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Model 3 Performance Real World Range

SaloonGoon

2020 PD3+ 2021 PDY 2019 AUDI R8P
Nov 12, 2019
92
131
Bay Area
I have a 100 mile, round trip, commute, and I keep the car at 72-75 mph mostly. The freeway on-ramp near my home is literally one mile away, and where I work is literally one mile from the off-ramp I use.

I charge to 80% every morning (I work graves), and I generally plug-in at 22-25% SOC. I’m not sure if the range I’m seeing is typical for my driving style and/or daily mileage.

The car is a 2020 PD3+, and I took delivery in December. Odometer is currently at 14,219

I’m very interested to see how performance and battery life degrade over time. Many people I know judge me for buying a $65K commuter car, but the tranquil nature of my drive in every night is priceless-so is the 0-60.
 
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vsansal

Member
Oct 11, 2019
77
41
Arlington,VA
I own a performance with 19ich wheels. I don't have access to charging at home. I don't use sentry mode when parked at home but I do use it everywhere else. When I drive short trips with highway/freeway and city driving mixed, I do get about 100 miles per 40% charge. I usually dont wait for it to drop below 20% to charge it unless I am driving long distance. If I am driving long distance cruising highway speeds around 75 to 80mph and ac or heat running it consumes about 35% per 100 miles. So for long distance I would say from 90% to 10% or so, I get around 220 to 230 miles but in city driving with multiple stops it is around 180 to 200 miles. If I was to drive long distance from 100% down to 0% I can get around 260ish miles but of course I don't do that. So for city driving or commuting I would consider my performance 180 miles of real world range and for long distance 230 miles of real world range. I have around 7k miles and my lifetime consumption is 252Wh/mi.
 

jbcarioca

Well-Known Member
Feb 3, 2015
5,244
25,455
My lifetime Wh/mi is 304. For reference my lifetime Wh/mi for my P85D was 306. My driving style on both was AFAIK identical. Both have included long road trips Miami, FL to Halifax, NS and Miami-Chicago.

Displayed 100% range on the P3D+ is ~285/290. The longest trips I make without stopping are ~240 miles, but mostly I stop for bio/charging at ~3 hours regardless of SOC. I'm rarely less that 20% SOC after ~225 miles. I try never to go below 20%.

If I had more capacity I suspect I'd stop anyway every three hours or so. That seems to be the optimal one to remain alert, giving time of a bit of exercise while charging.
 
Sep 29, 2020
19
11
Birmingham, AL
I know this is an older thread but I found it while researching how my own real world mileage compares to that of others and figured I'd add my numbers thus far.

We took a weekend trip this past Sunday (model 3 performance w/20" wheels) for a total of 200 miles for the round trip. I charged to 100% before leaving and arrived back home with 14% remaining. The computer said it was good for 41 miles but I think realistically, it's probably 25~30 miles.

According to TeslaFi, the trip was nearly 100% interstate driving with the first leg average speed of 71 mph and average Wh/Mi of 263 - 87.4% efficiency.

Battery went from 99% to 62%

95.38 Miles Driven - 109.16 Rated Miles Used

There was about 5 miles driven around town mainly just to show off the car (i.e. blow through the battery) @ 502 Wh/Mile

Battery went from 62% to 57%


The return trip avg speed was 70mph @ 300 Wh/Mi - 76.7% Efficiency

Battery went from 57% to 14%

95.72 Miles Driven - 124.88 Rated Miles Used

I'm mainly looking at this data and coming to the realization that I may not be able to take the car on another trip in a couple weeks. The round trip is 242 miles and if I average between 285~300 Wh/mi, that would be cutting it EXTREMELY close and there is currently only trickle charging where we'd be going.

I have a few options that may work and I guess having to do these types of mental gymnastics and number crunching is just a part of owning these cars.

Option 1 - (most reasonable) - Go 15 min further north past my main exit to the supercharger and spend 15~20 minutes there and then backtrack to our destination (adds about 45 minutes total time to the trip but ensures plenty of charge for the rest of the trip). My main fear here is us having a time we're supposed to be at our destination and not being able to get the kids out of the house early enough to have the extra time to go to the supercharger.

Option 2 - (Doable but may drive me crazy) - Get behind a semi and drive 65~70 and hope the drafting extends the range enough to make a meaningful impact on the wh/mi rating. I've seen other Tesla's doing this on other trips I've taken and now I totally get it.

Option 3 - (My last resort) - Take the travel charger and trickle charge for about 4~5 hours (probably will not make any real difference)

The real issue here though is that there is a glaring omission of fast charging locations in the south east. The superchargers are only convenient if you're passing THROUGH the state and Tesla's trip planner and ABRP are absolutely useless for round trip planning where there are no charging options at your destination other than the 10 mile/hr charge point stations.

Even if there is a 30~40 mile per hour option level 2 charger or 14-50 outlet, at the end of a long day when you're looking at a 2 hour drive home, the last thing my wife and kids will want to do is sit in a parking lot for an hour just to make sure we can get home without dying on the side of the road.
 

theothertom

Member
May 9, 2020
300
182
South Carolina
I have a 100 mile, round trip, commute, and I keep the car at 72-75 mph mostly. The freeway on-ramp near my home is literally one mile away, and where I work is literally one mile from the off-ramp I use.

I charge to 80% every morning (I work graves), and I generally plug-in at 22-25% SOC. I’m not sure if the range I’m seeing is typical for my driving style and/or daily mileage.

The car is a 2020 PD3+, and I took delivery in December. Odometer is currently at 14,219

I’m very interested to see how performance and battery life degrade over time. Many people I know judge me for buying a $65K commuter car, but the tranquil nature of my drive in every night is priceless-so is the 0-60.
If I did the math right, you're using 42,375 wHr to drive 100 miles. That works out to be 423 wHr/mi. Does that sound right?
 

Zcd1

Member
Sep 2, 2018
715
812
Walloon Lake, MI / LaQuinta, CA
...I have a few options that may work and I guess having to do these types of mental gymnastics and number crunching is just a part of owning these cars.

Option 1 - (most reasonable) - Go 15 min further north past my main exit to the supercharger and spend 15~20 minutes there and then backtrack to our destination (adds about 45 minutes total time to the trip but ensures plenty of charge for the rest of the trip)....

Option 1 appears to be the best/most viable option. I wouldn’t try to do 240 miles with no charging.

Have you checked PlugShare for potential charging options closer to your destination?

What about dropping the wife and kids off then doing the Supercharging by yourself?

Leave 20 minutes earlier and the net net is only about 30-40 minutes less time at your destination.
 
Sep 29, 2020
19
11
Birmingham, AL
The problem with dropping them off is that the destination is 45 minutes east of the interstate/Athens so I'd have to drive 45 minutes, drop them off, drive back to the interstate 45 minutes, charge and then drive 45 minutes back to the destination.

The Athens superchargers are only about 15 minutes north of our normal exit.

As far as I can tell, there are no destination chargers near our destination. There are some 14-50 plus downtown huntsville but the time spent going to those and the slower charge speed would be a waste of time.

The only real alternative would be if there were a 14-50 plug at our destination. There very well could be. I'm checking with some family to see if they have one I can use. It's a farm with several shops where tractors are repaired (welding) so I'm hoping that's an option and I can just take my travel charger.
 

Zcd1

Member
Sep 2, 2018
715
812
Walloon Lake, MI / LaQuinta, CA
The problem with dropping them off is that the destination is 45 minutes east of the interstate/Athens so I'd have to drive 45 minutes, drop them off, drive back to the interstate 45 minutes, charge and then drive 45 minutes back to the destination...

Yeah, that doesn't sound like a viable option...

...The only real alternative would be if there were a 14-50 plug at our destination. There very well could be. I'm checking with some family to see if they have one I can use. It's a farm with several shops where tractors are repaired (welding) so I'm hoping that's an option and I can just take my travel charger.

If they have 220V but not specifically a 14-50 socket you could also get a different adapter for whatever socket is available...

Good luck with the trip!
 

toddkageals

Member
Dec 8, 2020
126
77
Vinton
I know this is an older thread but I found it while researching how my own real world mileage compares to that of others and figured I'd add my numbers thus far.

We took a weekend trip this past Sunday (model 3 performance w/20" wheels) for a total of 200 miles for the round trip. I charged to 100% before leaving and arrived back home with 14% remaining. The computer said it was good for 41 miles but I think realistically, it's probably 25~30 miles.

According to TeslaFi, the trip was nearly 100% interstate driving with the first leg average speed of 71 mph and average Wh/Mi of 263 - 87.4% efficiency.

Battery went from 99% to 62%

95.38 Miles Driven - 109.16 Rated Miles Used

There was about 5 miles driven around town mainly just to show off the car (i.e. blow through the battery) @ 502 Wh/Mile

Battery went from 62% to 57%


The return trip avg speed was 70mph @ 300 Wh/Mi - 76.7% Efficiency

Battery went from 57% to 14%

95.72 Miles Driven - 124.88 Rated Miles Used

I'm mainly looking at this data and coming to the realization that I may not be able to take the car on another trip in a couple weeks. The round trip is 242 miles and if I average between 285~300 Wh/mi, that would be cutting it EXTREMELY close and there is currently only trickle charging where we'd be going.

I have a few options that may work and I guess having to do these types of mental gymnastics and number crunching is just a part of owning these cars.

Option 1 - (most reasonable) - Go 15 min further north past my main exit to the supercharger and spend 15~20 minutes there and then backtrack to our destination (adds about 45 minutes total time to the trip but ensures plenty of charge for the rest of the trip). My main fear here is us having a time we're supposed to be at our destination and not being able to get the kids out of the house early enough to have the extra time to go to the supercharger.

Option 2 - (Doable but may drive me crazy) - Get behind a semi and drive 65~70 and hope the drafting extends the range enough to make a meaningful impact on the wh/mi rating. I've seen other Tesla's doing this on other trips I've taken and now I totally get it.

Option 3 - (My last resort) - Take the travel charger and trickle charge for about 4~5 hours (probably will not make any real difference)

The real issue here though is that there is a glaring omission of fast charging locations in the south east. The superchargers are only convenient if you're passing THROUGH the state and Tesla's trip planner and ABRP are absolutely useless for round trip planning where there are no charging options at your destination other than the 10 mile/hr charge point stations.

Even if there is a 30~40 mile per hour option level 2 charger or 14-50 outlet, at the end of a long day when you're looking at a 2 hour drive home, the last thing my wife and kids will want to do is sit in a parking lot for an hour just to make sure we can get home without dying on the side of the road.

I realize that this is old, but I wanted to give you an "amen". I'm picking up my car on Thursday of this week. The first trip I want to take is three hours away to my kid's sporting event (Charlotte, NC). We'd be there a few hours, then need to turn around and go home (Roanoke, VA). This is about 225 miles both ways, so the car has to be charged at some point. There's ONE SC location that's on an alternate route that I am going to try, but wow......talk about range anxiety....and I don't even have my car yet!
 

Rocky_H

Well-Known Member
Feb 19, 2015
6,247
7,289
Boise, ID
I realize that this is old, but I wanted to give you an "amen". I'm picking up my car on Thursday of this week. The first trip I want to take is three hours away to my kid's sporting event (Charlotte, NC). We'd be there a few hours, then need to turn around and go home (Roanoke, VA). This is about 225 miles both ways, so the car has to be charged at some point.
I like trying to figure out challenging routes and help people solve problems, but...
There's ONE SC location that's on an alternate route that I am going to try, but wow......talk about range anxiety....and I don't even have my car yet!
...this is some really wild over-the-top exaggeration.

If I let Google Maps just plot shortest route between Roanoake, VA and Charlotte, NC, it says via I-81 and I-77 for a total distance of 198 miles. You're making it sound like there is nothing along your route, and only "ONE" (in all caps) alternative that is way out of your way. I'm not sure which you would consider your "main" route and which you are thinking of as "alternate", but there are two very clear routes that are about the same distance, and both have easy Supercharger coverage.

Option 1:
The one Google picked has the Mt. Airy Supercharger along the way. That's a little detour off the highway to use it--211 miles.

Option 2: If you go south to Greensboro first, there are choices of a couple of Superchargers, either in Greensboro or in Lexington. If I just pick the one in Lexington, along the way, the total route is only 190 miles--an even shorter distance than Google picked.

And the distances of these segments in between charges aren't even more than about 130 miles at the most, so there really isn't any range anxiety about this. I get that anything that is different or unknown always has some nervousness about trying something new, but this isn't a range difficulty at all.
 

robl45

Member
Dec 23, 2019
490
142
33076
Rocky is right, but still when I had to do my long trip, we definitely had to get a bit creative to get through versus gas. Also when we weren't sure if the hurricane was going to be going up the coast I tried to make alternate plans and guess what? There really was not alternate that didn't take at least an extra hour or 2. Range anxiety is real but certainly getting better. It would be a lot less real if Tesla quoted its vehicles accurately IMHO. My supposed 299 mile M3P is lucky if I get 200-210 out of it on a long trip.
 
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jjrandorin

Moderator, Model 3, Tesla Energy Forums
Nov 28, 2018
8,741
9,715
Riverside Co. CA
the EPA isn't forcing Tesla to rely on their numbers. Tesla could certainly say EPA estimate and Tesla estimate or whatever. The reality for a long drive a 300mile car is 200 miles tops. Telling people the truth will help adoption.

I marked this disagree because its laughable to expect any manufacturer to say, in effect, "i know the EPA tests say XX but if you drive 80 miles per hour you will get Y, if you drive 70 MPH you will get Z". level that at the EPA, no one should be expecting anyone to report something different than the official tests say, tesla or otherwise.

The TESTS need to change. expecting something else is silly.
 

theothertom

Member
May 9, 2020
300
182
South Carolina
You might want to try abetterrouteplanner.com (also an app for your phone) to plot your route. IMO the interface is a little clunky but once you figure it out it works pretty well. Also get the Plugshare app to help locate chargers.
 

robl45

Member
Dec 23, 2019
490
142
33076
I marked this disagree because its laughable to expect any manufacturer to say, in effect, "i know the EPA tests say XX but if you drive 80 miles per hour you will get Y, if you drive 70 MPH you will get Z". level that at the EPA, no one should be expecting anyone to report something different than the official tests say, tesla or otherwise.

The TESTS need to change. expecting something else is silly.

I think any rational person knows that the EPA tests for gas cars are laughable so why would they expect them better for an electric car? Tesla had no problem originally posting its prices with expected savings built in which was blatantly lying in the worst case, so expecting them to do something different than other automakers shouldn't be out of the realm of reality.
 

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