TMC is an independent, primarily volunteer organization that relies on ad revenue to cover its operating costs. Please consider whitelisting TMC on your ad blocker or making a Paypal contribution here: paypal.me/SupportTMC

Mileage Range Test Drive for 2,000 ft Elevation Gain and Return Trip

Discussion in 'Model S' started by Velo1, Apr 14, 2013.

  1. Velo1

    Velo1 Member

    Joined:
    May 28, 2012
    Messages:
    197
    Location:
    Evergreen, Colorado, United States
    In preparation for the June 8th Mt Evans Road Rally, I test drove the first 10 miles from Idaho Springs, CO, which was a 2,000 ft elevation gain straight up hill. I have a 85kWh Model S, and here are my results:

    Start: elevation 7807 ft., my mileage range at 236
    At 10-mile marker, elevation 9807 ft, my mileage range at 210
    Return: elevation 7807 ft., my mileage range at 210 (yes, that's correct)

    The grade is a steady 6% uphill without any breaks, and I drove the speed limit 35-40 mph. The first 7 miles are fairly straight road, but then there are multiple switchbacks between the 7-10 mile markers.

    In summary, I used 2.6 miles of range per 1 mile driven uphill, and then did not use or lose any mileage on the return trip.

    Presently I have 23 RSVPs for the upcoming event, and for those unaware or still interested in joining us, here are the details:

    http://www.esion.com/Files/Mt_Evans_Road_Rally.pdf
     
  2. Cheerose

    Cheerose Member

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2013
    Messages:
    161
    Location:
    Fort Lauderdale, FL
    In reading other threads, that sounds about right.
    You'll lose 7 miles of range for every 1,000' increase of elevation. You"ll gain 4 miles for every 1,000' decrease.
     
  3. Velo1

    Velo1 Member

    Joined:
    May 28, 2012
    Messages:
    197
    Location:
    Evergreen, Colorado, United States
    I should have mentioned it was 40F outside temperature, I had the cabin temp set to 71F, driver-side seat heater at setting #1, stereo playing, and daylight run ing lights on.

    Keep in mind this was not a scientific test, but a practical real-world test as I would typically drive this course.
     
  4. huntjo

    huntjo Member

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2012
    Messages:
    543
    Location:
    Fort Collins, Colorado
    Went to Winter Park last weekend on my first Model S road trip.

    Left Fort Collins with 250 rated miles ( i had driven to work and around town before leaving after a range charge the night before).
    Drove to Denver through rush hour traffic to pick up my friend at the Rockies game. We had snowboards, helmets, groceries, clothes and gear for three people in the car and had the right back seat folded down to fit the long stuff. I also brought a laptop and some folders to try to do some work in the condo, but that never actually occured due to the presence of a hot tub. (*side note: if you know how to ski, you do not know enough to "figure out" snowboarding. Totally different. Ask my acromioclavicular joint.*).

    We drove out of Denver and stopped in Golden to grab a quite to eat bite since it was about 7pm. There were a few dinky restaurants nearby and we settled on a Jack in the Box to keep it quick, since we didn't really need too much range, I just wanted to see what it was like charging in the wild. There were two 30 amp free Chargepoint chargers at Kohl's. Free is nice, but 30 amps would not be my ideal charging situation, unless you are staying somewhere for several hours. I believe in 45 minutes we got like 15 miles of range added.

    *side note: I had called ahead to the RV park in IDaho Springs which supposedly has 50amp service and will just charge by the electric meter rather than by the day. I think that is going to be a really good resource for anyone making the Mt. Evans trip. Unfortunately, the proprietor was only willing to meet me there before dark, so we chose the 30amp charger at Kohl's instead. Another option would have been a 30amp at Walgreen's, and I think there were a few more along I 70 in the 'burbs of Denver/ Golden but don't recall where. *

    We then headed up I 70 into the mountains, and I would say I mostly dove 65 instead of speeding like usual, in an effort to try to retain plenty of range so I didn't worry my non-EV crazy passengers. We had the climate control on and were quite comfortable at 70 degrees. When we got to Berthoud pass it started snowing, and the roads were actually fairly icy at this point so we slowed down significantly for the switchbacks. Predictably range dropped a bit faster, and we only had 78 rated miles left at approximately the top of the pass. Luckily the rest was downhill and we actually arrived at the condo with still 78 miles reading on the battery. The temperature when we left was in the high 60's but by this time was around 29-30 F. I think the range loss was more due to altitude rather than cold, but this is a reason it would be nice to have a detailed report of where the energy is going: HVAC, battery pack heating, driving, etc.

    The condo actually charged for covered (and heated) parking, but i think since they had arranged a spot next to a 110v socket they were all distracted and just let us park for free. We could walk to the lifts, so we basically charged uninterrupted for 40 hours or so, and the range when we left was about 215 i think. *Funny story about that: when we were planning this trip I had found an article through the Googles that said in 2011 the city of Winter Park installed 6 free electric vehicle chargers around the city. I was pretty lackadasical about actually packing and prepping for the trip, so it was about 24 hour before we left that I was trying to hunt down the exact locations of these on chargepoint, recargo, and just plain google searching. Turns out, there is a Winter Park Florida. Luckily the condo management was so accomodating, or I would have had to drive a stinky ICE car on my adventure (or camp at the Idaho Springs RV park over night in at least one direction of the trip).

    A much warmer drive home Sunday afternoon was easily done at normal 65-80mph speeds all the way home to Ft. Collins ended a perfect roda trip with over a hundred remaining rated miles on the dash once we got home.

    Stats:
    Friday: 131 miles from Ft. Collins through Denver to Winter Park, rising from 5000ft to 9000 feet over an 11,300 ft. snowy winding mountain pass. Start temperature 69, end temperature 29. Climate control and radio at comfortable levels, speed limits exceeded in the low lands, but no speeding once I was in the mountains. Total 52.1 kWh used, averaging 397Wh/mi.
    Sunday: 125 miles back home without the Denver detour. Temperature was 50F and above. Lots of downhill, and a little more exceeding the speed limit. 29.8 kWh used, averaging 238 Wh/mi.

    I think a Supercharger in Golden would be a fairly awesome location. Are you listening, Tesla?
     
  5. Velo1

    Velo1 Member

    Joined:
    May 28, 2012
    Messages:
    197
    Location:
    Evergreen, Colorado, United States
    I am not sure how altitude would affect an EV, but a Super Charger at the 1-70/Morrison exit in Golden is a perfect location for traveling to and from the mountains.
     
  6. ChadS

    ChadS Petroleum is for sissies

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2009
    Messages:
    2,399
    Hey Velo,

    I understand you weren't trying to be scientific, but thanks for the numbers as I like to verify my range calculations (HERE) when I can.

    Given your low speeds (35 - 40), I would expect you to outperform range miles by about 33%. But the low temperatures (40) should lower that to about 23%. The trip was 20 miles, so I would have expected you to use 15.4 miles of range if it was flat.

    But you went up 2k feet. That costs about 20 miles (it would only be 14 for a roadster, but the model s is much heavier). Then when you came down you would have gained back about 12, so the net cost would be 8 miles. So we are at 23.4 range miles expected to be consumed. I would stick with those figures for a long trip, but given this was only 20 miles, I would expect consumption to be a little higher as the HVAC load is generally heavier at the start. Unfortunately I have not done any work to try to model that.

    So my guess is that you would have consumed "a little more" than 23.4 miles, and you report using 26. That is pretty good.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Now trying huntjo's trip. 131 miles, varied speeds, varied temps from 69-29, some stuff on roads in places, over 6k of elevation gain followed by over 2k of elevation loss.

    This will be rough because of the variation, but let's subtract 10% for temperature, and assume speed variations average out to no effect. So we are up to 144 consumed. Going up cost you 60 miles, but you got back 12 coming down. So 192 range miles expected to be consumed. You started with 250, added 15 at a charger, and arrived with 78. So you actually consumed 187.
     
  7. huntjo

    huntjo Member

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2012
    Messages:
    543
    Location:
    Fort Collins, Colorado
    Love the calculations! My ultimate EV road trip from Ft. Collins to Steamboat was nixed by the wife due to (her) range anxiety. I think with my success on this shorter trip, along with some healthy data preparation, I can convince her it's a good idea.
     
  8. vfx

    vfx Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2006
    Messages:
    14,792
    Location:
    CA CA
    EVs hum, ICEs suck.
     

Share This Page