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Mobile connector very picky on 110V

Is anyone else's mobile connector extremely picky about whether it wants to work on 110?

I've had it work fine on an extension cord in some buildings while in others it wont charge on any of the plugs. On 220 I never have an issue.

I've been trying to use it in my new garage but when I plug in I get green light, then green flowing light and then a popup on the cluster that says "no power to plug". My car was at Firestone getting new tires an they had the same issue all over their shop.

I checked the wiring polarity using a GFCI receptacle tester someone else recommended and it comes up fine.

To be clear this is not a GFCI plug.

My next guess is to borrow a friends' mobile connector and see if his works.
 
If possible, try to do some troubleshooting. The best way I see for you to go forward is if you have a Tesla owning friend who can let you try their mobile connector, car, 120v adapter, etc... one at a time so you can try and narrow the problem down. A poor connection anywhere along the line (outlet, extension cord, 120v adapter, car inlet) could be the culprit. You could also have a mobile connector that is going bad in some way.

It would also be worthwhile to measure the voltage at the outlet before and during a charge.
 
If possible, try to do some troubleshooting. The best way I see for you to go forward is if you have a Tesla owning friend who can let you try their mobile connector, car, 120v adapter, etc... one at a time so you can try and narrow the problem down. A poor connection anywhere along the line (outlet, extension cord, 120v adapter, car inlet) could be the culprit. You could also have a mobile connector that is going bad in some way.

It would also be worthwhile to measure the voltage at the outlet before and during a charge.

Thanks, yeah i already set up trading mobile connectors with a friend next weekend. I'll post with updates.
 

Rocky_H

Well-Known Member
Feb 19, 2015
8,757
11,430
Boise, ID
There can be a couple of main issues involved with 120V outlets.

While people seem to be really careful to get the ground connections in and solid on 240V outlets, it seems more common with 120V outlets that people are less careful about getting that done correctly, or at all. I tried to plug in at my friend's house at an outdoor outlet along his driveway that they use for Christmas lights and such, and the UMC showed solid red for no ground. I don't know if whoever added those after the house was built even bothered to run a ground out to them.

And the other is GFCI. That can be done in various locations along the circuit, so even if you see that the outlet you are plugging into doesn't look like it's GFCI, it still might be, because they only need to put one of those kinds of outlets on their circuit somewhere, and it protects all outlets on the circuit. Or all of the outlets may be normal type, but it's a GFCI circuit breaker, which you wouldn't see. And since the Tesla UMC does a ground check using the exact method that GFCI is trying to prevent, it will very often trip if it has drifted out of spec a little, which those often tend to do over some years. And for any outlets in a garage or outdoors, they are all required by code to be GFCI circuits, so that's mainly what you would have access to.
 
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Rocky_H

Well-Known Member
Feb 19, 2015
8,757
11,430
Boise, ID
If I was tripping the GFCI i'd expect the whole plug to go dark after that but if I plug in again it gives me a green light and then tries to charge again.
Ah, another aspect I thought of is that 240V circuits are generally a straight 1-to-1 dedicated wiring run. But 120V circuits daisy chain through several outlets. That's a lot of connections and possible weak connection points that are marginal. A circuit tester may think it looks OK because it's not putting any load on it, but if you start trying to pull some heavy current through a barely touching loose connection, the voltage may drop terribly, and it says "nope".
 
Here’s a bit more detail on what’s happening
 

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aerodyne

MS LR = Last Car?
Nov 19, 2018
5,182
8,360
Los Angeles
I had problems with a STD 5-15 outlet in my garage with a Turo rented M3. The circuit was Daisy chained plus a ext cord. I set the amps low as possible, but still problems. Later took my old ICE, jumpered of the batt to a 1kv pure sine inveryer, and had no problems up to 8 amps.

Now I have direct wired a 5-20, 2 feet to breaker, and get 16 Amps, 116 v min, no problem. Teslafi reports average efficiency over 80 charges of 76%
 

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