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Model X Energy Consumption Rate

FequalsMA

Member
Mar 10, 2016
282
75
Hong Kong
I have a MS. My experience is that once you have lots of fast accelerations or uphills, the average spikes up. People who drive on the island side have much higher averages.

just wanna echo this comment.
Regardless if it's ICE or EV, efficiency takes a massive loss when it comes to elevation inclines (especially when you have the urge to take it at speed in a high torque capable tesla)
 

flyingbathtub

Member
Nov 2, 2016
121
30
Hong Kong
just wanna echo this comment.
Regardless if it's ICE or EV, efficiency takes a massive loss when it comes to elevation inclines (especially when you have the urge to take it at speed in a high torque capable tesla)
But at least for a EV you recoup some of that potential energy on the way down to charge the battery instead of having all the energy dissipated as waste heat on the brakes
 

FequalsMA

Member
Mar 10, 2016
282
75
Hong Kong
But at least for a EV you recoup some of that potential energy on the way down to charge the battery instead of having all the energy dissipated as waste heat on the brakes

Regen is true. In an ICE you can still coast downhill but yes gotta take it out on the brakes at the end.

Aside from efficiency, there's a added strain put on mechanical parts and engine (ie: small displacement engines going uphill). I'm going to take a guess that there isn't as much strain on an electric motor and the penalty is largely decreased efficiency. i'm open to being proven wrong though if anyone has a definitive explanation.
 
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Optic

Member
Nov 10, 2014
198
14
Hong Kong
From experience, the consumption is about 20% more than the S. Hopefully it will improve as my tires gets broken in. 20% translates to about 15% lost in range (MS85D vs MX90D).
 

Optic

Member
Nov 10, 2014
198
14
Hong Kong
what is your wheel size though?

MS85D 19in MX90D 20in... Theoretically as tires get used, they should consume less... But losing 15% range is quite annoying because, it pushes me almost into the range of needing to charge twice a week. There are more cars at the office now, so it's also harder to get a charging slot. Thank god for the reinstating the FRT ;)
 

FequalsMA

Member
Mar 10, 2016
282
75
Hong Kong
MS85D 19in MX90D 20in... Theoretically as tires get used, they should consume less... But losing 15% range is quite annoying because, it pushes me almost into the range of needing to charge twice a week. There are more cars at the office now, so it's also harder to get a charging slot. Thank god for the reinstating the FRT ;)

that added weight really does a number.
22"'s on the X are gonna sap even more range.
 

mattse

Member
Mar 15, 2016
117
29
Hong Kong
I explored ways to find the lowest Wh/km and found that what matters most is starting from stop. We have a very heavy car. Model S is more than 2 tons, X is even heavier. Starting from stop uses most energy. That's why you waste a lot in stop and go traffic. If you can be gentle on this, your figures will look a lot better. If I keep the motor output at around 50kW when starting from stop, I already beat most ICE at traffic lights. And it seems my car also find this value gentle enough, you may consider doing the same if you are energy conscious.

There are times when I needed to keep the motor output at 200kW to overtake highway traffic, effect on Wh/km is not too obvious, perhaps the time at 200kW was too short

Another point is constant speed, I know how good it feels to accelerate and brake and accelerate especially on highways in a Tesla, but it hurts your Wh/km SO much. With constant speed, you can make use of the inertia and keep the car's heavy weight on our side

Regen, make good use of it, step on the brake pedal when your speed is around 10 / 20, it helps a lot

Hill doesn't cause too much trouble. As many has pointed out above, you will regen on the way down. But I noticed the car regen more at higher speed when going down (don't know why) compared with slowing down before or when coming down, so try not to slow down

Air-con, effect not apparent when comparing summer with winter values. Probably I use some energy warming the battery in winter and some energy to run the air-con in summer

Tyre pressure, don't forget getting it right even we don't need to visit gas stations now
 

mattse

Member
Mar 15, 2016
117
29
Hong Kong
One more thing, top speed. I will keep the discussion healthy and within legal boundary ;)

I know according to Tesla's website, driving at 70 km/hr use less energy than 80 km/hr. But from my real world experience, it's the other way round...

Make sure you use the TACC, especially if the legal limit is 70 km/hr. +10 km/hr will not activate speed cam. To be safe, better keep it at +9 km/hr though
 

zoopido

Member
Sep 20, 2015
9
5
Hong Kong
After a month of driving I've managed to lower my average around 270 kw from 300 on my X90D. I mainly do city driving only - during a few visits to the airport I got as low as 220.
 

Optic

Member
Nov 10, 2014
198
14
Hong Kong
My problem so far is not the kw/hr, but it seems like the calculation is a bit off. For example, if I charge the battery up to 100% and then drive ~30km and use 9kwh, i should have 90% left. but it seems like i have less than that say about 88%. These are estimates. But the driving power usage does not equal lost charge on the battery. There is some magic power drain that is shown in the trip screen.
 

punter

Member
Oct 23, 2016
35
25
Hong Kong
I wonder how the calculation handles battery drain that happens when the car isn't in use (overheat protection, vampire drain, etc)? Would this be averaged into the km/kwh number of would that number reflect only usage when the car is in active use?
 

Optic

Member
Nov 10, 2014
198
14
Hong Kong
I wonder how the calculation handles battery drain that happens when the car isn't in use (overheat protection, vampire drain, etc)? Would this be averaged into the km/kwh number of would that number reflect only usage when the car is in active use?

Power drain when you are not driving is not part of the trip monitor's averaged out power usage. My problem with the X (looks different than the S) is that left over power does not equal used power from trip monitor. There is some vampire drain that is no longer included in the trip meter. I don't idle the car, leave it over night, or park it. It was pure end to end driving. The difference is some 20% of power usage which means range gets deducted 20%.
 

mattse

Member
Mar 15, 2016
117
29
Hong Kong
use 9kwh, i should have 90% left. but it seems like i have less than that say about 88%

I guess you are talking about 9 kWh is 10% of 90 kWh, that's why you are expecting only 10% gone for 9 kWh used?

If so, 90 kWh model doesn't give you 90 kWh real capacity

Tesla’s hacked Battery Management System exposes the real usable capacity of its battery packs
  • 90D/P90D – ~85.8 kWh total capacity, 81.8 kWh usable
So 9 kWh is about 11% of your usable capacity

It takes really long time to charge to exact 100% and the display may show 100% once you reach 99.x%. That may explain the remaining 1% due to round off
 

Optic

Member
Nov 10, 2014
198
14
Hong Kong
I guess you are talking about 9 kWh is 10% of 90 kWh, that's why you are expecting only 10% gone for 9 kWh used?

If so, 90 kWh model doesn't give you 90 kWh real capacity

Tesla’s hacked Battery Management System exposes the real usable capacity of its battery packs
  • 90D/P90D – ~85.8 kWh total capacity, 81.8 kWh usable
So 9 kWh is about 11% of your usable capacity

It takes really long time to charge to exact 100% and the display may show 100% once you reach 99.x%. That may explain the remaining 1% due to round off


How about typical range vs used range. Say you charge to 100%, and it says 360KM but you drive 30KM at 220kwh/km, the 360KM range is a calculated using an expected usage of ~220kwh/km. So after driving 30km, you should expect to see that you have 330km of range left. I am seeing more like 325km left.

On the S, the typical range is calculated using ~200kwh/km, and if i do drive at 200kwh/km, then i see that the typical range matches my usage. Not the case with the X.
 

FequalsMA

Member
Mar 10, 2016
282
75
Hong Kong
How about typical range vs used range. Say you charge to 100%, and it says 360KM but you drive 30KM at 220kwh/km, the 360KM range is a calculated using an expected usage of ~220kwh/km. So after driving 30km, you should expect to see that you have 330km of range left. I am seeing more like 325km left.

On the S, the typical range is calculated using ~200kwh/km, and if i do drive at 200kwh/km, then i see that the typical range matches my usage. Not the case with the X.

Possible the X is erring on the super conservative side to prevent anyone from getting stranded?
 

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