TMC is an independent, primarily volunteer organization that relies on ad revenue to cover its operating costs. Please consider whitelisting TMC on your ad blocker and becoming a Supporting Member. For more info: Support TMC
Start a Discussionhttps://teslamotorsclub.com/tmc/tags/

Math on driving faster than you can charge

Discussion in 'Model S: Battery & Charging' started by Manzacoty, Dec 27, 2016.

  1. Manzacoty

    Manzacoty Member

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2016
    Messages:
    203
    Location:
    Dallas
    I'm trying to come up with a formula for the most ideal speed to drive to minimize charging times. For example, if you were plugging into 110V and only gaining 3 miles/hour - it would make sense to slow down and save as much range as possible. Obviously if your next stop is a SC - then speed wouldn't be as big of a factor.

    I'm having a hard time figuring out the formula/math. Any of you geniuses know the formula for that?

    Thanks!
     
  2. ItsNotAboutTheMoney

    ItsNotAboutTheMoney Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2012
    Messages:
    5,584
    Location:
    Maine
    The amount of energy you'll use varies depending on a number of different factors. If you've ever used EVtripplanner you'll see that there's a bunch of parameters that affect energy use, in addition to elevation changes and speed on the route.
     
  3. scottf200

    scottf200 Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2013
    Messages:
    1,562
    Location:
    Chicagoland ModelX S603
    #3 scottf200, Dec 27, 2016
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2016
    • Like x 1
  4. animorph

    animorph Member

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2016
    Messages:
    480
    Location:
    Scottsdale, AZ
    1) Create an equation that describes the charging time for any starting SoC and desired final SoC. There are some charging curves that have been posted. Charging is faster at lower SoC's, so it's a non-trivial curve matching exercise.

    2) Create an equation the describes the energy usage (for various conditions?) at various travel speeds, for the car of interest. I've seen less info about this online, though Tesla's Model S page has a nice "calculator" for some simple conditions. Elevation changes, temperature, wind speed, car configuration and settings all contribute to energy usage, among others.

    3) Combine the two equations to describe the total trip time.

    EVTripPlanner.com does a good job of this.
    Another thread:
    How to save a lot of time on long trips
     
    • Like x 1
  5. Manzacoty

    Manzacoty Member

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2016
    Messages:
    203
    Location:
    Dallas
    • Like x 1

Share This Page