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Model X 100D total Range

Discussion in 'The UK and Ireland' started by cubbie, Oct 11, 2017.

  1. cubbie

    cubbie Member

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    Hi Troy
    I really appreciate your in depth reply to my question and showing me how to calculate my wh/mi. As soon as it gets light this morning that will be the first I do.
    As each day goes by I am always learning something new about my Model X completely different to my Merc ML350 straight forward to drive and takes no time at all to get used to. I have been driving 47 years and this is the first car that is taking me the longest to get used to drive with all the new technology.
    Once again Troy I really appreciate your reply in getting me to understand this range issue.
    Where I am in Basildon there are not too many people to talk about the issues with the Tesla so it’s really handy being able to get the answers to questions through the TMC
    Thanks again
     
  2. WannabeOwner

    WannabeOwner Active Member

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    Mea culpa ... they were whole month figures from TeslaFi, but I didn't check the mileage.Only 457 miles driven in February

    <scratchesHead> now I remember, on 01-Feb I had a a flickering headlight and stopped driving the car on any journeys at night (which include work commute), couple of weeks lead time before Tesla could book it in for service, repair took a week or more, collected the car and drove half a dozen miles before noticing the airbag warning was on so not safe to drive, that took another couple of weeks to get fixed, finally got the car back on 18-Mar :(

    You might like to take a look at TeslaFi, it will record all your journeys and give you stats about usage etc. For sure you don't need to be a Numbers Whiz to own & drive a Tesla, but if that sort of thing interests you its a great piece of software. Also handy for "where was I on XXX" - business mileage, curiosity, all that sort of stuff.
     
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  3. cubbie

    cubbie Member

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    Hi Just checked my trips the total odemeter reads 2760.9 trip A and B read 2747.3 with average energy 367wh/mi
    So 98400/367= 268 miles
     
  4. Troy

    Troy Active Member

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    Hi, @cubbie. That's very good and it is as expected.
     
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  5. cubbie

    cubbie Member

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    Thanks for the info.
    It’s nice to know the car is running as it should. Just taking me a while getting used to it.
    Found the superchargers in france spaced out quite nicely, could do with a few more in Spain
     
  6. mrkisskiss

    mrkisskiss Member

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    I think it's perfectly natural when you first get a Tesla to obsess a bit over the range... I certainly did. I would try and keep the car at its recommended charge almost all the time... for some reason. I also got all the CHAdeMO cables and Type2-Type2 cables and charge network cards and everything; I've never used them.

    Bottom line; you'll get used to it pretty quickly and learn your own charging patterns. I've never pushed it like @WannabeOwner has with 2 miles spare - top marks, my man!!!

    My S P100D gets a 100% charge of 302 miles, up from 299 when I first got the car. in reality, I get about 280 miles of real world range. Unless I put my foot down, in which case I can just about get to the end of my road (albeit very quickly). :)

    I think the government figures also assume you weigh just slightly more than a pint glass. Your real world range will decrease as you put more people and luggage in the car, of course.

    Remember your car loses range overnight. It's worse in cold weather. In December, for example, you can arrive at a B&B on a Friday with 180 miles on your battery, yet leave on the Monday with 160 - even though your car hasn't moved. Do bear this in mind as we head into the colder months.

    After a few drives, the nav gets incredibly good at estimating your battery range and percentage, and will plan your trip around superchargers if it needs to. Bear in mind the logic it uses is to try and charge for as little time as possible, so sometimes it'll divert you to a nearby supercharger shortly after you set off for your trip, but you only sit there for ~10 minutes. It can make more sense to override this, and plough on to a supercharger nearer your destination (still well within range, of course). You can enjoy up your slightly longer charging time with a loo/coffee stop, and it means you'll have more range when you get to your destination.

    For example, if you go from Bristol -> London, with 123 miles of range, the nav will tell you to charge for 10 minutes or something at Bristol Gordano, meaning you'll get back to London with 18% on your battery. But, you're better off ignoring that and charging for slightly longer at the Reading supercharger, then you'll be ready for a coffee and a pee at that weird "Zest" place, and you'll get home with 55% on your battery. Much better!

    So there you go. Huh, no wonder there's a "Tesla Wave".

    Btw, at a service station recently someone asked me if my car worked in the rain. Because, you know, it's electric.
     
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  7. cubbie

    cubbie Member

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    Hi
    I totally agree with you when you said you bought all the cables and network cards. My normal day to day travelling is about 50 miles max so a quick charge at home is enough.
    Just in Spain at moment had no problem getting charges from the superchargers in france not so many in Spain.
    I always make sure I make plenty of stops I do not want to put myself in a position of will I make it or not. After all I would not do it in my Merc ML 350 so I am not going to start now
    Thanks for your reply
     
  8. WannabeOwner

    WannabeOwner Active Member

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    Thanks and all that, but I'm not planning to do it again!

    IME (in your example) the charge at Reading would be shorter because I would have got held up in traffic somewhere and used less than expected, but if not I would be better able to predict my arrival charge, given that most of the journey has already been done, so I can charge just enough to get to destination. I much prefer "charge closer to destination" for that reason, and also to ensure that the battery is below 70% when I leave the Supercharger (assuming that is sufficient to get to destination), because fastest charging rate is between 10% to 70% (I believe charging when the battery is very low can be slower because the it needs to be charged more gently, but that's irrelevant if only charging off the mains)

    One other thing which I have just re-remembered is to charge on arrival at destination, not before departure, in Winter. Charging a cold battery can be much slower than charging a warm one. All other things being equal charging for 30 - 60 minutes, at least, before departure will ensure the battery is warm when you leave, otherwise in cold weather regen is limited.

    None of this matters much, except on range-limited journeys, although having a warm battery, and full regen, in Winter is nice - but its more hassle than I want to work out when-to-start-charge based on when you want charging to finish - until Tesla build "Finish charging at" into the software. Most apps don't want to have the responsibility of doing it in case of powercut (and not enough charge at departure), or for some reason they stop a charge and then cannot resume it shortly before departure)
     
  9. Anode

    Anode Member

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    Such great info above! Like you I was totally surprised (disappointed?) when my first day I drove my MX 100D it was on a mostly motorway road trip and I was expecting 350 miles but got 220. Over the last 4 months of ownership I’ve got to understand how the car works so much better. Regen is huge for eg (almost never use the brakes); motorway needs to be below 75 mph. Overall real world experience at least for me anyway is somewhere between 220 and 280 miles from 100% full charge to zero (which means practical range perhaps 200-260 miles).
     
  10. 12Pack

    12Pack ..

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    Found this graph as reported by a You-tuber, with my observations in red. At motorway speeds, each 5 mph increment increases battery usage (Wh/mile) by 10% So indeed, keep the speed down on the motorways.

    upload_2017-10-16_10-7-44.png
     
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  11. WannabeOwner

    WannabeOwner Active Member

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    Someone who is better at maths then me! :

    Does 10% reduction in power, for 5 MPH reduction in speed, simply equate to 10% increase in range?

    So if I reduce from 75 MPH to 70 MPH I get 10% more range?

    And then from 70 MPH to 65 MPH 10% more range, i.e. from 75 MPH to 65 MPH is 21% increase in range?

    Thanks
     
  12. 12Pack

    12Pack ..

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    Yes. The slope of the dark blue line (between say 65 mph and 95 mph) says that if you reduce your speed by 5 mph, then the usage of the battery (Watt-hr/mile) reduces by 10%, increasing your range by 10%. That's an overall approximation

    More specifically, per the graph, going from 75 mph (~325 Wh/mile) to 65 mph (~275 Wh/mile) gives you about 15% more range
     
  13. WannabeOwner

    WannabeOwner Active Member

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    Ah, that's a better idea, thanks.

    75 MPH - 65 MPH = 15%
    75 MPH - 60 MPH = 23% - 325 Wh/m to 250 Wh/m
    75 MPH - 55 MPH = 31% - 325 Wh/m to 225 Wh/m
    75 MPH - 50 MPH = 35% - 325 Wh/m to 210 Wh/m
    --
    75 MPH - 30 MPH = 54% - 325 Wh/m to 150 Wh/m - if desperate!

    80 MPH - 70 MPH = 15% - 350 Wh/m to 300 Wh/m
    80 MPH - 60 MPH = 31% - 350 Wh/m to 250 Wh/m
    80 MPH - 50 MPH = 43% - 350 Wh/m to 210 Wh/m
    --
    80 MPH - 30 MPH = 62% - 350 Wh/m to 150 Wh/m - if desperate!
     
  14. arg

    arg Supporting Member

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    If it was in fact a graph of power against speed, then it wouldn't mean that (since the power would now need to be consumed over a longer period of time to achieve the same distance).

    However, this particular graph is Wh/mile (energy per mile, not power), so your calculation is right.

    I think the graph is rather old however, and refers to the Roadster (I'm pretty sure it was the illustration from this blog article, though the actual graphics seem to have got lost).

    The actual numbers for the Model S are probably slightly different (though likely to be the same shape).
     
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  15. WannabeOwner

    WannabeOwner Active Member

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    Out of sad, geeky, curiosity I've often thought that I'd go out at night along the dual carriageway for a stretch between two junctions and do fixed speed, round trip, tests at various speeds to see how the consumption compared in the real world.

    I used to think that broken nights was an old-age thing, but then i gave up alcohol and haven't missed a wink's sleep since, but if I can't sleep one night I'll let you know how the test went :cool:
     
  16. cezdoc

    cezdoc Member

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    Your proposed experiment reminded me of a post on SpeakEV from a while back where this experiment was carried out in the Fens. There are plenty of Tesla drivers out there wanting to fulfil their sad, geeky curiosity!
    Wh/mi measurements on a 90
    The theory is that the energy needed for a trip should be proportional to speed^2 once air resistance dominates.
     
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  17. 12Pack

    12Pack ..

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    I posted it - it was a screen capture from one of the You-tubers running an experiment on his Model S - but he quoted having obtained it from Tesla engineers?
    I don't think the graph can be used with absolute numbers, but it gives a relative idea, and that aerodymanics (and hence its relationship to speed) is the major contributor .
     
  18. 12Pack

    12Pack ..

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    Speed wh/mi ..... Miles
    35 .......236 .......364
    40 .......245 .......351
    45 ....... 260 .......330
    50 ....... 280 .......307
    55 ....... 295 .......291
    60 ....... 330 .......260
    65 ....... 360 .......239
    70 ....... 390 .......220
    75 ....... 433 .......198
    80 ....... 500 .......172
    Indeed this is then additional data that supports a rule of thumb that at highway speeds a 5mph increase (going from 70 to 75mph) increases Wh/mi by ~10% with a corresponding decrease in range.
     
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  19. arg

    arg Supporting Member

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    As I say, it was originally published in that Tesla blog item from 2008, though the reorganization of Tesla's website seems to have lost the pictures. I've now found the original on the Wayback machine - it's worth a read (and has another graph directly of speed/range):

    Tesla Motors - Engineering

    Absolutely.
     
  20. WannabeOwner

    WannabeOwner Active Member

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    500 wh/mi at 80 MPH seems very high compared to my (recollection of my) experience, so I had a look at several journeys in TeslaFi and TeslaLog - hoping to include some figures / graphics - but even on journeys where I had relatively constant speed for prolonged periods the wh/mi they show is all over the place :( None that high though.

    I'll just have to set my alarm clock and do a middle-of-night run as a test ...
     

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