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Model Y SR gone from options and LR dropped 1K?

jcanoe

Active Member
Oct 2, 2020
1,742
1,727
Maryland
I don't think that Tesla is concerned that the EPA estimated range of the Standard Range RWD Model Y is only 244 miles instead of 250 miles. The difference is ~2.5%. It's got to be something strategically important to Tesla.
 
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Wilber

Member
Oct 17, 2015
97
89
Mill Valley, CA
My wife is looking for her first EV after I bought an M3 LR-AWD, and was interested in the Standard Range Model Y. Prior to Tesla withdrawing the cheapest version of the car, we felt they offered a compelling reason NOT to look at the Ford Mach-E or the VW ID-4, both of which inhabit the same price class before tax incentives for small SUVs. Now that Tesla has essentially walked away from the sub-$50k market, they have created ample space for these competitors to take hold in the marketplace. This doesn't make sense to me.
I understand what you mean. With the Standard Range MY gone, there isnt any Tesla comparable to the basic model of the Mach E or the ID4. BUT, Tesla's goal is to sell every EV they make. They cant make an EV in every segment. For instance, they have nothing to compete with the current Nissan Leaf. Whatever Tesla plans to do, it must be to maximize sales and keep production lines as simple as possible. If it does that without making a direct competitor to MachE and ID4, then fine. With that said, it is possible Tesla will come back soon with an 'improved' Standard Range MY. So, if you want to buy a compact SUV now, and dont care about quick charging on trips, may as well get a Mach E or ID4.
 

blissdancer

Member
Jan 31, 2020
111
32
Salinas, CA
Just received this SMS from a Tesla CSR I've been working with for a month or so:

"I have urgent updates for you! We no longer offer the custom standard range RWD Model Y anymore and we can only offer what's left in our inventory and are only honoring orders for those who already placed their deposits."

When I asked if that meant a LR RWD MY could be imminent:

"No - they told us a month ago that they are definitely not making that version."


Wow When I called the San Jose sales room last week they still said they have no information on the LR-RWD. Where are you ib CA. I am so tired of all the nonsense that Tesla is spewing. They have no respect for us.
 

SM00CH

New Member
Feb 21, 2021
3
2
El Dorado Hills, CA
My wife is looking for her first EV after I bought an M3 LR-AWD, and was interested in the Standard Range Model Y. Prior to Tesla withdrawing the cheapest version of the car, we felt they offered a compelling reason NOT to look at the Ford Mach-E or the VW ID-4, both of which inhabit the same price class before tax incentives for small SUVs. Now that Tesla has essentially walked away from the sub-$50k market, they have created ample space for these competitors to take hold in the marketplace. This doesn't make sense to me.

This is what I don't understand either. I was seriously looking at the SR MY as my first EV and was planning on purchasing this year because it was a seriously compelling value for me, I do not drive ranges long enough that I would need more than the 244 offered, at least not often enough to cause headaches. I use my car to drive to/from work and around town / occasionally on trips that are 160 miles round trips at most. After getting rid of this option at this price it is opening the market for vehicles like the Mach-E or ID-4. I really hope they bring a version of the MY below the LR AWD to fruition at some point and I would definitely buy it, honestly I really hope they don't do the Partial Premium Interior like with the SR+ M3, I always looked at it as the price difference from the M3 to MY was for the extra cargo space and for the Premium Interior since the rest is just a M3. I don't know if I should bite the bullet early and try talking to a Sales Advisor now about ordering a SR MY they might have in inventory that fits my desired spec or is close to it, or if I should wait it out and see if they ever replace it with something else. Worst case scenario is they don't replace it and I'll hopefully end up spending the extra money to get a LR AWD MY, but if not then I might just have to go with a SR+ M3 but I would really really appreciate the space of the MY after being able to carry so much with my CR-V for so long. This really doesn't make sense to me removing such an affordable car that I felt would've been more popular but maybe Tesla thought desire wasn't as high as a combo of people trying to wait for the $7k credit and people waiting for the updated center consoles. Only time will tell, hopefully I can get my MY by the end of this year like I was planning.
 
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Automobilist

Member
Feb 18, 2021
58
50
Orange County, CA
Assuming there were no other manufacturing or market factors at play, I can see why Elon made the statements that he did about 244 miles of range...

Before my Model Y LR we had leased a couple of BMW i3s (in sequence, over the course of 5 - 6 years). The first had 80 miles rated EV range the second had an updated battery with 120 miles of range. Both had range extenders (essentially an onboard gas powered generator adding ~50 miles of range) as a very necessary safety net.

While ok for running errands, and strictly for around town use (which is all we wanted it for) 80 miles was very low and there were many times we ended up relying on the range extender to get us where we needed to go with that car. The 120 mile version of the same car actually made a very significant difference (even though it was only 40 miles extra) and over the course of that lease we very rarely would end up having to use the extender. It was sufficient for around town use, but still not practical for road trips, and while it could have worked for someone with a longer commute, it would have involved relying significantly on the range extender maybe on a daily basis, which would kind of turn it into more of a hybrid for that use case.

One of the things to consider is that with EVs there are multiple factors that can affect the actual range you get. On a car with higher total range this will not matter as much for the average user as they will have ample range to play with for day-to-day use. If a car has lower range, it starts to matter more.

244 miles is actually 220 miles when charged to 90% (max recommended daily level of charge). Additionally while I live in SoCal and have not had to deal with this personally, I understand that the ambient temperature can have a large effect on range with the range dropping significantly if the battery pack is extremely cold, and finally there is normal battery degradation over the course of several years. Adding these factors together, that 244 might become something more like 180 - 200 miles average real world range after 3 - 4 years of use.

While 200 miles is plenty for around town use, based on my own experience with the i3. It could start to become problematic if someone was actually banking on having the full 240 or even 220 miles of range available to them on a daily basis due to their commute.

Given Tesla is trying to sell the Model 3 and Y as direct competitors to mainstream ICE cars, for the average John/Jane Doe ICE driver who is trying their first EV, having a max of 244 miles of range could create scenarios where they end up feeling like they were duped into getting something which cannot meet their daily needs. If bad enough, the experience could be enough to turn them off of EVs for a long time (the opposite of what Tesla is going for).

This is not exclusive to Tesla, by marketing the MachE as a mainstream EV Ford will likely end up facing many of the same issues with lower range models.
 

fokap888

Member
Jan 25, 2021
49
26
San diego
Assuming there were no other manufacturing or market factors at play, I can see why Elon made the statements that he did about 244 miles of range...

Before my Model Y LR we had leased a couple of BMW i3s (in sequence, over the course of 5 - 6 years). The first had 80 miles rated EV range the second had an updated battery with 120 miles of range. Both had range extenders (essentially an onboard gas powered generator adding ~50 miles of range) as a very necessary safety net.

While ok for running errands, and strictly for around town use (which is all we wanted it for) 80 miles was very low and there were many times we ended up relying on the range extender to get us where we needed to go with that car. The 120 mile version of the same car actually made a very significant difference (even though it was only 40 miles extra) and over the course of that lease we very rarely would end up having to use the extender. It was sufficient for around town use, but still not practical for road trips, and while it could have worked for someone with a longer commute, it would have involved relying significantly on the range extender maybe on a daily basis, which would kind of turn it into more of a hybrid for that use case.

One of the things to consider is that with EVs there are multiple factors that can affect the actual range you get. On a car with higher total range this will not matter as much for the average user as they will have ample range to play with for day-to-day use. If a car has lower range, it starts to matter more.

244 miles is actually 220 miles when charged to 90% (max recommended daily level of charge). Additionally while I live in SoCal and have not had to deal with this personally, I understand that the ambient temperature can have a large effect on range with the range dropping significantly if the battery pack is extremely cold, and finally there is normal battery degradation over the course of several years. Adding these factors together, that 244 might become something more like 180 - 200 miles average real world range after 3 - 4 years of use.

While 200 miles is plenty for around town use, based on my own experience with the i3. It could start to become problematic if someone was actually banking on having the full 240 or even 220 miles of range available to them on a daily basis due to their commute.

Given Tesla is trying to sell the Model 3 and Y as direct competitors to mainstream ICE cars, for the average John/Jane Doe ICE driver who is trying their first EV, having a max of 244 miles of range could create scenarios where they end up feeling like they were duped into getting something which cannot meet their daily needs. If bad enough, the experience could be enough to turn them off of EVs for a long time (the opposite of what Tesla is going for).

This is not exclusive to Tesla, by marketing the MachE as a mainstream EV Ford will likely end up facing many of the same issues with lower range models.


daily needs are 10-50 miles per day.
Thats it.
And put $11000 incl tax in your pocket.
And of story.
If someone need more then 150 miles DAILY then buy LR.
But those people are only 10% of total drivers.

SR was selling like crazy and M3 sales were down almost instantly
 

jcanoe

Active Member
Oct 2, 2020
1,742
1,727
Maryland
If you still want to purchase a Standard Range RWD Model Y there are currently 89 SR MY in inventory the US. More here at EV-CPO.com
https://ev-cpo.com/hunter/

You will need to work with your local Tesla Sales Center or call Tesla to be matched to an inventory vehicle.
 
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bro1999

Active Member
Apr 26, 2016
1,947
1,903
Maryland
If you still want to purchase a Standard Range RWD Model Y there are currently 89 SR MY in inventory the US. More here at EV-CPO.com
https://ev-cpo.com/hunter/

You will need to work with your local Tesla Sales Center or call Tesla to be matched to an inventory vehicle.

Is that what Elon meant when he said SR Y's were still available "off the menu"? Just the inventory units that are floating out there?
 

Desantii

Member
Jun 2, 2019
52
9
Bel air
Another thing to consider is now the spread of LR to P is 12k....even adding the accel boost and 20" wheels its now an 8k spread....makes getting the P a little harder decision unless there is something else coming to the P (other than .5 quicker with the boost)
 

jcanoe

Active Member
Oct 2, 2020
1,742
1,727
Maryland
Is that what Elon meant when he said SR Y's were still available "off the menu"? Just the inventory units that are floating out there?
Probably. If you want a SR MY now is the time. Tesla will honor existing SR orders, some of those who are waiting for a specific SR configuration may decide to go with a different vehicle. In the future Tesla can decide to produce a limited number of SR MY to balance production.
 
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Singhman

Member
Jan 18, 2021
30
16
Vancouver
Assuming there were no other manufacturing or market factors at play, I can see why Elon made the statements that he did about 244 miles of range...

Before my Model Y LR we had leased a couple of BMW i3s (in sequence, over the course of 5 - 6 years). The first had 80 miles rated EV range the second had an updated battery with 120 miles of range. Both had range extenders (essentially an onboard gas powered generator adding ~50 miles of range) as a very necessary safety net.

While ok for running errands, and strictly for around town use (which is all we wanted it for) 80 miles was very low and there were many times we ended up relying on the range extender to get us where we needed to go with that car. The 120 mile version of the same car actually made a very significant difference (even though it was only 40 miles extra) and over the course of that lease we very rarely would end up having to use the extender. It was sufficient for around town use, but still not practical for road trips, and while it could have worked for someone with a longer commute, it would have involved relying significantly on the range extender maybe on a daily basis, which would kind of turn it into more of a hybrid for that use case.

One of the things to consider is that with EVs there are multiple factors that can affect the actual range you get. On a car with higher total range this will not matter as much for the average user as they will have ample range to play with for day-to-day use. If a car has lower range, it starts to matter more.

244 miles is actually 220 miles when charged to 90% (max recommended daily level of charge). Additionally while I live in SoCal and have not had to deal with this personally, I understand that the ambient temperature can have a large effect on range with the range dropping significantly if the battery pack is extremely cold, and finally there is normal battery degradation over the course of several years. Adding these factors together, that 244 might become something more like 180 - 200 miles average real world range after 3 - 4 years of use.

While 200 miles is plenty for around town use, based on my own experience with the i3. It could start to become problematic if someone was actually banking on having the full 240 or even 220 miles of range available to them on a daily basis due to their commute.

Given Tesla is trying to sell the Model 3 and Y as direct competitors to mainstream ICE cars, for the average John/Jane Doe ICE driver who is trying their first EV, having a max of 244 miles of range could create scenarios where they end up feeling like they were duped into getting something which cannot meet their daily needs. If bad enough, the experience could be enough to turn them off of EVs for a long time (the opposite of what Tesla is going for).

This is not exclusive to Tesla, by marketing the MachE as a mainstream EV Ford will likely end up facing many of the same issues with lower range models.

Are you sure that the Tesla range rating is based on charging to 90%? Where can I find this information?
 

PearlShark

Member
Oct 13, 2017
140
66
Canada
Ok, so you can't just call up a Tesla store and go "I'd like to order a SRY plz"

Yup I did this for a friend a day after SR cancellation. They had multiple units available that matched my request. Some were still on the way from the factory (so they were not delivery rejects).
As stock dwindles down, you will have fewer options. Maybe they are still going to make a few in batches, per latest Elon comments about off-menu orders.
 

JLOC

Member
Jun 10, 2020
82
39
Orange County, CA
Ok, so you can't just call up a Tesla store and go "I'd like to order a SRY plz"
Granted I placed my order on Monday (the day the ceo confirmed the sr could be ordered off-menu), the sales advisor I spoke with advised me she could not place a new order for a SR. Instead, I could only take delivery of what they had in inventory.
 

Automobilist

Member
Feb 18, 2021
58
50
Orange County, CA
Are you sure that the Tesla range rating is based on charging to 90%? Where can I find this information?

I'm not saying that it is. As far as I am aware Tesla's range rating is based on a 100% charge.

However, it is recommended that the car only be charged to up 90% most of the time both for battery health and also to avoid inconsistencies and inefficiencies with regen braking above 90%.

It's ok to periodically charge up to 100% if the total capacity is needed for a long trip, but it is not recommended for daily use as I understand it.

So if planning for long-term day-to-day use, and assuming you'd prefer not to push things by keeping a max charge of 90%. The LR would have a max of about 293 while the SR has a max around 220.

That being said I don't know how much you would actually be degrading a battery by going to 100%, particularly if not letting it sit at that level for very long.

If this is a concern, you may want to do your own research on this whole idea of daily charge level and optimizing the battery (there is a lot of analysis/speculation on the "optimum" daily charge level for the battery searching online). You may be ok with the predicted trade-offs based on your own driving and expectations of how long you'd want to keep the car.
 
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