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Model 3 LR usable battery capacity?

Discussion in 'Model 3: Battery & Charging' started by ratsbew, Jul 21, 2018.

  1. ratsbew

    ratsbew Member

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    I've been struggling to find a consensus on the usable capacity of the Model 3's battery pack. I'm trying to do trip planning and need to know the capacity for my trip calculations as far as what my max Wh/mile can be.

    I've been using 70kWh as a conservative estimate. Has anyone extracted more than this on a single charge?
     
  2. omgwtfbyobbq

    omgwtfbyobbq Active Member

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    Yup. The way most people drive would result in roughly 75kWh of energy for a newer car/battery. You can get up to a few more kWh of energy out if you drive more efficiently/have a lower average discharge rate, but that isn't something i would depend on.
     
    • Like x 1
  3. ratsbew

    ratsbew Member

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    Driving style shouldn't really impact usable capacity, should it?
     
  4. omgwtfbyobbq

    omgwtfbyobbq Active Member

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    #4 omgwtfbyobbq, Jul 21, 2018
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2018
    It can, but it doesn't impact capacity for all practical purposes. For instance, going from how the average person drives to driving a steady 55mph with no HVAC is needed just to get from about 75kWh to 78kWh. Someone in Motorsports might only be able to get 70+kWh out because of the high average discharge rates. But yeah, most people won't see any difference unless their driving environment and behavior varies a lot.
     
  5. ratsbew

    ratsbew Member

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    Speaking of HVAC. Do the trip counters take HVAC demand into consideration for the Wh/mile calculations?
     
  6. omgwtfbyobbq

    omgwtfbyobbq Active Member

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    I'm not sure. It should be easy to test though. Just reset one of the trip counters and do a mile drive someplace where you can go the same speed/don't have to brake with the car warm followed by another reset and mile drive after leaving the AC on for ten minutes or so.
     
  7. brianman

    brianman Burrito Founder

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    My gut reaction as a Tesla driver for nearly 6 years is that you're cutting it to close with your trip. Can you give some more details? It sounds like you might be travelling in one or more areas where superchargers are sparse or missing entirely.
     
  8. ratsbew

    ratsbew Member

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    I'm planning a 270 mile interstate leg. I'm doing my math based on 280 miles which means I need to average 250Wh/mile to use 70KWh.

    My goal speed is 70mph sustained (the speed limit varies between 70 and 75 with respect to state lines). From my initial testing I think 70mph will keep it under 250Wh/mile unless there are substantial headwinds.

    I'll be traveling I-40 from Russellville, AR to Oklahoma City. There are no superchargers along this section.
     
    • Helpful x 1
  9. ratsbew

    ratsbew Member

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    It seems like it shouldn't be too much to ask 270 miles out of a car that's "rated" for 334. I'll be departing a destination charger with 100%.
     
  10. Dr. J

    Dr. J Member

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    abetterrouteplanner.com says you'll be cuttin' it close (on my computer): 63 MPH max speed, start with 100% battery and arrive with 12%. That's with 18" wheels and aero covers. If you have 19" wheels, I wouldn't try it. You may be missing salient details of your route like elevation changes or prevailing winds.

    At 69 MPH, it shows you arrive with 4% battery. I guess you could make it at 70 MPH, but I'd drive slower at the beginning to make sure.

    "Rated" for 334 miles is a calculation of 70% of the EPA test, which is not at all like driving at highway speeds over varied terrain.
     
  11. ratsbew

    ratsbew Member

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    This brings me back to my original question of how many KWh I can extract from the battery so that I know what Wh/mile to stay under.

    I know the car can do 600+ miles at slow speeds, so it's just a matter of finding a good speed that balances travel duration with SOC at the destination.
     
  12. TT97

    TT97 Active Member

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    Let the GPS do the math for you. Reset the trip computer and put in your destination on the GPS. It will tell you how much battery you will have left once you arrive.

    Keep an eye on the remaining battery % and compare to your trip consumption. If the end % is dropping, than you need to lower your consumption.

    For what's it worth, EPA determined usable battery was 80 kWh and Tesla responded saying 78 kWh.
     
    • Like x 1
  13. ratsbew

    ratsbew Member

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    I can't wait for the Model 3 to get the trip planner graph from the S and X. That graph is so useful!

    I really think I'll be fine. If not, there is a destination charger about 30 miles from my destination that I can stop at for an hour if the headwinds are too much.
     
  14. Zoomit

    Zoomit Member

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    That’s not really how it worked. In the document Tesla provided to the EPA, it indicated ~80 kWh total and ~78 kWh usable. Many have been seeing between 72-75 kWh usable however.
     
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  15. brianman

    brianman Burrito Founder

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    If I was in your shoes, I'd make the slight detour to the Catoosa supercharger -- 193 miles from Russellville -- as my first leg. Unless the weather was perfect, I was alone, and I felt like an adventure (which might end with driving 30mph for 20+ miles ;)).

    In case you weren't aware, I've found this site very useful (and it's what pointed me to Catoosa):
    EV Trip Planner
     
  16. brianman

    brianman Burrito Founder

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    334?
     
  17. dhrivnak

    dhrivnak Active Member

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    If you have the aero wheels you should be good. I have been very close to rated miles on the interstate at 70 mph. Headwinds, hard rain and elevation can also work in your favor or against you.

    On a level road and 50 mph I was able to go 375 miles. My watts/mile were just under 220 on that trip.
     
  18. ratsbew

    ratsbew Member

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    I'd rather not go through catoosa. I could drop my speed down to 60 mph and it would still be faster than the big detour to the north....I think it would be more fun to push the limits too.

    Anyhow, this thread is off topic. I guess I'll learn more about the available KWh as I gain experience with the car.
     
  19. jamnmon66

    jamnmon66 Member

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    The navigation in the car does take elevation into account, but not HVAC or driving style. I've done several day trips through the mountains in Colorado and I usually arrive 5%ish less battery than it said when I started. But I crank the AC and usually cruise 10-15 over the speed limit.
     
  20. jamnmon66

    jamnmon66 Member

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    Forgot to mention that the variance is similar whether I'm going uphill or downhill.
     

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