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Model Y comfort vs...Honda CR-V

Johnny Vector

Member
Jun 21, 2020
297
490
Maryland
The Y absolutely rides harsher than the 3 (if you can believe that).
Tesla has also removed the regen strength setting in new production MY’s. So anyone who would get motion sick on account of regenerative brakeing is surely going to feel it more.

On the plus side, the rear passenger room in the Y is a substantial upgrade from the 3. And the seats partially recline.
Anyone who gets motion sickness from the regenerative braking just needs to teach their driver how to operate a one-pedal car. Seriously, takes about a day of paying attention to controlling the speed with your foot, and you're good. If you continue to lift your foot all the way and expect it to act like an ICE, well, I don't know what to tell you, other than don't do that.
 

Johnny Vector

Member
Jun 21, 2020
297
490
Maryland
I don't think it's ride stiffness that creates nausea in a backseat. Getting jerked and bounced around isn't typically a nausea enduing motion. Very likely it has more to do with the closeness of the surroundings (seat, doors, ceiling). A more open area would likely help.

The Honda CR-V is a fantastic car. I think you should also test drive a Model Y with people in the backseat.
Agree. It's very odd to me that people talk about a stiff suspension making it worse. The only cars I've ever gotten motion sick in were the big sloppy Buicks from the 70s where the goal was to make the suspension as soft as humanly possible.

And Boeing claims that 787s reduce the incidence of airsickness by a factor of 8, and you can feel that what they've done is shaped all the motion up to the higher frequencies (i.e. made the "suspension" stiffer).

So anyway, I suspect the problem is somewhere other than suspension stiffness.
 

Exelion

Member
Feb 21, 2021
289
390
Los Angeles, CA
Model 3 and Model Y's have very similar suspensions systems: very stiff springs with very slow moving shocks. From what I know of personally driving (and owning the Y) I can tell you everyone is correct in that the Y is much stiffer and harsher than the 3. I highly doubt Tesla is going to improve and change the suspension. While people have said they already did, I have not seen any evidence of different spring/shock numbers on the car. (I want to be wrong on this.)

Of all the things Tesla did right with the powerful motors, long-range batteries, and computer interface, one of the things that lost development $$$ was unfortunately the suspension pieces, which went the way of performance > comfort. To get both, then more $$$ has to be spent (on the customer's part)

The advice of lowering the tire pressure to 38 PSi or going with 19" (which most people have already), doesn't help much with the ride, and brings in the additional burden of a slightly reduced range.

If you want to have a much softer ride, than do what many have done (which is spend even more $$$, about $3000 worth) and get coilovers like the one in the pic below. As you can see, the spring is thinner and progressive (softer). The shocks, while also made better, are adjustable and have advanced valves in them. You might notice the springs are also shorter - it's made up for by the fact that there's adjustable spacers that go there making the overall length the same. This particular system (by Mountain Pass Performance) is truly a world of difference in suspension. I don't think there's anyone out there who has them and says they're not great-they are. This part bears repeating-The suspension pieces in MPP's KW kit are the one that 3's and Y's should've had from day one, if at least the performance models. Even if they had nonadjustable height, and fewer clicks of rebound/compression, it would still be a massive improvement over what they have now.

0539DA3F-BD5D-4E1A-AB19-BC3FE56FB9E1.jpeg


I'll admit, I was happy with everything else, and a little peaved by having to spend so much more on top of an expensive car, but the end result was a car I enjoyed driving in addition to all the other good stuff. Good luck with your decisions.
 
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yhooo

Member
Jul 28, 2020
5
24
New Jersey
I have both MY Long Range and CR-V. Both are great cars. We have taken long drives in both with people in the back and no complaints with either car. As most people have mentioned you will feel the bumps more on harsh roads in the MY, the CR-v does a better job of softening the bumps. on normal roads the car motion is well controlled with both cars, the CR-V floats a little more. The MYLR obviously handles better and is more fun to drive….they are different cars
 
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ps83v18

EVentuallyEVeryV
Mar 12, 2021
215
250
Mississippi
We had a 2012 CR-V (bought it new) and put 275,000 miles on it. Lots and lots of rural driving and road trips. Upgraded to MY 2 months ago. I suppose the Y is a little harsher on bumpy roads (maybe), BUT it is far smoother on well-paved roads. The CR-V was very comfortable, but the Y is much more so. Better seats, and surprisingly roomier inside (both front and back). A little less cargo space (but I’m not counting the frunk).

No regrets, absolutely love it, not looking back at all. Model 3 is definitely too small and “cozy” for us though.

Loved the CR-V, love the Y more.
 
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qdeathstar

Completely Serious
May 17, 2019
4,029
4,298
VB
I think if you want performance model y, it is comfortable but a little bit of an afterthought l. I think your going to need to step up to x or s for comfort... crv is a every day car, comfort was probably a primary or secondary consideration..

But you do need to to use those horrible dirty smelly gas stations...

Up to you.
 
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I think if you want performance model y, it is comfortable but a little bit of an afterthought l. I think your going to need to step up to x or a for comfort... crv is a every day car, comfort was probably a primary or secondary consideration..

But you do need to to use those horrible dirty smelly gas stations...

Up to you.
I don't mind the gas stations. Don't smell nearly as bad as the moldy air coming out of my model 3 AC. And I've already changed the filters a few months ago.
 

Doc_Holliday

Member
Jul 23, 2021
356
208
Oregon
Test drive a MY performance today and ended up ordering. The ride felt great to me and I purposely drove over some shitty roads. Don’t have a CRV but have. 2019 HRV and I think the Y was more comfortable. Biggest plus was how much less road noise there was too. The HRV road noise is terrible.
 
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Test drive a MY performance today and ended up ordering. The ride felt great to me and I purposely drove over some shitty roads. Don’t have a CRV but have. 2019 HRV and I think the Y was more comfortable. Biggest plus was how much less road noise there was too. The HRV road noise is terrible.
That's great feedback! Was anyone sitting in the rear seats? I noticed no one ever complained about the ride in the front with my M3 either.
 
@dannydan, I have 50+ years experience with motion sickness. I agree with previous posts that ride stiffness isn’t really the source of the problem. THE number one thing is for the passenger to be able to adequately see out the window and not be focusing on something within the car. I don’t know how old your kids are, but I do know how low the model 3 back seats are. I would guess that is the biggest problem with the model 3.

Tangent - model X isn’t great for back seat passengers with motion sickness issues. Can’t see over seats in front limiting passenger’s ability to look forward and see out.

I was intrigued by your desire to get a CR-V after owning a Tesla. I was in need of an ICE after owning a Tesla, and was quite sure the CR-V would be it (previously had a Honda Odyssey for 12 years). 2 minutes into the CR-V test drive it was off the list. Like you, I am not an aggressive driver, but I found the CR-V so overwhelmingly underwhelming in it’s power. I want to merge into highway traffic without effort and don’t think I would have been happy with the CR-V. As a side, we ended up with a Volvo XC40 instead, and it’s met our ICE needs. I wouldn’t recommend it for a family if 4, tho. Too small.

I do not own a model Y but am a huge fan of them. Have test driven one and had some as loaners at service appointments. Love the glass roof. It was much quieter than our model 3. The higher elevation is always nice. Great hatchback and lots of room - more than the CR-V, I think? (I’ve not looked at specs.)
 
@dannydan, I have 50+ years experience with motion sickness. I agree with previous posts that ride stiffness isn’t really the source of the problem. THE number one thing is for the passenger to be able to adequately see out the window and not be focusing on something within the car. I don’t know how old your kids are, but I do know how low the model 3 back seats are. I would guess that is the biggest problem with the model 3.

Tangent - model X isn’t great for back seat passengers with motion sickness issues. Can’t see over seats in front limiting passenger’s ability to look forward and see out.

I was intrigued by your desire to get a CR-V after owning a Tesla. I was in need of an ICE after owning a Tesla, and was quite sure the CR-V would be it (previously had a Honda Odyssey for 12 years). 2 minutes into the CR-V test drive it was off the list. Like you, I am not an aggressive driver, but I found the CR-V so overwhelmingly underwhelming in it’s power. I want to merge into highway traffic without effort and don’t think I would have been happy with the CR-V. As a side, we ended up with a Volvo XC40 instead, and it’s met our ICE needs. I wouldn’t recommend it for a family if 4, tho. Too small.

I do not own a model Y but am a huge fan of them. Have test driven one and had some as loaners at service appointments. Love the glass roof. It was much quieter than our model 3. The higher elevation is always nice. Great hatchback and lots of room - more than the CR-V, I think? (I’ve not looked at specs.)
Wow, this was exactly the discussion I was hoping to have. I did not test drive a cr-v, yet, but I was planning on getting the hybrid version which has slightly more power. I think perhaps it wasn't clear from my original post, but as a driver I love the M3. Comfortable, powerful, fun to drive, awesome tech. It's once you get into the back seats that things get ugly...
My son and wife (she sits in the back next to him) absolutely hate riding in the car, and I can't selfishly justify keeping it because it's fun for me to drive. I tried switching places with her on several occasions, I got a migraine and nausea within 10-15 minutes.

It sounds like you think the Y is a better vehicle for folks with motion sickness? That's actually very reassuring, coming from someone with a history of motion sickness.

Btw, one last note - the cr-v was more of an example for an ICE in the compact SUV category. Rav4, CX-5 and the likes are all potential contenders.
 

kenadams

Member
Jul 31, 2020
94
25
DFW
We own a 2017 CRV and a 2020 MY. The MY has the stiffest ride and it is very annoying on bad roads. On highways, the ride is comfortable in the Y. CRV has softer suspension and thus leans more at corners and makes you reduce your speed. MY wins on the handling front. CRV's suspension is not as good as the German luxury brands, but you will feel fewer road imperfections inside the cabin due to the softer setup.

If you are comparing only the rear seat comfort, I will have to say that the CRV will be better.
 
We own a 2017 CRV and a 2020 MY. The MY has the stiffest ride and it is very annoying on bad roads. On highways, the ride is comfortable in the Y. CRV has softer suspension and thus leans more at corners and makes you reduce your speed. MY wins on the handling front. CRV's suspension is not as good as the German luxury brands, but you will feel fewer road imperfections inside the cabin due to the softer setup.
Which do you guys prefer taking on longer rides?
 

kenadams

Member
Jul 31, 2020
94
25
DFW
Which do you guys prefer taking on longer rides?
The Y is always preferred as it is more fun to drive. However, we haven't done any real long drives after getting the Y due to COVID. We may still take the CRV for long trips if the charging situation is not so certain. My wife while riding in the back seat of the Y had complained about the stiffer ride. I had felt it too though it was only a short ride. The middle seat (Model Y) is the worst.

I recommend you to take a test drive and get the feel yourself. When I did the contactless test drive last year, they allowed me to take the car home and have a longer test drive. I am not sure whether they still do it, but it won't hurt to ask.
 
The Y is always preferred as it is more fun to drive. However, we haven't done any real long drives after getting the Y due to COVID. We may still take the CRV for long trips if the charging situation is not so certain. My wife while riding in the back seat of the Y had complained about the stiffer ride. I had felt it too though it was only a short ride. The middle seat (Model Y) is the worst.

I recommend you to take a test drive and get the feel yourself. When I did the contactless test drive last year, they allowed me to take the car home and have a longer test drive. I am not sure whether they still do it, but it won't hurt to ask.
I did test drive the Y. Definitely stiff, though much like the 3, felt more in the back. The question, as others have brought up here, is whether it is the root cause of motion sickness.
Bottom line - would you recommend it as a primary vehicle? Assuming you don't have the crv as a backup?
 

avs007

Member
May 14, 2021
596
460
PacNW
It sounds like you think the Y is a better vehicle for folks with motion sickness? That's actually very reassuring, coming from someone with a history of motion sickness.

Btw, one last note - the cr-v was more of an example for an ICE in the compact SUV category. Rav4, CX-5 and the likes are all potential contenders.
I just took my mother in law on a 3 hour road trip in our Y. She didn't complain about motion sickness (she was sitting in the back), and she's usually always getting motion sickness... I had to give her Dramamine before in the past.
 

Johnny Vector

Member
Jun 21, 2020
297
490
Maryland
One thing that is worth considering: How long are you planning to keep the car? The bottom is going to fall out of the used ICEV market sometime around 2025 or 2026, as the supply of used fleet vehicles becomes entirely electric and EVs become obviously cheaper even to people who don't think about total cost of ownership. So when calculating the cost of getting an ICEV now, unless you're planning to sell within 2 or 3 years, don't count on getting anything for it.

If you're planning to drive it into the ground and thus aren't worried about resale value, be prepared for range anxiety, as gas stations start to go out of business for lack of business.
 

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