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Model X Regeneration not linear

Discussion in 'Model X: Driving Dynamics' started by bikeandsail, Sep 21, 2016.

  1. bikeandsail

    bikeandsail Member

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    Please look at this 11 second poor quality video I made of my Model X as I fully back off on the accelerator and get full regeneration.

    Notice is starts at about -50kw and then as it smoothly approaches -25kw it takes a small jump in the opposite direction and then resumes it's progress to zero.

    Do other folks Model X's do this? Just seems kind of strange. Do Model S's do the same thing?

    Ron


     
  2. docBliny

    docBliny Member

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    I noticed the regen isn't linear during my test drive simply from the way the car behaves (how fast it brakes). At first I thought the regen on the X was less aggressive than on our Kia Soul EV, but I think it's simply the way it does it to give you a smoother experience.

    //TB
     
  3. brucet999

    brucet999 Active Member

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    After reading your post, I was doing some errands and watched regen rate on the energy meter of my MS 70. Sure enough, it started at a bout 50 kW, smoothly and gradually decreased to about 25 kW, when it took a little jump and then decreased smoothly again. I tried it three times with same results.

    I wonder if the firmware increases regen at that point in order to maximize braking power at slower shaft rpms?
     
  4. bikeandsail

    bikeandsail Member

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    Thanks Blue Max,

    I am not sure why Tesla would want to do it but at least I now know it must be normal since your Model S also does it.
     
  5. vandacca

    vandacca ReActive Member

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    It's possible that they couldn't find one algorithm to handle the complete range of speeds smoothly, so they took 2 different algorithms (one high speed, one low speed) and the point at which they switch over is where you see that little bump. Totally guessing here, but it seems plausible to me.
     

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