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Model 3 Charging Options

Discussion in 'Model 3: Battery & Charging' started by aydyn, Jan 28, 2018.

  1. aydyn

    aydyn Member

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    I've read things that lead me to believe the Model 3 comes with a 220 charging cable? I already have a 220 50 amp outlet in my garage from when I owned a Volt. I'm trying to figure out if I need to shell out the $500 for the Tesla wall charger or not. Can someone clarify please ?
     
  2. coconutboy84

    coconutboy84 Member

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    yup the model 3 comes with the universal mobile connector and you can charge up to 40amps with it! so you are all good :)
     
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  3. Acps110

    Acps110 Member

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    The Standard Range Model 3 has a Max 32 Amp charger & the Long Range Model 3 has a Max 48 Amp charger. Both models come with a Mobile Connector capable of Max 32 Amp when plugged into a NEMA 14-50 outlet.

    If you get a Long Range Model 3 and want 40 or 48 Amp charging, then you can get a Wall Connector connected to a 50 or 60 Amp breaker.

    Home Charging Installation

    If you have a 240 volt / 50 Amp outlet already installed, it is either a NEMA 14-50 (4 wire) or a NEMA 6-50 (3 wire). The Moble Connector comes with the NEMA 14-50 pigtail & Tesla sells a NEMA 6-50 pigtail also.
     
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  4. sammyfan711

    sammyfan711 Member

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    I charged my 3 all night at 48amps, charged at 46 miles per hour!

    That's more MPH than my XP100DL which gets 45 mph at 72 amps!

    The efficiency of the model 3 would make the legacy cars look silly if they ever allow a 72 amp charger upgrade. This would rake in 69 miles per hour!
     
  5. gaswalla

    gaswalla Model S,3,X.. CT with Austin delivery

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    Op can use the supplied UMC with the 240 outlet currently installed (most likely 14-50 or 6-50). Or use the j1772 adapter with current setup. Or could spend 500, but wouldn't charge any faster.
     
  6. jsmay311

    jsmay311 Member

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    #6 jsmay311, Jan 28, 2018
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2018
    As noted above, the new UMC is limited to 32A, so a wall connector could allow faster charging of a Model 3 LR.

    Model S/X/3 Gen 2 Mobile Connector (mentions 32A max for UMC)

    Tesla Home Charging Info (shows the on-board charger amp ratings for each Tesla vehicle and the mph charge rates at various amperages)
     
  7. TexasEV

    TexasEV Well-Known Member

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    To the OP, it’s 240V, not 220V. Also it’s not a wall charger (the charger is in the car), it’s a Wall Connector. Basically the same as a J1772 EVSE but with a Tesla plug instead of a J1772 plug on the end. It’s entirely optional, most people just plug into a 50A outlet.

    Have you looked at the Tesla web site? You can read all about Tesla home charging here:
    Home Charging Installation
     
  8. novox77

    novox77 1.21 Gigawatts

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    This is the 240V 50A receptacle you need in your garage:
    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01M9FC5AR/

    The Model 3 Universal Mobile Connector (UMC) will plug directly into that. Max current during charging will be 32A @ ~240V = 7.68kW

    Also check out this page:
    Home Charging Installation

    Note the table with the charging rates: the UMC with the above current will charge 30 miles every hour.

    Wall Connector can get you to utilize the Model 3's max 48A rate, but to achieve this, you'll likely need to replace the current 50A breaker in your panel with a 60A, and you'll likely need to run a larger gauge cable in place of the existing one. Not worth it, IMO. Just use the UMC, or install the Wall Connector in place of the receptable (for purely aesthetic purposes) and live with the 32A charging. 30 miles an hour is really good.
     
  9. spacemnspiff

    spacemnspiff Member

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    I ordered a SR+ Model3, I am trying to understand what charging options should I go with for home. I am trying to choose between NEMA 14-50 receptacle vs the Wall Connector from the Tesla site. Since my car is Standard Range, according to Tesla's site the Wall Connector will need to be connected to 40A breaker, which means the max Amps that the SR can charge at is 32A.

    So does see the point of buying the Wall Connector for the SR and Mid Range models if both charge at 32A?
     
  10. MrMassTransit

    MrMassTransit Supporting Member

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    My electrician said the vast majority of his customers go with the 14-50. I went with the wall connector because I have an outdoor space in a condo parking lot. Although the mobile connector will lock when charging, I didn’t want the risk of someone trying to detach it or steal it while it was connected and charging. But there’s no real functional benefit to the wall connector unless you have an LR. Even then, most people don’t need the faster charging rate.
     
  11. SoundDaTrumpet

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    The Wall Connector can take any breaker from 15A thru 100A. Tesla just installed my Wall Connector. My licensed Tesla electrician and electrician-in-training set me up with 100A. Great value IMO.

    The Wall Connect allows you to safely (via official hardware means) to turn down (adjust) charge rate to fit within your home's allowable NEC load calculation to be compliant (and deemed safe).
     
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  12. TexasEV

    TexasEV Well-Known Member

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    There’s really not much point if your car is limited to 32A charging. Some people like the looks of the permanent installation better. I’ve had a UMC plugged in and hanging on the wall since 2013 and I’m fine with that. I just unplug it and take it with me for out of town trips, otherwise it stays plugged in.
     
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  13. spacemnspiff

    spacemnspiff Member

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    Thanks a lot for the responses. Another thought was that my next EV purchase will probably be in 4-5 years from now, so I won't have a second car to charge, which was another consideration for the Wall Connector. So Wall Connector might not make sense apart from the aesthetics.

    Can the NEMA 14-50 receptacle be changed to a Wall Connector later?
     
  14. SR22pilot

    SR22pilot Member

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    Short answer is yes. Look online and you will see a wall charger that plugs into a 14-50. However, it doesn't charge as fast as a wall connect on a LR batter. I don't know about on the SR. I find the wall connector convenient and like having the mobile connector always stored in the car. However, I fully understand the argument for just using a 14-50. Either are plenty fast for home charging.
     
  15. srs5694

    srs5694 Active Member

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    As I understand it, the sub-LR Model 3s are limited to 32A with any L2 EVSE. (Some L2 EVSEs provide less than that, in which case the Model 3 adjusts its charge rate down to match.) You can wire Tesla's Wall Connector to a circuit that permits faster charge rates, but your car simply won't take advantage of the extra speed. It'll be there in the EVSE, though, so it might become useful if you trade in your Model 3 for another one or if a friend or relative visits with a Tesla that can charge at a higher rate. Personally, I wouldn't pay a lot for more capacity, but if it's just a few bucks, you might as well do it. (The big cost driver will be in the wiring from the EVSE to your house's breaker box, which has to be thicker, and therefore more expensive, for a higher-amperage line.) Even a Model X with the biggest battery will charge fast enough on 32A for most peoples' needs.

    More broadly, a Wall Connector has a number of advantages over Tesla's Mobile Connector:
    • Higher amperage -- As above, this won't be a big deal for you now, but might be a modest benefit in the future or on occasion if you have visitors who drive Teslas.
    • Better weather resistance -- If your installation is outdoors, I'd go for the Wall Connector because it's likely to be safer when used in rain or snow. This isn't to say that a Mobile Connector is a death trap or anything; but there will be at least two extra plugs involved (at the NEMA 14-50, or whatever wall outlet you use, and on the EVSE itself). Tesla doesn't make it explicit, but I'm guessing their Wall Connector has at least a NEMA 3R weather-resistance rating. I have no idea if the Mobile Connector has such a rating at all. Of course, if you'll be keeping this equipment in your garage, this point is, well, pointless.
    • Better theft resistance -- The Mobile Connector is easily unplugged and stolen, if it's in a public space. You could build or add a locked box in which to keep it, but that adds cost and complexity. Again, this factor is mostly important for outdoor installations, not if you'll be using a garage.
    • Better cable management -- The Wall Connector includes a built-in holster, and it's available in two cable lengths -- 8.5-foot and 24-foot. The Mobile Connector has no holster and is available only with a 20-foot cable. Thus, the Wall Connector may make it easier to manage the cable and/or to have it reach your car's charge port. Details vary with your specific circumstances, though. If your breaker box is in your garage right next to where your car's charge port will be, for instance, you can buy the version with the 8.5-foot cable to simplify cable management and install it next to the breaker box to minimize installation costs; but if the outlet or EVSE would have to be far from the car's charge port, the version with the 24-foot cable might be preferable.
    • Convenience/Backup -- If you buy a Wall Connector, or even a second Mobile Connector, then you can keep the one that came with your car in your car at all times, with minimal fuss. If all you've got is the one Mobile Connector, then you'll either be driving around without an EVSE in the car or you'll need to move it between storage in the car and use plugged-in state whenever you want to drive vs. charge. Having the EVSE with you isn't necessary, but the EVSE can be a backup/emergency charge solution -- say, if you forget to charge or if you have a problem charging for some reason (an extended power outage, maybe).
    • Redundancy -- If you have two EVSEs, then a failure of one means you'll still be able to charge.
    Overall, if you have a garage, then the reasons for getting a Wall Connector are slim, but not non-existent. If you charge outdoors, though, I would recommend getting a Wall Connector (or conceivably a third-party J1772 EVSE, if you expect to be charging non-Tesla EVs any time soon).

    Of course. If nothing else, the old wiring could be pulled and new wiring put in for whatever EVSE you want. I don't see why the existing wiring couldn't be re-used, although the fact that it's already cut to length means you'll be limited in options for where to mount a future EVSE. You might want to discuss this with your electrician, to have the install done in a way to maximize your options. One more point: Many wall-mounted EVSEs are available with NEMA 14-50 plugs, so you may be able to use one that's so configured, rather than hard-wired. I vaguely recall seeing something to the effect that Tesla once sold a Wall Connector variant with a plug, but it's not currently on their Web site. I have no idea what the odds are of Tesla adding that configuration back. Adding a plug to one that comes with a hard-wiring "pigtail" should also be possible. Again, that's something you might want to discuss with an electrician.
     
  16. hugh_jassol

    hugh_jassol Member

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    I have a LEMR (Limited Edition Mid Range) which is also capped at 32A charging. I installed a Tesla Wall Connector because my power company (LADWP) provides a $500 rebate on installed EVSEs. And I wanted to leave the mobile one that came with the car in the car.

    Although in 3 months of ownership, I've never used the mobile one.
     
  17. spacemnspiff

    spacemnspiff Member

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    Thanks so much for the reply. The charging will all happen in the garage, so weather protection is not as important, but the local county requires a GFCI breaker for EVSE installations.

    Thanks @hugh_jassol
    I just found out that MD state offers $700 towards EVSE installation. If any other Marylanders need to file a rebate, here is the link.
    The rebate is tempting me towards getting the Wall Connector.

    Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Rebate Program 2.0
     
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