Welcome to Tesla Motors Club
Discuss Tesla's Model S, Model 3, Model X, Model Y, Cybertruck, Roadster and More.
Register

Model Y Performance In The Snow

frankvb

Supporting Member
Feb 29, 2020
838
517
San Diego, CA
First you don’t want the car to slow down. Now you say you actually had to slow down.

If you had to slow down, and the car couldn’t handle it, while the car in front of you could handle the same amount of deceleration without problems, then it is a clear sign that your tires were not as good as his.

So what would you have done in a car with no engine braking? You can’t avoid hitting the brakes, because then you will hit the car in front. You can’t brake either because we have just established that your tires are not up to it.

You have basically two options until you get better tires: Keep better distance to the cars in front. Or don’t drive.
I think your reasoning misses the fact that when using the brake all 4 wheels will slow down the car, but when using regen only the rear wheels do.
 
  • Informative
Reactions: srlawren

DaBagBoy

Member
Dec 3, 2018
37
25
Lansing, MI
Summer tires need to go for sure...but also check your tread depth, I received my M Y Performance in June, and couldn't believe how little tread was left after 10,800 miles they were showing the wear bars...so now I need new tires...just finding them is a giant pain as TireRack only has summer tires in the 275/35R21 and 255/35R21

I'd like to keep the wheels but would like to get some all season tires that don't seem to exist.....
 

noshadow

Member
Mar 18, 2020
433
255
Berkeley, CA
I think your reasoning misses the fact that when using the brake all 4 wheels will slow down the car, but when using regen only the rear wheels do.

woah is that true? I didn't realize regen is only the rear wheels.

In my previous (manual transmission, AWD) car, downshifting to engine brake would brake all four wheels
 

AllanO

Member
Nov 20, 2020
52
39
Denmark
I think your reasoning misses the fact that when using the brake all 4 wheels will slow down the car, but when using regen only the rear wheels do.

I think your reasoning misses the fact that the complaint, I replied to, was about the amount of regen - not about front/rear regen balancing.
 

geckopelli

New Member
Nov 11, 2020
1
2
Milky Way
2021 Model Y came with Continental ProContact RX tires that were terrible on Colorado snow. I was fishtailing all over the place without trying. Installed Continental ExtremeContact DWS06 tires that are superb... no unexpected loss of traction on snow/ice even while trying to spin the tires.

BC5FF488-0391-4283-9E55-4159CD4FC343.jpeg
 

eqskels

Member
Nov 9, 2020
8
5
Minnesota
Have PZero Winters. On a slick highway at 40-50 mph speeds, taking my foot off the accelerator caused an immediate slight fishtail that seemed to correct itself after a second. Not fun at highway speeds. Using the brake with light pressure resulted in better control. Using off road mode with rolling or creep mode instead of hard regen seems to help the most when city driving around in slippery conditions.

I am too coddled by one pedal driving, is it too much to expect the computer to handle all of this for me?
 
  • Like
Reactions: srlawren

Mungo

Member
Apr 18, 2018
11
2
Here
Question: Will a set of 245/45/19 tires and rims fit on my 2021 Tesla Y? Apologize in advance for my ignorance, but I am not a tire guy. Saw a used set off an S for sale.
 

jcanoe

Active Member
Oct 2, 2020
1,837
1,825
Maryland
Question: Will a set of 245/45/19 tires and rims fit on my 2021 Tesla Y? Apologize in advance for my ignorance, but I am not a tire guy. Saw a used set off an S for sale.
In short, no.

Tesla Model Y 19" wheel (comes with Gemini wheel cover)
  • Size: 19x9.5" Front & Rear
  • Offset: +45
  • PCD: 5X114.3
  • Center Bore: 64.1mm
Tesla Model S 19" wheel
  • Size: 19x8.5"
  • Offset: +35
  • Bolt Pattern (PCD): 5x120
  • Center Bore: 64.1
More here: The Tesla Model Y Wheel and Tire Guide. Complete Tesla Model Y Wheel Specs. - T Sportline - Tesla Model S, 3, X & Y Accessories

Be sure that any wheels you want to use meet the Tesla Model Y gross axle weight rating (GAWR) specifications: (Source: Tesla Model Y Owner's Manual, page 182.)

GAWR Front (all tires): 3005 lbs
GAWR Rear (19"): 3607 lbs (This is for 2 wheels, each 19" wheel must have a load rating of greater than 1804 lbs)
GAWR Rear (20"): 3307 lbs
GAWR Rear (21") 3505 lbs
 
  • Informative
Reactions: srlawren

Daks

Member
Oct 21, 2020
131
91
Anchorage, AK USA
I think your reasoning misses the fact that when using the brake all 4 wheels will slow down the car, but when using regen only the rear wheels do.

Question - Since all Y's are AWD (At the moment), all I can find on Tesla's forums is that all 4 wheels regen. Where are you seeing that only the rear regens? OR is it possible since the rear motor is bigger it can regen more then the front?

Note: Not professing I know the answer as I don't. But this concerns me as I have a lot of snow/ice covered roads to drive and some are steep.
 

jcanoe

Active Member
Oct 2, 2020
1,837
1,825
Maryland
Question - Since all Y's are AWD (At the moment), all I can find on Tesla's forums is that all 4 wheels regen. Where are you seeing that only the rear regens? OR is it possible since the rear motor is bigger it can regen more then the front?

Note: Not professing I know the answer as I don't. But this concerns me as I have a lot of snow/ice covered roads to drive and some are steep.
It's a good question. All I could find was a link to a Chinese video of a Dual Motor Model 3 that captured data that showed only the rear motor was providing regen.
 

Mungo

Member
Apr 18, 2018
11
2
Here
In short, no.

Tesla Model Y 19" wheel (comes with Gemini wheel cover)
  • Size: 19x9.5" Front & Rear
  • Offset: +45
  • PCD: 5X114.3
  • Center Bore: 64.1mm
Tesla Model S 19" wheel
  • Size: 19x8.5"
  • Offset: +35
  • Bolt Pattern (PCD): 5x120
  • Center Bore: 64.1
More here: The Tesla Model Y Wheel and Tire Guide. Complete Tesla Model Y Wheel Specs. - T Sportline - Tesla Model S, 3, X & Y Accessories

Be sure that any wheels you want to use meet the Tesla Model Y gross axle weight rating (GAWR) specifications: (Source: Tesla Model Y Owner's Manual, page 182.)

GAWR Front (all tires): 3005 lbs
GAWR Rear (19"): 3607 lbs (This is for 2 wheels, each 19" wheel must have a load rating of greater than 1804 lbs)
GAWR Rear (20"): 3307 lbs
GAWR Rear (21") 3505 lbs
Thanks very much for taking the time to respond. Appreciate it. Looks like I am going with the Pirelli Winter Sottozero 3s. Going to put them on the gemini rims and get a set of aftermarket rims for the summer tires. At that point will need to order the TMPSs.
 

jcanoe

Active Member
Oct 2, 2020
1,837
1,825
Maryland
Thanks very much for taking the time to respond. Appreciate it. Looks like I am going with the Pirelli Winter Sottozero 3s. Going to put them on the gemini rims and get a set of aftermarket rims for the summer tires. At that point will need to order the TMPSs.
In addition to TSportline check out the Martian MW03 wheels available in 18", 19" or 20" for the Model Y: Martian Wheels
 

MountainPass

Vendor
Mar 2, 2018
1,395
2,752
Toronto, Canada
The regen bias to the rear makes it really nice to basically adjust the brake bias in real-time when on the track to induce rotation, but when it is slick outside sometimes you don't want more rear bias. So far the Y has been pretty good in the snow, although at times you remember it is an almost 4500lb vehicle!
 

frankvb

Supporting Member
Feb 29, 2020
838
517
San Diego, CA
Question - Since all Y's are AWD (At the moment), all I can find on Tesla's forums is that all 4 wheels regen. Where are you seeing that only the rear regens? OR is it possible since the rear motor is bigger it can regen more then the front?
I was merely deducting from the multiple posts reporting fishtailing that was the case, as that would not happen if both front and rear wheels would regen at the same rate. But I did not take into account it could just be that there's simply much less (but not 0) regen on the front wheels as compared to the rear wheels.
 

masotime

Member
Sep 14, 2020
58
57
San Francisco
I was merely deducting from the multiple posts reporting fishtailing that was the case, as that would not happen if both front and rear wheels would regen at the same rate. But I did not take into account it could just be that there's simply much less (but not 0) regen on the front wheels as compared to the rear wheels.

The fishtailing doesn’t just happen on regen, it happens on acceleration as well. This was on brand new Continental VikingContact 7 dedicated snow tires. So far the only thing that seems to fix this rear wheel bias is to use off mode road.
 

guyrelax

Member
Apr 30, 2020
33
22
denver, co
First you don’t want the car to slow down. Now you say you actually had to slow down.

If you had to slow down, and the car couldn’t handle it, while the car in front of you could handle the same amount of deceleration without problems, then it is a clear sign that your tires were not as good as his.

So what would you have done in a car with no engine braking? You can’t avoid hitting the brakes, because then you will hit the car in front. You can’t brake either because we have just established that your tires are not up to it.

You have basically two options until you get better tires: Keep better distance to the cars in front. Or don’t drive.


Maybe your reading comprehension isn't that great. It doesn't matter because its clear you'll just twist things to make tesla infallible.. My original comment was actually about slowing down, and the subsequent fishtailing.. which never happened in any of my other awd cars with all seasons. And now, you fall back on the tires.. AGAIN, compared to other cars with the same tires, the model Y fishtails when letting off the pedal and not on snow mode.. That's it, end of story. The bottom line is the tesla fishtails in this scenario. There is no different way the car can be driven to avoid this when you are in a situation where you need to slow down. If you still don't understand, and it hurts too much to admit tesla is worse in some areas.. just remember eventually the software upgrade should fix it. And no other car can do that
 
Last edited:

adomanim

Member
Jan 5, 2020
31
3
annaba
I just received my new Model Y performance. I need to get some snow tires put on it ASAP but I don’t know anything about tires. I have heard some people change out the rims and everything when they move to snow tires but I was hoping to just be able to replace the tire.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

About Us

Formed in 2006, Tesla Motors Club (TMC) was the first independent online Tesla community. Today it remains the largest and most dynamic community of Tesla enthusiasts. Learn more.

Do you value your experience at TMC? Consider becoming a Supporting Member of Tesla Motors Club. As a thank you for your contribution, you'll get nearly no ads in the Community and Groups sections. Additional perks are available depending on the level of contribution. Please visit the Account Upgrades page for more details.


SUPPORT TMC
Top