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Model 3 Tires, Tire Sizes, Types, make / model recommendations, tire discussions, etc

I'm looking to get new tires and would like to get Goodyear Assurance WeatherReady 18" tires, but they are not rated XL.

1) Is anyone using Goodyear Assurance WeatherReady or MaxLife 18" tires and are they working?

2) How much of a concern is it that they are not rated XL? (Load index 670kg instead of 710kg per tire.)

3) Would I be putting myself in a vulnerable legal position if something goes wrong with the tires since XL tires are recommended?
 
I came across a great deal for Kumho Ecsta 4X II KU22 tires where it's buy 3, get 1 free plus free install. I don't want to be cheap on tires but it seems like it has decent reviews. Has anyone had experience with this one? 235/45/18 size.

On the other hand Michelin offered me 40% off to purchase the Pilot Pro Sport 4S Acoustic Tech tires which I am leaning towards.

Let me know your thoughts
 
Is anyone running this size tire 255/35/20 over the stock 235/35/20. I am looking at putting on Michelin pilot sport 4s.I am sure the tires will save the rims from curb rash but will take a hit on mileage / efficiency. Are 255's too wide and is clearance a known issue?

And does anyone have experience running run-flat tires?
 
Hey, I put the N0 porsche version of the 235s on my 20 inch sport wheels as the rim protection looked a little more pronounced when compared to my aero wheels. A little noisier than the aeros but nothing too significant.

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I feel like a broken record but here goes - please don't put inappropriately sized tires on your Model 3. We've had several documented cases of issues with the Traction Control/ABS/Stability systems due to undersized or oversized tires. The "safe" range is 26" to 26.8" (1.1% max difference from stock options).

If you feel like you need wider tires, step up to 265/30/20's. Of course, then you need wider wheels (9"+) which defeats the whole purpose of your goal regardless. The better option for stock 20" wheels is 245/35/20's.

The trick to curb protection is not hitting the curbs ;)

P.S. If you would like to put rolling cement blocks onto your car and ruin your efficiency, buy "run-flats" (which is a misnomer in itself, and far more aggravation then it is worth IMHO).
 
They are 8.5J all round and 35mm offset. N0 just means they are fully approved for Porsche vehicles, just like T0 is for Tesla. Does the rim protection look more pronounced than what you have just now?
the 2021 M3P Uberturbine rime are 9". They are the same size as the "Zero G" track package rime/tires except they have 245's which I am also considering.
 
I feel like a broken record but here goes - please don't put inappropriately sized tires on your Model 3. We've had several documented cases of issues with the Traction Control/ABS/Stability systems due to undersized or oversized tires. The "safe" range is 26" to 26.8" (1.1% max difference from stock options).

If you feel like you need wider tires, step up to 265/30/20's. Of course, then you need wider wheels (9"+) which defeats the whole purpose of your goal regardless. The better option for stock 20" wheels is 245/35/20's.

The trick to curb protection is not hitting the curbs ;)

P.S. If you would like to put rolling cement blocks onto your car and ruin your efficiency, buy "run-flats" (which is a misnomer in itself, and far more aggravation then it is worth IMHO).
Thank you for the help. This is my first Tesla. So I am a little confused with the mention of 265's. My vehicle is the M3P and I have not had delivery yet (Mar 1). The new 2021 Uberturbine 20" rims are 9" rims. So you are saying that 265/30/20's are a safer option with regard to Traction Control/ABS/Stability systems over 255/35/20's? I am also heavily considering the 245/35/20's.
 
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Thank you for the help. This is my first Tesla. So I am a little confused with the mention of 265's. My vehicle is the M3P and I have not had delivery yet (Mar 1). The new 2021 Uberturbine 20" rims are 9" rims. So you are saying that 265/30/20's are a safer option with regard to Traction Control/ABS/Stability systems over 255/35/20's? I am also heavily considering the 245/35/20's.

Ah, yes, sorry I didn't realize it was a 2021. In that case, yes you already have 9" wheels. Therefore, 245/35/20 or 265/30/20 will keep the traction control happy. There is probably going to be some range loss putting 265's on over 245's, so I would probably say the 245 Michelin PS4S is your best option. You may also consider an aftermarket 19" wheel setup, which is my preference to protect against bends. Titan-7 makes really nice forged wheels, and T-Sportline is reasonably priced for relatively light flow-formed wheels.
 

TwoK4drSi

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Apr 3, 2019
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Ah, yes, sorry I didn't realize it was a 2021. In that case, yes you already have 9" wheels. Therefore, 245/35/20 or 265/30/20 will keep the traction control happy. There is probably going to be some range loss putting 265's on over 245's, so I would probably say the 245 Michelin PS4S is your best option. You may also consider an aftermarket 19" wheel setup, which is my preference to protect against bends. Titan-7 makes really nice forged wheels, and T-Sportline is reasonably priced for relatively light flow-formed wheels.
Also to note...please make sure you are looking at the tire specs from the manufacturer ESPECIALLY section width. If your main point is to try to go wider to protect the wheel...certain manufacturers / tire models will have a rim protector persay. I know continental contiprotx and one Dunlop model has it.

Now while you are looking at section width also look at tread width. If the tread width is LOWER than the wheel width...you will get a stretched look. Wheel width is measured inside lip to inside lip of the wheel. So in order to get a flat looking sidewall...add about 1” ie 9” wheel needs a 10” tread width and an 11” section width in order for the wheel sidewall to look flat.

Do a little research before buying so you know what to expect on the look. Good luck!
 

TwoK4drSi

Active Member
Apr 3, 2019
1,651
1,777
DFW
I feel like a broken record but here goes - please don't put inappropriately sized tires on your Model 3. We've had several documented cases of issues with the Traction Control/ABS/Stability systems due to undersized or oversized tires. The "safe" range is 26" to 26.8" (1.1% max difference from stock options).

If you feel like you need wider tires, step up to 265/30/20's. Of course, then you need wider wheels (9"+) which defeats the whole purpose of your goal regardless. The better option for stock 20" wheels is 245/35/20's.

The trick to curb protection is not hitting the curbs ;)

P.S. If you would like to put rolling cement blocks onto your car and ruin your efficiency, buy "run-flats" (which is a misnomer in itself, and far more aggravation then it is worth IMHO).
There is sorta a double positive when people do go with a 27” tire you’re not seeing...it raises battery/car height while reducing wheel gap. Essentially instead of lowering your car 1.5” to achieve the look you only need to lower 1.25” persay. That’s why people go 20” because visually it looks better and it also reduces the amount of visual sidewall so the car looks more lower than it is. I know it’s not ideal but for instance in my case I sorta have a steep driveway and I’m within 1/4” from scraping and not scraping.

natural human thinking is to have your cake and eat it too.
 
There is sorta a double positive when people do go with a 27” tire you’re not seeing...it raises battery/car height while reducing wheel gap. Essentially instead of lowering your car 1.5” to achieve the look you only need to lower 1.25” persay. I know it’s not ideal but for instance in my case I sorta have a steep driveway and I’m within 1/4” from scraping and not scraping.

natural human thinking is to have your cake and eat it too.

Hey - if it is working for you stick with it! We've just had several people buy over/under-sized tires and then come back on here to complain about issues. I know I would be really frustrated if I spent $1,100 on tires, plus mounting fees, only to have to remove them, sell/return them and buy another set and spend more money and time having new tires put on.
 
MasterC17. Are you saying larger rolling diameter on square setups are having issues with traction control, or staggered series with different rolling diameter front to rear?

I don’t see how square setups would have issues.

Appears to happen on both square and staggered. It's pretty easy to see why. Each wheel has a wheel speed sensor, and as the hub rotates around it measures how quickly that hub is rotating. When you have say a 27.3" overall diameter tire, but the car is expecting one that is 26.7", the tire will be rotating slower than the car is expecting, giving you a slower measured speed than actual speed. The Model 3 also has a GPS sensor to measure vehicle speed, and sensors in the drive unit(s) to determine speed based on motor RPM. So, if you are traveling 50mph at 5,000RPM (I'm just making up a random RPM here), but the car is expecting the car to be traveling 49mph at 5,000RPM, it seems to get confused and realize something doesn't make sense. The faster you drive the larger this gap becomes (at 100mph, the car will be expecting 98mph). I am guessing the car checks the expected speed versus motor RPM versus GPS speed and if those don't match up it kind of freaks out.

This happens on other cars too, not just Tesla. If Tesla gave us the ability to input the installed overall tire diameter, that would be an easy fix. But for now, we can only choose between the stock overall tire diameter options. Given a tire has ~8mm of usable tread, I think you are safe to go outside the "stock" window by 8mm (~3/10") in either direction - hence how I got 26"-26.8".

I have run a few tire sets with an overall diameter of 26.7" without any issue, FWIW. And of course, the further you stray from stock sizing the more obvious your problems are going to be.

Tesla's VDC is a very precise/intricate system. It kind of has to be considering the car is an EV with instant torque. It doesn't seem to take much to make it angry.

EDIT: Staggered within that range can also cause an issue, but I think it depends on how different they are front to rear. If we're talking about 4/10ths of an inch or more, you may have a problem. But if it's only 1 or 2/10ths, you will be fine. The car still must account for worn tires on one axle, and new ones on the other, etc.
 
Last edited:

lbowroom

Plaid, white with black, CF, 19’s. Delivered 8/27
Sep 12, 2018
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I did run a 285/35-19 on the rear with a 245/40-19 on the front with no issues, but that is just on the edge of your recommendations.

Absolute speed as reported by gps to wheel speed sensor for traction control just doesn’t seem like a place for software to look for a correlation, but ok.
 

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