Welcome to Tesla Motors Club
Discuss Tesla's Model S, Model 3, Model X, Model Y, Cybertruck, Roadster and More.
Register
  • TMC Podcast #11 will stream live Saturday at 1PM PDT. We will be joined by special guest JT Stukes, a former engineer at Tesla. You can watch it live and participate in the chat on YouTube. We will addressing viewer comments and questions. For more information, follow the TMC Podcast #11 thread.

Mini Solar Charger System to just Charge my Tesla S75D

David.85D

Active Member
Oct 29, 2016
1,622
1,394
USA
A 2 to 2.5 kW solar setup would work, depending on what you assume for average daily hours of useable sun. We average 4.5 hours here (average over the whole year). Do you want it to continue working on the shortest day of winter, or just an average day?

30 miles range is about 10 KWh. One powerwall is 13.5 KWh nominal. Should need just one powerwall to store that much energy.
 

BerTX

Active Member
Supporting Member
May 2, 2014
3,508
3,657
Texas/Washington
This is true but for OP's reference, PA is among the states that require appointed utilities to allow net metering.
Hmm. The DSIRE website says this:
"It is important to note that electric generation suppliers (EGSs) in Pennsylvania are permitted but not required to offer net metering."

That was from 2017, so maybe it has changed.
 
Hmm. The DSIRE website says this:
"It is important to note that electric generation suppliers (EGSs) in Pennsylvania are permitted but not required to offer net metering."

That was from 2017, so maybe it has changed.

My understanding is that ESGs are alternative suppliers you can opt into buying from. The next sentence gets at this ("Thus, customers who choose an electricity supplier other than their utility or Default Service Provider (DSP) must check with the supplier to see if it offers net metering service.") I think what they're saying is that appointed utilities must offer net metering, but if you make special arrangements with a third party provider, then net metering availability is between you and that third party.
 
  • Informative
Reactions: BerTX
Net metering is the key here... think the electrical grid as a big battery that you can push power into and get power of out. In my area, they keep a running balance of the excess on my account month by month and square up with me if there's excess at the end of each annum at wholesale rate for electric. Other regions however meter power such that what you put into the grid is credited to you at wholesale (4c/kwh typical) and *always* bill you at retail for power coming into you meter. This is common in Australia and probably in many places in the USA. Heck, my power company even keeps track of on/off peak for the power I sell them... not sure why, they'll give me the wholesale rate at the end of the year anyway.

Without net metering the problem you'll have is that you need a way to store the power. How many kwh do you use to drive each day? You'll need a little more storage than that because unless you work nighshift, the solar system isnt making power when you are at home at night. SolarEdge makes an inverter called StorEdge that works with LG Chem 10kwh batteries. I've heard you can parallel two of them for 20kwh, not sure if you can parallel more. Never the less the StorEdge inverter is capped at 7.6kw. Given you probably get 5 hours a day, that's 38kwh potential... so a StorEdge with 4 LG Chem batteries would charge your car 1/2 way.
 
Even though my local utility charges about 10 cents per KWH, I am trying to see if I can install a small Solar Charging System with a storage setup so I can charge my car nightly to cover my 20to 30mile daily use. The storage could also provide backup in an emergency. Any ideas out there?
Not positive what the motivation here is... Cost savings? Your commute costs you around $1 - $1.3 in electricity per day. Makes little sense from cost-saving perspective IF system used only going to cover your charging needs. Having PV and PowerWall combo is more about self-powering your electrical needs IMO, while still using grid's elasticity as needed. And the obvious benefits of having a very capable Uninterruptable Power Supply (UPS) for the house.
 

BerTX

Active Member
Supporting Member
May 2, 2014
3,508
3,657
Texas/Washington
My understanding is that ESGs are alternative suppliers you can opt into buying from. The next sentence gets at this ("Thus, customers who choose an electricity supplier other than their utility or Default Service Provider (DSP) must check with the supplier to see if it offers net metering service.") I think what they're saying is that appointed utilities must offer net metering, but if you make special arrangements with a third party provider, then net metering availability is between you and that third party.
Thanks for the clarification. Obviously I didn't read it closely enough.
 

Products we're discussing on TMC...

About Us

Formed in 2006, Tesla Motors Club (TMC) was the first independent online Tesla community. Today it remains the largest and most dynamic community of Tesla enthusiasts. Learn more.

Do you value your experience at TMC? Consider becoming a Supporting Member of Tesla Motors Club. As a thank you for your contribution, you'll get nearly no ads in the Community and Groups sections. Additional perks are available depending on the level of contribution. Please visit the Account Upgrades page for more details.


SUPPORT TMC
Top