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Model X New Rear Tires Need Replacement After Only 7,000 Miles

Justincase21

New Member
Jul 15, 2021
3
0
Michigan
I had tires replaced by Tesla Service Center at just past 30,000 miles. After 7,000 miles on the new tires, I brought it to the service center this week to address shutter issue (half shaft replacement covered under warranty) but was told I again need new rear tires due to excessive wear on inner walls. Service Center advised that I should have had an alignment when tires were replaced and even though tires were ordered & replace at the service center, I’m again responsible for cost of new tires after only 7,000 miles. Anyone had similar situation and any advice on how to challenge the service center claim that I’m already responsible for costs of new tires again?
 

RedXowner

Member
Mar 24, 2020
214
104
Springfield, Virginia
I guess it is possible (not saying this is the case) that when you got your new tires, you did not need an alignment (you got 30K miles off the original set). But a few days after receiving the new tires, something happened to throw the alignment off, and from that moment until now (7000 miles), your tires were experiencing excessive wear due to the bad alignment, hence the SC would not have been able to help when you got your new tires. Again, not saying this is true, but I guess it is one of the possible causes of the extremely short time for needing new rear tires.
 

mxnym

Member
Mar 9, 2018
991
369
Bloomington, IN
If it were truly an alignment issue, they should have noticed and suggested an alignment during the replacement of the tires.
As far as I know, checking alignment requires connecting everything that alignment requires. For this reason, my service center doesn't offer a free alignment check, if you want it checked, you're paying for the alignment whether you need it or not. I'm not sure how they should notice misalignment when they don't check for it...
 

ngng

Active Member
Jul 23, 2018
1,000
476
Bay Area
As far as I know, checking alignment requires connecting everything that alignment requires. For this reason, my service center doesn't offer a free alignment check, if you want it checked, you're paying for the alignment whether you need it or not. I'm not sure how they should notice misalignment when they don't check for it...

correct. even with the new, fancy machines you need to hook up equipment. no such thing as a "free alignment" sometimes you can eyeball a bad alignment, but i doubt a SC would do it for you
 

mxnym

Member
Mar 9, 2018
991
369
Bloomington, IN
My confusion is if the car was really out of alignment wouldn't the 30K miles have shown that?!? That's the disconnect I'm having in this thread.
I've had my Model X aligned twice as often as any other vehicle I've owned and it still chews through the tires, but I wouldn't ever expect to get 30K miles in one set. OP could have purchased X used on a not-first set of tires and not known it or some impactful driving event could have knocked alignment out toward end of 30K miles / beginning of 7K miles. 7K miles is super low regardless, but wear on the inner tread only is incredibly unlikely to be a tire defect, especially in the X where camber is fixed at an oft-too-aggressive level (it's definitely not consistent from one vehicle to the next) and driving in low is the default due to the shudder issue.
 
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[email protected]

Supporting Member
Supporting Member
Sep 30, 2014
82
183
United States
I am getting a little over 25K miles per set of rear tires (fronts go twice as long as rears, so changed them at 50K) There is a lot of negative camber; the car weighs a lot; and the power is immense. I doubt it has anything to do with alignment (the negative camber is by design...) Nexen N Feras at Walmart are my choice.
 

Richbot

Member
Oct 16, 2020
452
364
STL
If the
I am getting a little over 25K miles per set of rear tires (fronts go twice as long as rears, so changed them at 50K) There is a lot of negative camber; the car weighs a lot; and the power is immense. I doubt it has anything to do with alignment (the negative camber is by design...) Nexen N Feras at Walmart are my choice.
Agreed. If it's tracking straight and you're not getting excessive consumption, it's a 450+hp 5400lb vehicle with staggered tires and negative camber-heavy geometry for its normal operating range (which is a good thing! we want the car to handle as well as it can, right?) and a fairly soft factory tire spec.

It's not a Highlander. OP's service center probably measured the wrong car and called the wrong owner or something, lol
 

jboy210

Supporting Member
Supporting Member
Dec 2, 2016
5,379
3,332
Northern California
I had tires replaced by Tesla Service Center at just past 30,000 miles. After 7,000 miles on the new tires, I brought it to the service center this week to address shutter issue (half shaft replacement covered under warranty) but was told I again need new rear tires due to excessive wear on inner walls. Service Center advised that I should have had an alignment when tires were replaced and even though tires were ordered & replace at the service center, I’m again responsible for cost of new tires after only 7,000 miles. Anyone had similar situation and any advice on how to challenge the service center claim that I’m already responsible for costs of new tires again?
Have you looked at the tires? Are they really worn out? If so, post a picture.
 

RedXowner

Member
Mar 24, 2020
214
104
Springfield, Virginia
I bought my MX with 47K on it, and I am still using that same set of tires that came with it and am now at 62K (I have put 15K on these tires so far). Tires do not show excessive wear. I've towed my boat with my MX using these tires probably about 300-400 miles so far. Just a data point.
 

ngng

Active Member
Jul 23, 2018
1,000
476
Bay Area
My confusion is if the car was really out of alignment wouldn't the 30K miles have shown that?!? That's the disconnect I'm having in this thread.

yeah, on paper. the simple answer here is the alignment changed either towards the end of the first set of tires, or, the new ones.
 

Richbot

Member
Oct 16, 2020
452
364
STL
this is false. and, a waste of money. tires don't change your alignment.

Yep. File this nonsense with the 3,000 mile oil change.

Lots of reasons to align a Tesla but "new tires" isn't one of them. "Random bits might have fallen off sometime recently" is a valid reason, but you should look under the car more often than every tire change lol. "Factory aligned it wrong" is another one, but that should show up in the consumption numbers vs others with similar cars...so, yeah. I dunno maybe I'm leaning toward go ahead and get it aligned now that I'm talking through it heh. "Autopilot went ahead and drove the car over a huge chuckhole" is the one I would be most suspicious of on a Michigan car...
 
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ngng

Active Member
Jul 23, 2018
1,000
476
Bay Area
Yep. File this nonsense with the 3,000 mile oil change.

Lots of reasons to align a Tesla but "new tires" isn't one of them. "Random bits might have fallen off sometime recently" is a valid reason, but you should look under the car more often than every tire change lol. "Factory aligned it wrong" is another one, but that should show up in the consumption numbers vs others with similar cars...so, yeah. I dunno maybe I'm leaning toward go ahead and get it aligned now that I'm talking through it heh. "Autopilot went ahead and drove the car over a huge chuckhole" is the one I would be most suspicious of on a Michigan car...

I heard in passing that Tesla doesn't align cars from the factory. This wouldn't surprise me, but I don't know how true it is. Maybe I can find somebody locally with a newish car and check their alignment.
 

RedXowner

Member
Mar 24, 2020
214
104
Springfield, Virginia
yeah, on paper. the simple answer here is the alignment changed either towards the end of the first set of tires, or, the new ones.

The concept of getting an alignment done when new tires are installed is not a bad one. Let's say in your example above, there was trauma to the car that caused an alignment issue, and this trauma occurred right before the tires were changed. User got 30K miles on the old set of tires and assumes the alignment is "good," so user doesn't get an alignment done. But in this case, alignment is out due to the trauma just experienced. User drives 7000 miles with new tires on a bad alignment and now needs new tires because of the bad alignment. Could have prevented the need for new tires after 7000 miles if user had gotten an alignment done at time of changing tires.
 

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