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Model Y Brake Service

I am looking at doing the recommended brake service on the MY, there are a few decent videos for the M3 but nothing on the Y. I saw that the brakes are bigger and expect that the procedure might be slightly different. Has anyone gone through the steps and has a reference (perhaps from the service manual)? I would like to follow the correct torque spec if it's different. Any other changes or gotchas on the Y or should I just follow the M3 videos for reference?
 
It appears that the front brake calipers for the LR MY are similar to the performance model 3's, as in this video:

Does locktite need to be used on the caliper slide pins when they are screwed back into the caliper, as seen in this video? I have only serviced pads on Brembo brakes with caliper slide pins that did not need to be torqued.

Also, the torque specs in this video are 140 nm for the caliper bolts (20 mm star bolts), and the caliper sliding pins are 25 nm.
 
That video is really bad. First off, the front rotors do not move/slide as he says. The front brakes are a 4 piston design which is basically maintenance free. 4 pistons connected in series equalize the load between each other therefor equal pressure at all times on both sides. No maintenance really required on those except maybe using some brake cleaner to remove dust build up.

As for the rears, disassembly is a must once a year especially when used on salted roads. Most important part is the part he did not do, remove the rubber protection sleeve on the slider and remove the slider, clean the slider and hole and install new grease. Make sure you use brake/caliper grease, yes there is a difference!

As for loctite, debate-able, some manufacturers recommend, some don't. Whatever you do do not use red loctite, this is permanent stuff, blue is removable and the one you should use if you decide to do so.

I do mine this time of year when I swap from winter tires to summer tires.
 
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That video is really bad. First off, the front rotors do not move/slide as he says. The front brakes are a 4 piston design which is basically maintenance free. 4 pistons connected in series equalize the load between each other therefor equal pressure at all times on both sides. No maintenance really required on those except maybe using some brake cleaner to remove dust build up.

As for the rears, disassembly is a must once a year especially when used on salted roads. Most important part is the part he did not do, remove the rubber protection sleeve on the slider and remove the slider, clean the slider and hole and install new grease.
This video shows that the front calipers are being serviced, the only difference is that the caliper slide pins are not the same on the model y.

I was always told to use silicone paste to lubricate the slide pins in the rubber boot on the rears.

Any idea what the torque specs are for the caliper bolts and the slide pins on the front caliper?

Thanks
 
That video is really bad. First off, the front rotors do not move/slide as he says. The front brakes are a 4 piston design which is basically maintenance free. 4 pistons connected in series equalize the load between each other therefor equal pressure at all times on both sides. No maintenance really required on those except maybe using some brake cleaner to remove dust build up.

As for the rears, disassembly is a must once a year especially when used on salted roads. Most important part is the part he did not do, remove the rubber protection sleeve on the slider and remove the slider, clean the slider and hole and install new grease. Make sure you use brake/caliper grease, yes there is a difference!

As for loctite, debate-able, some manufacturers recommend, some don't. Whatever you do do not use red loctite, this is permanent stuff, blue is removable and the one you should use if you decide to do so.

I do mine this time of year when I swap from winter tires to summer tires.
Thanks for the details. You’re saying I should leave the front alone and only disassemble the rear?
 
Correct, Only the the rear sliders need to be serviced meaning removed, cleaned and lubricated with caliper grease. Some brake cleaner on both front a rear to remove some of the almost non existant brake dust won't hurt either. Remember, the brakes are supposed to last 300,000km if one pedal driving is used most of the time so not much brake dust happening. The service is more for lubrication of the sliders than anything else. The hardware holding the pads in place is stainless so no corrosion going on there. The pins holding the front pads in place are simply there so they do not fall out, no precision holes or smooth mating surfaces that need attention like the rear sliders.
 
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