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Model X 100D total Range

Discussion in 'The UK and Ireland' started by cubbie, Oct 11, 2017.

  1. cubbie

    cubbie Member

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    i just charged my Model X 100D to 100% to find the total mileage was 281 miles. But I do remember when I bought the car they said it would charge up to 350 miles.
    I am I missing something here why I am I missing 70 miles on a full charge

    Has anyone had the same problem
     
  2. SabrToothSqrl

    SabrToothSqrl Active Member

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  3. arg

    arg Supporting Member

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    You can set the range display to show either "Typical" miles, or "Rated miles", or percentage. "Rated" is the range on the official, Government-endorsed NEDC test; you will never get this in real-life driving unless making extreme effort to be economical. "Typical" is the range for what Tesla consider "typical" driving (NB. it's not YOUR typical driving, nor affected by how you have been driving recently, it's a fixed conversion of the amount of energy in the battery to how far it would go driven in the "typical" way). You can achieve "typical" range in normal driving on A-roads, or on motorways at a shade under 70MPH.

    So, you can easily get the big number on the dash if you want, but the "typical" number is much more useful. Some people consider that neither is really useful and prefer the percentage display (personally, I like "typical" but can see the point of view of the "percentage" people; I can't imagine any good reason for leaving it set on "Rated").

    Note that the above refers to UK cars - US cars have "Rated" and "Ideal" as their rating system is different.


    As an aside, for the case where you actually care about range ("Will I reach my destination?"), you can get a much more accurate estimate by putting your destination into the navigation system and looking at the energy graph - that will make a range estimate based on the speeds and climbs on your actual route, rather than the fixed conversions.
     
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  4. WannabeOwner

    WannabeOwner Active Member

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    Just to add to @arg comment, in case not something you are aware of as yet, but when you put the Destination into SatNav and display the TRIP Energy Graph, you get an additional line showing "actual" which is superimposed on the Estimate as you drive along, so that you can see if that is above / below the estimate, and also what the "energy left at destination" is predicted to be - so if it is tight you can slow down / drive behind a truck (you don't have to be THAT close for it to help) or if it shows you have plenty then you can speed up. I rarely have a long journey that doesn't involve a 50-stretch for Traffic or Roadworks, and that usually takes care of situations where its a bit tight, and then I can speed up again :)

    I sincerely hope that no salesperson told you that a 100D had a range of 350 miles ...
     
  5. WannabeOwner

    WannabeOwner Active Member

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    A picture might help, first one out of Google; its an old version of the firmware, but good enough

    [​IMG]

    EDIT: Just spotted that that article also had a graph showing "not enough juice" too

    [​IMG]

    :eek::eek::eek::eek::eek:
     
  6. DJP31

    DJP31 Member

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    I find the graph to be really helpful in alleviating my wife's range anxiety and proving the battery management system is so much better than on mobile phones, where the "range equivalent" can drop like a stone for no good reason. I'm sure this is why people look at me as if I'm mad for having a battery car, all they can equate it to is the phone dying and that being the end of the world as they know it :eek:
     
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  7. Troy

    Troy Active Member

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    #7 Troy, Oct 11, 2017
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2017
    Hi, @cubbie. It was an excellent choice to create this thread in the UK section instead of the Model X section because Tesla cars in North America use different range units but many people from North America are not aware of this. Therefore it creates lots of confusion when somebody from Europe starts a thread about range in the Model S or X section.

    In the settings menu, you can select between Typical and Rated range. Right now you have Typical range selected. If you select Rated, you will see around 351 miles. However, you should leave it at Typical range because it is an excellent range unit. Rated range means NEDC rated range which stands for New European Driving Cycle. Tesla has to use this useless range unit because it is the official range unit they use in Europe. You can't blame Tesla for the NEDC rated range. It has nothing to do with Tesla and it existed before Tesla.

    You might say, why don't all EVs in Europe use Typical range instead of NEDC rated range? Because Typical range is something Tesla created. It does not exist outside of Tesla. They will replace NEDC with something realistic in September 2018 called WLTP. In other words, when you open the Model X design Studio in September 2018, it will display around 281 miles for the Model X 100D if there is a Model X 100D at that time. Next year, you should expect a software update from Tesla that replaces NEDC with WLTP.

    By the way, if you want to participate in a Tesla battery survey, feel free to enter your data here. After you have entered your data to the next available row, you can then go to the charts page and select your username.
     
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  8. JonG

    JonG Member

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    It’s also worth noting “typical” is rarely typical. You’d be doing well to get it, especially in winter.
     
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  9. cubbie

    cubbie Member

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    Hi Many thanks for your informative reply.
    I can see now the rated and the typical buttons. Can I clarify that my 100d will do 281 miles approx on a full charge and not the 351 miles quoted on Tesla website ?
     
  10. cubbie

    cubbie Member

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    Thanks for great reply
    When I purchased the vehicle this was never explained to me. All that was said was about the 351 miles on a full charge. I don’t have range anxiety as I have just driven from England to Spain and made full use of the superchargers. I just wished it had been explained more fully.
    I use the navigation for a accurate reading.
    Many thanks for the replies as I have waiting two days for Tesla to comeback with an answer.
     
  11. cubbie

    cubbie Member

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    Hi
    On the website it clearly states the 100kw battery provides 351 miles of range so that’s what I expected a full charged battery to go to. It mentions nothing about rated or typical ranges. Is this not misleading buyers ?
     
  12. cezdoc

    cezdoc Member

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    The problem with range is it depends on so many variables. Sure you can "achieve" 351 miles of range, but you'll need to keep your speed below 50 mph and drive in mild weather. But I've just had a look and in particular for the Model X you have to do a bit of digging (i.e. scroll to the bottom of the custom order page) to find any small print about NEDC range stats. The Model S page at least has a range calculator which shows the impact of speed, temperature etc. on range (but is still too optimistic in my opinion).

    I think the range should have been explained clearly when you purchased the car, but I wasn't around to see what questions were asked and what replies were given. It's such an obvious topic though (after "how do I charge" and "what if I run out") I'm surprised you were just told "the range of the vehicle is 351 miles".

    When I researched my Model S two years ago the sales staff were very good about an idea of real-world range and the loss you can expect in winter etc. But I also seem to remember the range calculator was a bit more realistic - I don't recall seeing 300+ mile claims on the website for a S75.
     
  13. WannabeOwner

    WannabeOwner Active Member

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    I don't know the answer to that ... its the "Government Official Figure", so comparable with any other car's figure that you might have chosen to compare against. I don't think Tesla tries to pretend anything in particular about range, but if that's the ONLY figure on the website then, at the very least, it is not helpful.

    In terms of range, and in case helpful:

    My MS P90D has a 100% range of about 220 driveable miles at temperatures that are neither Hot nor Cold.

    I plan a journey so that I have a 20 mile buffer, and I normally only charge to 90%, so that's 180 mile range. I then assume adverse weather, even in summer, and for any journey that is 160+ miles I charge to 100%. Spirited driving :) and torrential rain will cut my 100% range down to close to 160 miles, and in Winter my consumption is a fair bit more than in Summer.

    A non-P car will have better range, and for any journey where range is an issue then just slowing to 50 MPH (which usually happens for a stretch of roadworks / traffic anyway) will help. In 27,000 miles I've only had one really squeaky moment, when i got home with 2 miles to spare (160 mile round trip, nice Summer day, drove like the clappers on the outbound leg, arrived spot on 50% with no need to rush on the return but absolutely torrential, unexpected, rain on the return), so in general terms I have had no problem with range, although I do do some planning for journeys that are more than 100% range - 220 miles for me - and give some extra thought to journeys that are 160+ miles - which might only be to charge to 100%, or it might be to make sure that there is a charging option en route if I need it.

    Flip side: on plenty of, longer, journeys I have expected to need to charge "a lot" / "quite a lot" but in practice, because of congestion etc. I have actually needed to charge less, and thus had a shorter stop. I expect it is a common learning-curve thing, but when the car was new if I stopped to charge I would charge "plenty", now I only charge just enough to get to destination (with 20 mile buffer). 10 minutes will get me a 50 mile top-up, so if I leave with 100% charge my range is 200 miles + 50 mile topup (and an additional 20 mile buffer) and, for me, a 250 mile journey benefits from that 10 minute Pee & Coffee stop, and journeys of more than 250 miles in a day are very rare, so in practical terms I've been perfectly happy.

    Hopefully that is reassuring, but of course no help if you have been sold a 350 mile range solution.

    By my extrapolation an MS P100D would be 250 miles, probably another 15%? more - say 290 miles - for a non-P version, but MX uses a bit more juice than an MS, so your MX 100D saying 281 miles at 100% charge sounds about right
     
  14. WannabeOwner

    WannabeOwner Active Member

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    I found these figures:

    323 Wh/mi Aug
    347 Wh/mi Sep
    371 Wh/mi Oct
    407 Wh/mi Nov
    417 Wh/mi Dec
    428 Wh/mi Jan
    447 Wh/mi Feb - that would be equivalent to a 100% range of only 160 miles
     
  15. DJP31

    DJP31 Member

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    And something else to throw into the mix, the usable battery renders simple comparison between what a 90 will achieve against a 100 inaccurate. From memory the 90 has 82/83 ish kWh whereas the 100 has 98 kWh ish. I'm "ishing" as I'm not certain about the actual numbers but suffice to say there is considerably more than 10% difference between the two usables. .
     
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  16. JonG

    JonG Member

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    You are right, its about 20% more on a 100.
     
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  17. arg

    arg Supporting Member

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    But was that on a single trip of significant length? In fact, if it was anything less than a trip to the bitter end, you would expect to have got improving Wh/mile if you had carried on.

    Winter average Wh/mile figures can be very poor if you do short length trips, but of course that doesn't matter much as you aren't pushing the range under those conditions.
     
  18. DJP31

    DJP31 Member

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    @arg I ordered mine at the end of Oct last year, and remember reading lots of posts from owners who'd bought their cars during the summer and were seeing their Wh/m going through the roof over the winter months. I collected mine on the 1st March and 9k fabulous miles :D later my "lifetime" is now 322 Wh/h, having recently crept up form 319 Wh/m :eek:.

    Many of my journeys are approx 3 miles with a gap in between and about 25 miles a day. It'll be interesting to see how "bad" it gets, but as you rightly say it's irrelevant as I'll be home well before the battery changes from green.

    I suppose if my average leapt to 3000 Wh/m I might have a problem but don't think I'll worry too much about that too much ;)
     
  19. cubbie

    cubbie Member

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    Hi
    I appreciate your reply and explanation
     
  20. Troy

    Troy Active Member

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    #20 Troy, Oct 13, 2017
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2017
    Hi. Your real-world range will most likely be below 281 miles. It might be somewhere between 250 to 270 miles. You can actually calculate this from your lifetime Wh/mi number. On the touchscreen, go to "Controls > Trips", and read your lifetime Wh/mi number. The 100 kWh battery has 98,400 Wh usable capacity when new. Let's say your lifetime efficiency is 370 Wh/mi. That means your real-world range when the car was new would be 98,400/370= 266 miles.

    In case you want to compare your real-world range to other people, you can open this page and find your car model in cell B96 (scroll down to row 96). Here you can see that 3 people who participated in this survey have entered their lifetime Wh/mi number for the Model X 100D. Their average is 391.6 Wh/mi which means 251.3 miles real world range when the car was new. However, they are from mainland Europe. Because of the cold climate there compared to the UK, your lifetime Wh/mi number should be better (lower) than 391.6 Wh/mi unless you usually drive at high speeds.

    They will get rid of the 351 miles number shown on the UK design studio here and replace it with something like 279 miles in September 2018. The EU has been working on fixing this since 2012 and all they did to fix it was to copy what the USA is doing.
     
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