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Model S battery and range

Good day,
This is my first post here. I am a proud owner of a nice Tesla Model S 75D from 2019 that I bought second hand just a few weeks ago.
I am thrilled about the car in general. The only thing that worries me now is the km range. On the panel I see that if I charge the battery at 100% I’ll have a range of 367km max. Considering that, in practice, I am not likely to drive for more than 280km before needing to charge (considering weather conditions, traffic, driving style etc), this seems quite a low range. Is that normal? Or should I have my battery checked by Tesla for potential faulty cells? Thanks
 
A couple things first to check.
The range value displayed can be selected to be one of two different values. In Europe I believe these are listed as "rated" and "typical".

Rated in Europe is based upon the NEDC test cycle which is generally considered to be overly optimistic and does not represent what most will see. Typical is closer to reality to most. You can select which of these get displayed, I believe under either the vehicle or display tabs on the main screen. If it's set on rated, first step is change it to typical.

Second is impact of ambient temperature. I see you're based in Netherlands so likely it is starting to get colder. Cold temperatures will also have a big impact on the actual range you can drive. This is because the level of energy use per km, shown on the trips display as your kWh/km value, will increase significantly. You've not stated anything for what level of energy use you are seeing, but i believe you need to be around 170 kWh/km to get something close to 1 km displayed typical range to 1 km actual range traveled. CAVEAT - that number is based upon my experience with my Model S in the US which is a different basis for the displayed range.

Also, in cold, if your car is parked outside overnight or during the day, you will use significantly more energy on shorter trips as the car is consuming a significant amount of energy to warm up the battery.

So my hypothesis based upon the little you've shared is the odds of there actually being an issue with your battery are low but what you are experiencing is likely a combination of the car showing the overly optimistic rated range value combined with the real world impacts of cold ambient driving much higher energy consumption.

Your best bet is to find a local owners group and talk to members in your area for what their experience is. Many can report as much as a 30-40% hit in range due to cold conditions, with a corresponding 50% increase in their kWh/km energy usage.
 

ucmndd

Well-Known Member
Mar 10, 2016
8,382
16,352
California
75D was advertised as 259 miles range (417 km) when new, so 367 represents ~12% degradation. That’s on the high end but not unheard of for a 75 (I own a 75 with ~12% degradation).

You will be wasting your time asking Tesla service to look at it. Also note that while the comments above mentioning weather are useful in terms of the actual real world range you can expect, it has nothing to do with the range number your car displays.
 
A couple things first to check.
The range value displayed can be selected to be one of two different values. In Europe I believe these are listed as "rated" and "typical".

Rated in Europe is based upon the NEDC test cycle which is generally considered to be overly optimistic and does not represent what most will see. Typical is closer to reality to most. You can select which of these get displayed, I believe under either the vehicle or display tabs on the main screen. If it's set on rated, first step is change it to typical.

Second is impact of ambient temperature. I see you're based in Netherlands so likely it is starting to get colder. Cold temperatures will also have a big impact on the actual range you can drive. This is because the level of energy use per km, shown on the trips display as your kWh/km value, will increase significantly. You've not stated anything for what level of energy use you are seeing, but i believe you need to be around 170 kWh/km to get something close to 1 km displayed typical range to 1 km actual range traveled. CAVEAT - that number is based upon my experience with my Model S in the US which is a different basis for the displayed range.

Also, in cold, if your car is parked outside overnight or during the day, you will use significantly more energy on shorter trips as the car is consuming a significant amount of energy to warm up the battery.

So my hypothesis based upon the little you've shared is the odds of there actually being an issue with your battery are low but what you are experiencing is likely a combination of the car showing the overly optimistic rated range value combined with the real world impacts of cold ambient driving much higher energy consumption.

Your best bet is to find a local owners group and talk to members in your area for what their experience is. Many can report as much as a 30-40% hit in range due to cold conditions, with a corresponding 50% increase in their kWh/km energy usage.
A couple things first to check.
The range value displayed can be selected to be one of two different values. In Europe I believe these are listed as "rated" and "typical".

Rated in Europe is based upon the NEDC test cycle which is generally considered to be overly optimistic and does not represent what most will see. Typical is closer to reality to most. You can select which of these get displayed, I believe under either the vehicle or display tabs on the main screen. If it's set on rated, first step is change it to typical.

Second is impact of ambient temperature. I see you're based in Netherlands so likely it is starting to get colder. Cold temperatures will also have a big impact on the actual range you can drive. This is because the level of energy use per km, shown on the trips display as your kWh/km value, will increase significantly. You've not stated anything for what level of energy use you are seeing, but i believe you need to be around 170 kWh/km to get something close to 1 km displayed typical range to 1 km actual range traveled. CAVEAT - that number is based upon my experience with my Model S in the US which is a different basis for the displayed range.

Also, in cold, if your car is parked outside overnight or during the day, you will use significantly more energy on shorter trips as the car is consuming a significant amount of energy to warm up the battery.

So my hypothesis based upon the little you've shared is the odds of there actually being an issue with your battery are low but what you are experiencing is likely a combination of the car showing the overly optimistic rated range value combined with the real world impacts of cold ambient driving much higher energy consumption.

Your best bet is to find a local owners group and talk to members in your area for what their experience is. Many can report as much as a 30-40% hit in range due to cold conditions, with a corresponding 50% increase in their kWh/km energy usage.
Thanks much. That makes sense.
 
Hi neighbor!
It looks right. Good rule of thumb: in summer, consider removing 20% from the displayed range. In winter, more like 30%. Or more if it gets below freezing point.
There is a very active sub for BeNe owners, don’t hesitate to post there.
Hey neighbour. Bedankt! I'll surely take a look
 
Thanks much. That makes sense.
Thanks much. That makes sense.

A couple things first to check.
The range value displayed can be selected to be one of two different values. In Europe I believe these are listed as "rated" and "typical".

Rated in Europe is based upon the NEDC test cycle which is generally considered to be overly optimistic and does not represent what most will see. Typical is closer to reality to most. You can select which of these get displayed, I believe under either the vehicle or display tabs on the main screen. If it's set on rated, first step is change it to typical.

Second is impact of ambient temperature. I see you're based in Netherlands so likely it is starting to get colder. Cold temperatures will also have a big impact on the actual range you can drive. This is because the level of energy use per km, shown on the trips display as your kWh/km value, will increase significantly. You've not stated anything for what level of energy use you are seeing, but i believe you need to be around 170 kWh/km to get something close to 1 km displayed typical range to 1 km actual range traveled. CAVEAT - that number is based upon my experience with my Model S in the US which is a different basis for the displayed range.

Also, in cold, if your car is parked outside overnight or during the day, you will use significantly more energy on shorter trips as the car is consuming a significant amount of energy to warm up the battery.

So my hypothesis based upon the little you've shared is the odds of there actually being an issue with your battery are low but what you are experiencing is likely a combination of the car showing the overly optimistic rated range value combined with the real world impacts of cold ambient driving much higher energy consumption.

Your best bet is to find a local owners group and talk to members in your area for what their experience is. Many can report as much as a 30-40% hit in range due to cold conditions, with a corresponding 50% increase in their kWh/km energy usage.
Indeed, I changed it to "rated" and the values increase substantially (albeit as you said, farther from reality). And you are right, weather here is already pretty cold. Moreover I haven't yet installed a home charger and when I take the car in the morning it takes a while until the battery gets warm, contributing to further decrease in range. Thanks for the tips. I'm still below in the learning curve.
 
The range estimation is also dependent on your previous consumption history. For eg if i do lot of short trips on city roads then estimation for the remaining range will come out a lot less. However if you go for long distance in one go the the range is estimation is higher…
In short just change your display settings to % display 😊 It takes some time to get used to it ;)
 
The range estimation is also dependent on your previous consumption history. For eg if i do lot of short trips on city roads then estimation for the remaining range will come out a lot less. However if you go for long distance in one go the the range is estimation is higher…
In short just change your display settings to % display 😊 It takes some time to get used to it ;)
You are likely confusing two different displays of range.

If you are looking at the energy display on the main screen there is a graph that shows recent energy usage with an average value and as estimate range shown on the right side of the graph. That range estimate is based upon your recent average usage with the exact value depending upon whether you have it set for 30 / 15 / 5 miles to display on the graph (sorry, don't recall the exact km breaks, but think maybe something like 10, 25, 50?).

However, if you are looking at the range displayed by the battery icon on the instrument cluster above the steering wheel, then that value does NOT consider your past energy use, but is based upon a fixed energy constant of Wh/mi (Wh/km).
 

Scott Fairchild

2014S,2016 X 90,2018 3, 2019 XRvn, 2021 Y, 2014S
Mar 27, 2016
819
763
Melbourne fl
I just bought a 2014 Model S 85 one-owner with 112,000 miles. It looks like new. What is so puzzling is that it was 4/5 charged and had 219 miles on it.
I thought the 85 charged to 208? It was built in September of 2014, but I don't understand the extended range. I go back to pick it up on Tuesday and I asked them to charge it fully. I would predict it will change out to about 250. What gives???
 

AMPd

Well-Known Member
Nov 27, 2012
5,009
5,339
Northern California
I just bought a 2014 Model S 85 one-owner with 112,000 miles. It looks like new. What is so puzzling is that it was 4/5 charged and had 219 miles on it.
I thought the 85 charged to 208? It was built in September of 2014, but I don't understand the extended range. I go back to pick it up on Tuesday and I asked them to charge it fully. I would predict it will change out to about 250. What gives???
No the 208 miles is for the 60kwh equipped model s. The 85 had an epa range of 265 if I’m not mistaken.
 
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