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Miles Lost Not Equal to Miles Driven?

I'm a first-time EV owner, so pardon my ignorance regarding this topic.

Yesterday, I left my house with a 90% charge, and my SR Model Y indicated I had 222 miles of range. During that trip, I drove a total of 107.1 miles, at 241 Wh/mi, and 26 kWh consumed, and I ended up back at my house with 89 miles of range left, meaning I drove about 107.1 miles, but lost 133 in range.

I assume this is normal, and that the 222 miles of range is merely an estimate of what I might expect in perfect conditions?

If it matters, the trip was mostly highway driving, and I generally set the cruise control between 72 and 75 mph. In addition, the first half of the drive was uphill, so I saw much higher energy usage, whereas the drive home was on a decline. I had the HVAC set to auto at 72 degrees.
 
I assume this is normal, and that the 222 miles of range is merely an estimate of what I might expect in perfect conditions?

Yup. The same happens in a gas car we just don't normally pay as much attention. If you drive faster/more aggressively you'll use more energy. Temperature, wind, elevation, and other factors also contribute. It is a bit more dramatic in an electric car though.

Conversely, if you were to drive slower, you could go 200 miles while only using, say, 190 miles of range :)
 
Hi @JLOC you may want to do some more reading here as well as in the general Model Y area as there are tons of threads on range. In short, yes the "222" you're seeing is based solely on your remaining SOC (state of charge--how much % of your usable battery charge remains) times the EPA estimated range number. It does not take into consideration the myriad of factors that affect your range, including but not limited to: ambient temperature, wind conditions, elevation changes on your route, speed factors (aerodynamic drag increases exponentially as your speed increases), your driving style (heavy footed or light footed), and other factors. So, the actual range you can expect is complex but generally expect it to be less than what the EPA number would indicate.

There are alternative ways to get a more accurate estimate or your actual range remaining, such as using the Energy app, or using the navigation to set a destination (and it will show you your estimated % remaining when you arrive), and these take into account at least some of the variables I noted above, but can't possibly predict or handle every factor.
 
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Yup. The same happens in a gas car we just don't normally pay as much attention. If you drive faster/more aggressively you'll use more energy. Temperature, wind, elevation, and other factors also contribute. It is a bit more dramatic in an electric car though.

Conversely, if you were to drive slower, you could go 200 miles while only using, say, 190 miles of range :)
Hi @JLOC you may want to do some more reading here as well as in the general Model Y area as there are tons of threads on range. In short, yes the "222" you're seeing is based solely on your remaining SOC (state of charge--how much % of your usable battery charge remains) times the EPA estimated range number. It does not take into consideration the myriad of factors that affect your range, including but not limited to: ambient temperature, wind conditions, elevation changes on your route, speed factors (aerodynamic drag increases exponentially as your speed increases), your driving style (heavy footed or light footed), and other factors. So, the actual range you can expect is complex but generally expect it to be less than what the EPA number would indicate.

There are alternative ways to get a more accurate estimate or your actual range remaining, such as using the Energy app, or using the navigation to set a destination (and it will show you your estimated % remaining when you arrive), and these take into account at least some of the variables I noted above, but can't possibly predict or handle every factor.
I think your conclusion is correct. Drop to 65-70mph, you might gain 5-10% of that range back. I think you're consuming more uphill than you're able to recover downhill.

Tire PSI? Ambient temp? (42psi for range, but I've settled on 38psi for comfort...19"s, ContiProContact.
Thank you all for your input. I clearly do need to do more reading on the topic, as I am obviously quite ignorant on the topic of range.

Again, thank you all for your input!
 
Thank you all for your input. I clearly do need to do more reading on the topic, as I am obviously quite ignorant on the topic of range.

Again, thank you all for your input!

@JLOC hopefully my reply didn't come across as condescending. What you're going through is a very typical experience for a first-time EV owner, which is why there are so many threads on it here! I should also add that I'm far form an expert, and am still a future Model Y owner at this point. Everything I know about the experience, I have learned from here (and/or watching far too many YouTube videos from Model Y owners and reviewers).
 
Or...use your time doing something constructive, rather than obsessing over your car (the way many of us do!) HAHAHA!
Amen.

I went through this exercise because I have owned my Y for a week, and this was the first time I took it on my long commute (~50 miles each way) to work. We had placed an order for the LR RWD, which still has not been made, but ended up getting a SR after the $2K price drop, even though I was anxious about the range, given my commute.

However, after this test run, I'm glad to see that the SR provides sufficient range for my needs, and I'm glad we didn't pay the extra $ for the LR AWD.
 
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@JLOC hopefully my reply didn't come across as condescending. What you're going through is a very typical experience for a first-time EV owner, which is why there are so many threads on it here! I should also add that I'm far form an expert, and am still a future Model Y owner at this point. Everything I know about the experience, I have learned from here (and/or watching far too many YouTube videos from Model Y owners and reviewers).
@srlawren - not at all! I totally got what you meant about the need to read up on this topic further.

Call it laziness on my part, as I was hoping someone could just give me the dumbed-down explanation without going into too much of the technical details of how EV's work (my eyes glaze over once people get too technical on the topic).
 
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jcanoe

Well-Known Member
Oct 2, 2020
5,555
6,112
Maryland
Your trip results are as expected. So now you know to expect ~190 miles of range from the SR Model Y. I would not recommend charging beyond 100% on a regular basis but for the occasional longer trip it would be fine. If you want to finesse a few extra miles of range make sure your tires are properly inflated to 42 PSI cold tire pressure reading. I prefer to keep my Model Y with 19" wheels and Continental ProContact RX tires 1 to 2 lbs above the recommended tire pressure. You have a built-in driving reserve if you adjust your highway speed down by 5 or even 10 MPH. The slow lane is fine, gets you to your destination with some additional battery charge you would otherwise not have. Use PlugShare to locate Level 2 charging stations (some are even free to use.) Even 1 hour of Level 2 charging before you start your return trip will add more than 20 miles of additional driving to your Tesla. You could also plan for a short stop at a SuperCharger.

Things that will force you to add charging stops to your trip include elevation changes, colder weather, rain, and head winds. For planning trips use A Better Route Planner.
 
  • Informative
Reactions: srlawren and JLOC
Your trip results are as expected. So now you know to expect ~190 miles of range from the SR Model Y. I would not recommend charging beyond 100% on a regular basis but for the occasional longer trip it would be fine. If you want to finesse a few extra miles of range make sure your tires are properly inflated to 42 PSI cold tire pressure reading. I prefer to keep my Model Y with 19" wheels and Continental ProContact RX tires 1 to 2 lbs above the recommended tire pressure. You have a built-in driving reserve if you adjust your highway speed down by 5 or even 10 MPH. The slow lane is fine, gets you to your destination with some additional battery charge you would otherwise not have. Use PlugShare to locate Level 2 charging stations (some are even free to use.) Even 1 hour of Level 2 charging before you start your return trip will add more than 20 miles of additional driving to your Tesla. You could also plan for a short stop at a SuperCharger.

Things that will force you to add charging stop to your trip include elevation changes, colder weather, rain, and head winds. For planning trips use A Better Route Planner.
Thanks for your input. Still learning a lot about the unique intricacies of being an ev owner.
 
Thanks for your input. Still learning a lot about the unique intricacies of being an ev owner.
Actually being a Tesla owner - most other EVs don't use the EPA rating but a similar method as ICE when calculating the remaining range. So based on your average mileage over the last N miles.

Of course there are pros and cons to either method, though it would have been nice if Tesla at least allowed you to switch to the other method IMHO (and it already does it in the energy display, so it should be trivial to show that number instead on the top of the main screen).
 
Here's the thing, though. I've driven on 50 mile trips where I've had an average Wh/mile of say 217Wh/mile (as noted on 'since last charge' display that shows distance as well as Whr/mile since last charge). This is well below the rated Whr/mile, yet the range indicated still drops more than 50 miles. Not sure what's going on here. I'm driving more efficiently than rated yet still the range miles drop more than miles traveled. And this is with heat and AC off.
 

jcanoe

Well-Known Member
Oct 2, 2020
5,555
6,112
Maryland
Here's the thing, though. I've driven on 50 mile trips where I've had an average Wh/mile of say 217Wh/mile (as noted on 'since last charge' display that shows distance as well as Whr/mile since last charge). This is well below the rated Whr/mile, yet the range indicated still drops more than 50 miles. Not sure what's going on here. I'm driving more efficiently than rated yet still the range miles drop more than miles traveled. And this is with heat and AC off.
What does the Range display indicate for 100% state of charge? (Using the Tesla phone app move charge limit slider control all of the way to the right while charging and the estimated range at 100% state of charge will be displayed.)

What is your usual charging routine? Do you charge to 70 or 80%, never charge above 90% or discharge below 50%?
 
"What does the Range display indicate for 100% state of charge? (Using the Tesla phone app move charge limit slider control all of the way to the right while charging and the estimated range at 100% state of charge will be displayed.)

What is your usual charging routine? Do you charge to 70 or 80%, never charge above 90% or discharge below 50%?"

The 100% range as indicated on the phone app varies between 300 and 304. I have just over 11,000 miles on my Y, which I purchased new in May, 2021. Usual charging is to 80%, with higher limits for an upcoming trip. It's not uncommon for me to discharge down to 20%. I only supercharge on trips. My lifetime Whr/mile over 11,000 miles is 237 Whr/mile. I drive gently.
 

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