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Massive difference in 100D vs 75D charging times?

Hello, I was just planning a summer trip for my 75D (in production) with family. It would be starting in Houston, routing through grand canyon and las vegas, along with other minor stops along the way. I used EV trip planner website and noticed that it said charging time would be approximately 15-17 hours, which was about half of the actual driving time. Out of curiosity, I switched to a 100D MX and the charging time dropped to about 7 hours. How is there such a drastic difference? Did I make a mistake buying a 75D? Or is it just a glitch in the website?
 
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Cowby

S E X C R
Jun 2, 2015
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130
ATL, GA
Yes, you made a mistake....always buy the biggest battery....but we’ve all come to that conclusion after driving EV’s for a while.

I’m hoping Tesla will release reasonably price upgradaeable batteries as battery costs comes down further....maybe like 150 kWh size in same form factor? 450-500 mile range would surely be the death knell for ICE.
 
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chillaban

Active Member
May 5, 2016
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Bay Area
The estimate is not wrong — the top 20% of the battery pack is horribly painful to supercharge because of tapering. If you need, for example, 250 rated miles to get to your next charger, going from 200 to 250 in a 100D might only take 10 minutes but it’ll take an hour or more in a 75.....

If you take frequent road trips the bigger battery is well worth the money. But if you only rarely go on trips, it makes a lot of sense to save money by getting a smaller battery pack.


I always try to tell prospective shoppers to think of charging times, not just range. Everyone is focused on the question of “will I be able to make it to ____” rather than “how long will it take”
 
We have a 60d, but in southern California there are chargers everywhere so we don't typically drain our battery very low .It is technically a 75d so it does charge fast, about an hour for entire battery but if we take a short break every 120 miles or so, it charges in like 30 min. Honestly to go to the bathroom, Get coffee, etc i feel like we stop and are back on the road before I am ready. Maybe also because we have 2 kids, but stopping is refreshing. We don't take tons of long road trips though so if you dont, you'll be fine but if you take a lot then maybe the extra cost is worth it.

Just don't skimp on autopilot for the primary car! It will be a lifesaver for your road trip, makes it so much easier!
 
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shouldn't be that much of a difference. make sure you have the start at 100%, speed at 75mph, reference consumption at 350 (my highway solo is around 300 but with full car maybe 350), and both arrival charges at 10%

i show houston to vegas one way 6:10 with x75 and 4:14 with x100... only a 2 hour difference

maybe plan your small town stops better
 
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whitex

Well-Known Member
Sep 30, 2015
6,922
8,839
Seattle area, WA
You can always make more money....time on the other hand, not so much.
That is only true if you don't work for your money. Otherwise just quit your job and you just made yourself 40 hrs per week or more (in lieu of money of course, but as you say, you can always make more). For most people, time has a money equivalent (you might have heard the expression "time is money").
 
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whitex

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Sep 30, 2015
6,922
8,839
Seattle area, WA
Yes, you made a mistake....always buy the biggest battery....but we’ve all come to that conclusion after driving EV’s for a while.

Not true at all. I have been driving Tesla's sine 2013. Our 4th one is coming by end of this month and it's an S75D. Would an S100D be nice, sure, but is it necessary or even worth $20K, not even close for us. The S75D actually has a higher rated mileage than P85D which I drove the P85D coast to coast and back not long ago without any issues.

What battery you need depends purely on your needs. There is no hard and fast rule to buy the biggest. It could be a total waste of money for some people's driving patterns. You should always look at the driving needs and evaluate both the size of the battery and charging capabilities based on that. For example, say you drive 180 miles in the morning, then come home for few hours, then drive 180 miles in the afternoon. A 100KWh battery doesn't do the trick to live through the day without charging (especially in the winter). A high powered charger on the other hand does the trick for an S75D. Prior to the P85D I drove an S60. In the 2 years of ownership, the battery size was only an issue (requiring to change my plans) twice, but guess what, I would have needed an S130 to avoid changing plans - I remember thinking "this sucks a bit, but even if I had the largest battery size it would not help me AT ALL - today by the way even the 60 would have been fine as there are more superchargers around).

Bottom line; evaluate your driving needs before deciding on the battery size. Of course remember that the Model X is the "gus gazzler" equivalent in the EV world, so for example for us an S75D does just fine even in the winter for us, however X75D would not have worked as well (the 180+180 miles daily driving pattern I mentioned earlier is something my wife does occasionally). If your driving needs including towing, make sure you consider that in your energy consumption calculations too.
 

Cowby

S E X C R
Jun 2, 2015
605
130
ATL, GA
Not true at all. I have been driving Tesla's sine 2013. Our 4th one is coming by end of this month and it's an S75D. Would an S100D be nice, sure, but is it necessary or even worth $20K, not even close for us. The S75D actually has a higher rated mileage than P85D which I drove the P85D coast to coast and back not long ago without any issues.

What battery you need depends purely on your needs. There is no hard and fast rule to buy the biggest. It could be a total waste of money for some people's driving patterns. You should always look at the driving needs and evaluate both the size of the battery and charging capabilities based on that. For example, say you drive 180 miles in the morning, then come home for few hours, then drive 180 miles in the afternoon. A 100KWh battery doesn't do the trick to live through the day without charging (especially in the winter). A high powered charger on the other hand does the trick for an S75D. Prior to the P85D I drove an S60. In the 2 years of ownership, the battery size was only an issue (requiring to change my plans) twice, but guess what, I would have needed an S130 to avoid changing plans - I remember thinking "this sucks a bit, but even if I had the largest battery size it would not help me AT ALL - today by the way even the 60 would have been fine as there are more superchargers around).

Bottom line; evaluate your driving needs before deciding on the battery size. Of course remember that the Model X is the "gus gazzler" equivalent in the EV world, so for example for us an S75D does just fine even in the winter for us, however X75D would not have worked as well (the 180+180 miles daily driving pattern I mentioned earlier is something my wife does occasionally). If your driving needs including towing, make sure you consider that in your energy consumption calculations too.

I knew I should have put a “lol” in there to show jest. I was only half kidding, but as has been said many times, no one said “darn, I wished I had gotten the smaller battery” when traveling.

I do agree with u that it depends on the persons needs, but I ascribe to the motto of “buy the biggest battery u can afford”. The “P” is just for pleasure.
 
For planning I’ve used A Better Routeplanner.com. Plug in the values and see the difference. Those values seem inflated. And remember the times at charge points vary. Meaning if at one stop you can save 20 minutes between a 100D vs 75D, well if you’re having a cup of coffee or grabbing a bite, etc are you going to realize the difference?

You saved a big bag of cash on the 75 battery, don’t sweat the small stuff.
 
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I'm actually not in a rush. In fact, I'd rather stop more and enjoy what's around. In a way, I appreciate that the 75D will "force" me to do that. However, while making the decision of 75 vs 100, I thought the 60 or so mile difference in range would only make a difference if I was making a long stretch in a place with limited supercharger access (or none at all).
I think I'll stick with the 75, just because I don't mind waiting for an extra 25 minutes, and an extra few stops along the way, as well as just saving cash in general.
My shock (and doubt in my decision) came from the fact that "just 60 more miles of range" made such a huge difference in total charging time
 
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The charge time difference is “wrong” in the sense that charging takes the same amount of time...if you are doing something else.

Assuming you stay somewhere you can plug in each night, you just nuetralized the time penalty of the 75’s taper once everyday.
Both vehicles take the 10 seconds it takes to plug them in to fully charge.

If you are trying to rip through miles on a tight timeline then the 100 wins no doubt.

On a trip when you charge overnight and have a long lunch, for example, you just nuetralized the taper twice each day.

Also, if a route has dense Supercharger spacing, around every 100 miles, it is very easy to only charge at the faster rates. Say you want a 30% buffer. You are only charging to 130 miles, and the 75 is still fast at that low state of charge.

Superchargers are only going to get more numerous and that makes battery size less, although still, relevant.
 
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whitex

Well-Known Member
Sep 30, 2015
6,922
8,839
Seattle area, WA
I knew I should have put a “lol” in there to show jest. I was only half kidding, but as has been said many times, no one said “darn, I wished I had gotten the smaller battery” when traveling.

I do agree with u that it depends on the persons needs, but I ascribe to the motto of “buy the biggest battery u can afford”. The “P” is just for pleasure.
I still wouldn't quiet agree with "buy the biggest battery you can afford". Unless literally money is no object, spending $20K+ on a battery capacity you'll never use still implies you can't spend the same $20K on a nice trip or some other indulgence. So, unless you are a trust fund baby, really large lottery winner, or got billions in inheritance, you may be able to afford a lot of things but not all at the same time, so picking which ones you choose to spend money on is the key to getting the most out of the money you have.
 
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