TMC is an independent, primarily volunteer organization that relies on ad revenue to cover its operating costs. Please consider whitelisting TMC on your ad blocker or making a Paypal contribution here: paypal.me/SupportTMC

Miles/charge time?

Discussion in 'Model S: Battery & Charging' started by mleskovar, Apr 15, 2011.

  1. mleskovar

    mleskovar Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2010
    Messages:
    8
    Location:
    So. Cal.
    Some charge questions:
    - Is charge time linear regardless of charge state?
    - I came up with 4 miles per hour of charge at 110V & 15A....sound right?
    - How about at 230V and 30A?
    Sorry if this has been covered, I searched but couldn't find it.
     
  2. richkae

    richkae VIN587

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2008
    Messages:
    1,917
  3. TEG

    TEG TMC Moderator

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2006
    Messages:
    17,249
    Location:
    Silicon Valley
    #3 TEG, Apr 15, 2011
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2011
    Some more napkin calculations to cross reference against yours, assuming current draw is limited to 80% of breaker capacity:

    NEMA5-15 [email protected]=1.4kW... ~48 hour full charge... ~220 mile range / ~48 hours = ~4MPH.
    NEMA6-30 [email protected]=5.7kW... ~10 hour full charge... ~220 mile range / ~10 hours = ~22MPH

    Tesla chart:
    Universal Adapters - Available in North America Only (charging) Tesla Motors
    [​IMG]
     
  4. mleskovar

    mleskovar Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2010
    Messages:
    8
    Location:
    So. Cal.
    Thanks! TS's blog has some interesting stats and shows that it's a moving target. The Adapter Charge Times chart answers the M/hr. question for a full charge.
     
  5. TEG

    TEG TMC Moderator

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2006
    Messages:
    17,249
    Location:
    Silicon Valley
    Actually looking at the chart, it is breaker rating, not actual current draw, so this is more correct:

    NEMA5-15 120V@12A=1.4kW... ~48 hour full charge... ~220 mile range / ~48 hours = ~4MPH.
    NEMA6-30 240V@24A=5.7kW... ~10 hour full charge... ~220 mile range / ~10 hours = ~22MPH
     
  6. PaulM

    PaulM Member

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2008
    Messages:
    107
    Location:
    Ottawa, Canada
    What about 30A RV plugs (30A @ 120v - TT30R)? If I remember correctly the roadster can only draw 15A @ 120V. I wonder if it is because that is the maximum it can draw at 120v or is it only limited by the UMC. 30A (120v) plugs are quite common in parks and it would a waste to only pull 15A. Charging a completely depleted battery would take 13h less if it could pull 24A (80% of 30A) instead of 15A.
     
  7. TEG

    TEG TMC Moderator

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2006
    Messages:
    17,249
    Location:
    Silicon Valley
    #7 TEG, Apr 17, 2011
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2011
    Good question. I don't know the answer, although we had some discussion of TT-30 before:
    Campground charging
    Campground charging
    Charging the Roadster

    Apparently, if you use the MC120, I don't think there is a pilot signal, so the Roadster isn't willing to go higher than 15amps.

    NEMA14-50: How much current can you pull?
    I recall at some point there was some discussion of trying to create a TT-30 plug with the diode or resistor in the twist lock that would convince a UMC or RFMC to send a 24amp pilot signal to the Roadster. I don't know if anyone ever made one of those, or if it would actually work to do [email protected]

    RV supply places make TT-30 to NEMA14-50 adapter boxes. You might be able to re-wire one, and plug a MC240/UMC/RFMC into it to get [email protected] (Has anyone tried that?)
    Amazon.com: GenTran 10/3 30 Amp TT-30 RV Plug to 50 Amp 125/250 Volt NEMA 1450 Receptacle Generator Adapter RJBATT30-1450R: Patio, Lawn Garden
    31UpePNjh8L._SS500_.jpg
     
  8. stopcrazypp

    stopcrazypp Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2007
    Messages:
    7,038
    NEC 625 only makes an exception for "125 volt, single phase, 15 or 20 amperes". The 30 amp will require the same kind of signaling as any 240V source. This requirement will apply to J1772 equipped vehicles too (which means the 120V cord in the Leaf and Volt won't be able to use the 30 amps either).
     

Share This Page