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Model S Manual Screencaps (and some others)

AnOutsider

S532 # XS27
Moderator
Apr 3, 2009
11,958
210
So there was a rudimentary version of the Model S user's manual on one of the betas @ westchester and I took a (crappy) video of it. Here's some screencaps of the video while I try to figure out how to get it to be smaller than its current .5 GB for uploading:

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These last 4 show the range and standard charge setting screen, a quick shot of the internet radio (which should be available at launch) and how navigation will work with Google Maps. I was able to enter a place to search for, then I got a pin and a button to "nav" to it. Unfortunately pressing that button did nothing no matter how much I tried (and try I did). The rep (wendy) thought it might be because the internet was slow there (I barely had service on my own phone and the map took forever to load until I took it out of satellite mode). Supposedly this will give you standard directions you get by going online to Google Maps -- they apparently just won't update as you go or speak out loud/be integrated into the dash in front of the steering wheel.

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*edit* here's the full video (there's a couple other ones, but nothing new in 'em)

[video=vimeo;42909060]https://vimeo.com/42909060[/video]
 
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I was fascinated by the emergency door open backup slide... place the fob in the right front fender.
I just had never thought about how to unlock a car if the fob is dead - if there's no key.

Now I'm even more excited about being an owner. Huge thanks, AnOutsider! Post your full video on YouTube, please! :)
 

Jeeps17

Cath Jockey in a P85
Mar 17, 2012
1,032
459
Montreal, Canada
Thank you very much to have taken the time to post these pictures!

I can imagine many pacemaker / ICD recipients must be a bit nervous though...

To reassure most, recent generation pace / defib generators are quite resistant to interference. Although it is of course always possible (given the enormous number of different models on the market and in patients), I would be very surprised to learn of actual device malfunction caused by the vehicle.

Having your pacemaker 22 cm from any transmitter is also easy to achieve when sitting in the car, considering the typical implantation sites (left > right subclavian or rarely upper abdomen).

I see this more as a disclaimer from Tesla in case of litigation.
 
Last edited:

Lloyd

Well-Known Member
Supporting Member
Jan 12, 2011
6,412
2,347
San Luis Obispo, CA
I see this more as a disclaimer from Tesla in case of litigation.

Devices that have risk of altering a pacemaker from American Heart Association:

Anti-theft systems (also called electronic article surveillance or EAS): Interactions with EAS systems are unlikely to cause clinically significant symptoms in most patients. However, the American Heart Association recommends that you:
•Be aware that EAS systems may be hidden or camouflaged in entrances and exits in many businesses.
•Don't stay near the EAS system longer than is necessary.
•Don't lean against the system.

Metal detectors for security: Interactions with metal detectors are unlikely to cause clinically significant symptoms in most patients. However, the American Heart Association recommends that you:
•Don't stay near the metal detector longer than is necessary.
•Don't lean against the system.
•If scanning with a hand-held metal detector is necessary, tell the security personnel that you have a pacemaker. Ask them not to hold the metal detector near the device any longer than is absolutely necessary. Or ask for an alternative form of personal search.

Cell phones: Currently, phones available in the United States (less than 3 watts) don't appear to damage pulse generators or affect how the pacemaker works.
•Technology is rapidly changing as the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) makes new frequencies available.
•Newer cellphones using these new frequencies might make pacemakers less reliable.
•A group of cellphone companies is studying that possibility.
•Bluetooth® headsets do not appear to interfere with pacemakers.

MP3 player headphones: Most contain a magnetic substance and research has documented that placing the headphones too close to the pacemaker caused interference.

Keep your headphones at least 1.2 inches (3 cm) away from your pacemaker.


Never rest your head on the chest of a person with pacemaker while you're wearing headphones.


Both the earbud and clip-on types of headphones can cause interference.


Do not place headphones in a breast pocket or drape them over your chest.


Extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy (ESWL): a noninvasive treatment that uses hydraulic shocks to dissolve kidney stones.
•This procedure may be done safely in most pacemaker patients, with some reprogramming of the pacing.
•You'll need careful follow-up after the procedure and for several months to be sure your pacemaker is working properly.
•ESWL should be avoided in patients with certain kinds of pacemakers implanted in the abdomen.
•Discuss your specific case with your doctor before and after the treatment.

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): a noninvasive diagnostic tool that uses a powerful magnet to produce images of internal organs and functions.
•Metal objects are attracted to the magnet and are normally not allowed near MRI machines.
•The magnet can interrupt the pacing and inhibit the output of pacemakers.
•If MRI must be done, the pacemaker output in some models can be reprogrammed.
•Discuss with your doctor the possible risks and benefits before you undergo MRI scanning.

Power-generating equipment, arc welding equipment and powerful magnets: Such as found in some medical devices, heavy equipment or motors can inhibit pulse generators.
•If you work closely with or near such equipment, be aware of the risk that your pacemakers may not work properly in those conditions.
•Follow your healthcare provider's instructions about being around such equipment.

Radiofrequency ablation (RFA): A medical procedure that uses radio waves to manage a wide variety of arrhythmias.
•RFA is usually performed before the pacemaker is implanted.
•Studies have shown that most permanent pacemakers aren't adversely affected by radio frequencies during catheter ablation.
•However, if RFA is performed with a pacemaker, a variety of changes in your pacemaker are possible during and after the treatment.
•Your doctor should carefully evaluate your pacing system after the procedure.

Short-wave or microwave diathermy: A medical procedure that uses high-frequency, high-intensity signals for physical therapy. These may bypass your pacemaker's noise protection and interfere with or permanently damage the pulse generator.

Therapeutic radiation (such as for cancer treatment): May damage the pacemaker's circuits.
•The degree of damage is unpredictable and may vary with different systems.
•The risk is significant and builds up as the radiation dose increases.
•The American Heart Association recommends that the pacemaker be shielded as much as possible and moved if it lies directly in the radiation field.
•If you depend on your pacemaker for normal heart pacing, your electrocardiogram (ECG) should be monitored during the treatment, and your pulse generator should be tested often after and between radiation sessions.

Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS): A medical device used to relieve acute or chronic pain with electrodes placed on the skin and connected to a pulse generator.
•Most studies have shown that TENS rarely inhibits bipolar pacing.
•It may sometimes briefly inhibit unipolar pacing. This can be treated by reprogramming the pulse generator
 

Jeeps17

Cath Jockey in a P85
Mar 17, 2012
1,032
459
Montreal, Canada
Thanks Lloyd,

I was aware of all of these (I am a cardiologist), but just wanted to reassure pacemaker / ICD implantees that sitting in the model S is extremely unlikely to cause a problem.

I doubt anyone will choose to have focal chest radiation therapy while sitting in their car, or to drive it anywhere near an MRI magnet (in which case the car is in more danger than the driver) :wink:
 

gg_got_a_tesla

Model S: VIN 65513, Model 3: VIN 1913
Jan 29, 2010
6,534
789
Redwood Shores, CA
AO's the man!

So, "Passive Unlocking and Locking" is the feature that'd be DOA at launch, right? If not, what does that mean?

Also, what's the difference between 'unlocking the trunk' (achieved with button 2) and 'opening the rear liftgate' (button 1)? Particularly when the liftgate's not powered (i.e. no tech pkg)?

Love the personalization aspects though (as GeorgeB promised) - ability to do all-door unlocking with one click, walk-away locking...
 

AnOutsider

S532 # XS27
Moderator
Apr 3, 2009
11,958
210
So if you loose internet do you loose map usefulness?

That's what I understand, yes. I suppose if you got a directions list before you lost connectivity that list will still be available, but I can't confirm because we couldn't get it to work.

Another thing I found out (which was a minor concern for some), is that you CAN actually turn off the screen. I'm not sure if audio continues to play or not, but you can have the whole screen go dark and distraction-less. Tapping it again wakes it up

I'll try to compress the video and get it uploaded when I get home. I'll have to use some software because you may notice the video is actually sideways ;) (I rotated the screenshots)
 

John M

Rdstr#526-S Sig Perf#256
Jul 27, 2009
15
0
Pasadena CA
Thanks Lloyd,

....just wanted to reassure pacemaker / ICD implantees that sitting in the model S is extremely unlikely to cause a problem.

Not to derail this tread, but since it’s been brought up, this is a subject close to my heart (literally). About 3 wks ago I had an ICD implanted. Oddly enough, I didn’t think to ask about any issues driving an electric car until the follow-up. My cardiologist didn’t know, called Boston Scientific, they couldn’t answer offhand, but were going to get back. I’ve been away so will contact the doc next wk to find out what he learned, if anything. I’ve avoided driving my Roadster, mainly to any strain to the incision area from getting my butt in and out of the tiny thing. B.S. specifically addresses not leaning over leaning over open hoods & alternators, but riding in an ICE auto is OK. Also seem to say stay 24” away from welders and electric motors/generators (no discussion of size). My hunch is that it will be OK to drive the Roadster and absolutely OK to drive the S, especially since the motor is much farther away. I’ve checked the web & there only seems to be discussion on hybrids…with no apparent problems. No discussion of pure electrics. Tesla apparently does not warn of any motor/generator or battery issues with medical devices, only transmitter interference. This is good news, since my Sig S may be here sooner than expected!
 

Jeeps17

Cath Jockey in a P85
Mar 17, 2012
1,032
459
Montreal, Canada
I'll try to compress the video and get it uploaded when I get home. I'll have to use some software because you may notice the video is actually sideways ;) (I rotated the screenshots)

Video ! Outstanding !

This is good news, since my Sig S may be here sooner than expected!

John, although I absolutely agree that you should check with your device manufacturer for possible issues with your model of ICD, I would be shocked if there was a problem with the model S (pun intended :biggrin:). Not sure about the roadster, since the electric engine is likely closer to you.
 

John M

Rdstr#526-S Sig Perf#256
Jul 27, 2009
15
0
Pasadena CA
Jeeps17, thanks for the reassurance! I guess I could come to grips with not being able to drive the roadster for a couple of months, waiting for the S; but not being able to drive and electric car at all...that would be a READ BUMMER!!!

I'm sure that all device manufacturers will have to address the subject specifically, as all electric cars become more commonplace.
 

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