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Model 3 Crash Safety

Discussion in 'Model 3' started by ⚡️ELECTROMAN⚡️, Jan 13, 2018.

  1. ⚡️ELECTROMAN⚡️

    ⚡️ELECTROMAN⚡️ Active Member

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    The main reason that I bought a Model S was for it's safety record. Now that the Model 3 is here and it's looking to be an amazing car, it's got me thinking about exercising my first day reservation and then selling my S. Is there any chance that the probability of injury in an accident could be better or maybe nearly as good as the S? Or is there just no way, given the size difference? If a 3 and an S were involved in a head-on collision, I wonder if the passengers in the 3 would be much worse off. I'm not willing to give up much when it comes to safety.
     
  2. kbecks13

    kbecks13 Active Member

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    They are likely very comparable in terms of safety, especially from a head-on collision stand point since both have massive crumple zones relative to traditional ICE vehicles.
     
  3. dm33

    dm33 Member

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    I worry that the Model 3 is much LESS safe for rear passengers in particular, often kids, because the rear door will not open if an accident cuts power.

    This could be devastating in a serious crash where exiting the vehicle in a timely manner is essential in case of battery ignition.

    It seems to me that Tesla will change this sooner or later and add a manual release for the rear doors. I can't imagine that this is acceptable. I'm hoping my order shows up after the change.
     
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  4. FURY

    FURY Member

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    Hopefully it will not be as cumbersome as the Model X

    Thank you very much

    FURY
     
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  5. NIGHTHAWK017

    NIGHTHAWK017 Member

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    I get people’s concern about there not being any manual releases int he back seats, but in reality, is there any concern with child safety locks on any other car?

    It defeats the purpose of back door opening mechanisms. And if you had both, which would have priority? The “open no matter what” in case of emergency or the “don’t open” to prevent kids from opening the door?
     
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  6. anticitizen13.7

    anticitizen13.7 Not posting at TMC after 9/17/2018

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    Mass matters. Model S is about 1000 lbs heavier than a Model 3.

    It is IMO probable that in a front collision between an S and a 3 that the S occupants would suffer less injuries.
     
  7. EV-lutioin

    EV-lutioin Active Member

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    Remember that head-on crash tests are done such that the vehicle is rated upon its ability to sustain a head on crash with a vehicle of similar weight (Essentially, against itself). So a small car and a large car can both have 5 star ratings, but the larger car will be safer by virtue of its mass. In a head-on collision between a Model 3 and a Model S, the Model S will win.
     
  8. C141medic

    C141medic Active Member

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    Anyone have any factual info on M3 crash test ratings? Or have they not been released yet?
     
  9. EV-lutioin

    EV-lutioin Active Member

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    I think the data is still internal, but Tesla has announced 5-Star in all categories, so presumably they have in-house tests to support that claim. As I understand it, NHTSA tests don't occur until about 6-9 months after a car is released to the public. As least that is how it worked with the Model X.
     
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  10. ggnykk

    ggnykk Active Member

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    Depends if you are talking about multi-car crash (your Tesla crash with another car), or if it is a single-car crash (only your Tesla crash to a pole, tree or a barrier). Model S and X is better off in multi-car crash because it is heavier. But Model 3 is better in single-car crash because it is designed with the latest crash tests/standard in mind, especially the 25% small overlap frontal crash test.
     
  11. Az_Rael

    Az_Rael Supporting Member

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    I was within less than a second of experiencing one of these in my 2013 S. Was very glad I didn’t get to test the S’s capability in that very scary scenario. I am hopeful that the 3 is designed to all the latest standards. I have noticed the headlights are much better (probably in response to that “poor” they got from the IIHS).
     
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  12. SmartElectric

    SmartElectric Active Member

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    Wise words : Judge me by my size you should not.

     
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  13. T-Will

    T-Will Member

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    What is the suggested procedure for getting rear passengers out of the M3 in case the power is cut and there is imminent danger? Climb out the front door? Smash the massive rear window? :confused:
     
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  14. WarpedOne

    WarpedOne Supreme Premier

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    You get the rear passengers out by openning the rear doors from the outside.
     
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  15. T-Will

    T-Will Member

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    How does this work if power has been cut (since all doors use electronic latching mechanisms)?
     
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  16. Jason S

    Jason S Model S Sig Perf (P85)

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    The mechanism is a lever. It'll still be a lever when the power is out. Presumeably the only thing keeping the doors locked is power too, whether inside or outside release.
     
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  17. AlanSqB

    AlanSqB Dog Chauffeur

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    When I heard about the doors, I bought a 2-pack of emergency hammers with seatbelt cutters. I’m going to mount one in the back somewhere not too conspicuous but handy to both sides. The other will go in the center console.
     
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  18. fmcotton

    fmcotton Member

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    I always wondered the same when I get into someone’s car that has the child safe locks turned on.
     
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  19. vigge50

    vigge50 Member

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    I know that Elon said that one the presentation in 2016 but later they write that they had the goal to get 5 star rating, have they confirmed that they will get 5 star in every category?
     
  20. T-Will

    T-Will Member

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    The handle doesn’t mechanically unlatch the door, when pushing the large part of the handle, the door becomes electronically unlatched (similar to S and X).

    I guess the likeliness of an event occurring where the rear passengers need to quickly escape is pretty low, and adults and children could just crawl to the front seats, or parent could reach back to help smaller children.
     
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