noise. When I drove the MYP obviously the acceleration was good. Braking wasn't bad and handling on smooth pavement was pretty good. As soon as there was any rough pavement, it all fell apart from both ride quality, driving dynamics and road noise. Hit a bump mid turn and while stayed pretty flat, it is obvious the suspension wasn't up to the task. It felt like a Cheap Chevy from 10 years ago. The tire didn't follow the road well. The road noise on some of the asphalt made me feel like there was no sound deadening at all in the car.

TBH - I don't think I could live with it long term like this given the roads I drive on without sinking a lot of money in upgrades. Thankfully my wife wasn't on the test drive or we wouldn't be looking at Teslas at all. She doesn't mind a performance tuned ride, she doesn't want one that punishes you. The noise would bother her more than me. I can't see buying a MYP and then swapping out wheels/tires, coilovers and doing a bunch of sound deadening.

So how close does the M3P mirror the MYP in these areas for those who have driven or owned both? Does the closed trunk area of the M3P keep it quieter and less drumming from the rear wheel area? Does it skip over sharp edged bumps? At times the MYP felt like I was riding a hardtail chopper. How is the overall noise level. The MYP seemed like a great option on paper until I drove it.

I am not looking for it to ride like an old Caddy. Just something comparable to the last decade from BMW, Audi or MB of their more sport oriented platforms. Is this realistic or not with the M3P? The Tesla dealer may have a M3 back later this week. I am not sure which version though but plan to drive it. Aside from less power, how similar are the M3 LR and the M3P in ride, drive, noise, etc. Thank you for any feedback or insight you can provide.

There are a lot of problems with the stock suspension and Wheel and Tire compliment on both performance models. First of all the stock performance wheels are boat anchors on both the Model 3 and the Model Y. They are just massively heavy and at the same time rather brittle and easily deformed, something that happens with alarming frequency in areas with lots of potholes and other road hazards, as many owners on the Forum will readily attest. In addition, the stock performance suspension is both floaty due to lack of shock control, and at the same time harsh. This may be coming in part from Tesla's decision to go with the p-zero tire which combined with the very heavy Wheels makes for a less than great ride, but there is a contribution also coming from how the stock suspension frequently gets into the bump stops. That combined with the poor shock control yields a car that sort of pogos over bumps, and feels light and disconnected in the rear end at higher speeds. Not a great combination.

So between the high unsprung weight, the movement to an inferior tire from the class leading Michelin Pilot Sport 4S and the poor shock absorption particularly rebound, the car is far from the best it could be. Almost everybody here who was serious about getting the best performance from the car has gone with a coilover kit. The Mountain Pass Comfort kit which is adjustable sounds like it would be your first choice. I've driven the Model Y Performance and although its handling and acceleration were pretty decent given the vehicle's weight, the difference in handling between that and the Model 3P is significant. There's just no mistaking the extra 400 lb of mass. So I believe if you want the best ride handling combination possible along with the most responsive performance for sure your best choice is the model 3 Performance, replacing the stock suspension with the MPP coilover kit, and getting a lighter set of forged wheels. I would just sell the Uber turbines with the P Zeros and get the Pilot Sport 4S in the Tesla spec. Combination of all these changes will literally transform the car.

Since you're in Jacksonville if you're ever in the Port Charlotte Area, swing by and I can give you a test drive in my heavily modified model 3 Performance. You can see for yourself
 
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