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Model Y vs Mustang Mach E

Is the $7500 tax credit worth waiting months to get Mach E instead of Model Y?

  • Yes

    Votes: 27 16.3%
  • No

    Votes: 139 83.7%

  • Total voters
    166

Uncle Paul

Well-Known Member
Nov 1, 2013
6,256
6,778
Canyon Lake,CA
With the way Tesla is so quickly advancing technology in their Model Y, it has a good chance to be a far advanced car by the time the Machi gets released. Already Ford has quarantined their initial production for some unspecified "quality issue"

If you never intend to take your new EV for longer road trips, the Supercharger network will not factor into your decision, but if you will need to charge away from your home, it could also make your decision for you.

With the way Biden is talking, by the time you could take delivery of your Machi the EV Federal incentives might just be reinstated. Having Tesla building the car in the USA might also help it regain it's tax credits. Hard to justify paying credits to a foreign company, instead of supporting their local workforce.

Biggest issue for many, is that the Machi is Fords first volume produced EV. Nobody knows yet what type of mechanical/electrical issues that may surface after they get some on the road...no car is perfect, expecially first year ones.

You are asking for advice on a Tesla forum, so take advice here with a grain of salt.
 

gg_got_a_tesla

Model S: VIN 65513, Model 3: VIN 1913
Jan 29, 2010
6,533
769
Redwood Shores, CA
One word: Superchargers.

Having owned Teslas for 8 years now, and having lived with an e-Golf to tide us over till the Model 3, beyond all the other considerations around price, performance, etc., I’d say that a huge consideration that folks don’t usually think about up front when making the purchase decision is the massive Supercharger network (coupled with many many destination chargers as well) that Tesla has invested in. The network extends not only to inter-city highway stops but also to several city charging options in many major metro areas now.

You may think that you may not do much long distance travel or that you may do all your charging at home or at work but, trust me, you’d miss the flexibility and freedom in terms of charging options that you’d have with a Tesla.

I guess there will be investments made in the charging infrastructure by other manufacturers and/or the Govt, but, it’d surely take several years during which Tesla will continue to expand their charging network heavily.
 

pt19713

Member
Feb 5, 2020
881
1,055
Delaware
My Tesla has what, 60kW regen? My I-Pace is over 200 kW. It's like dropping a parachute at 100 mph. Ditto for the Porsche Taycan.

Even the Porsche needs big brakes when you must stop right now.
78.8 kWh max brake regen on the 2020 model Ys, and 2021 LR Y. The '21 MYP gets 82 kWh max brake regen.
 

origingalatic

Member
Jul 18, 2020
241
153
new york
maybe it doesn’t matter but to the OP it sounds like one of the factors when comparing each car could be that one is made in Mexico and one is made in US. You might not care but I am assuming it might carry some weight in the decision process.

For what it's worth, Audi Q5 for North America are made in Mexico if OP worries about "Made in Mexico" quality.....

What you should really worry about is buying a Ford, regardless where it's made.
 

pt19713

Member
Feb 5, 2020
881
1,055
Delaware
For what it's worth, Audi Q5 for North America are made in Mexico if OP worries about "Made in Mexico" quality.....

What you should really worry about is buying a Ford, regardless where it's made.
That being said, we just sold our '19 SQ5 and bought a '21 M3P. In 11k miles, that Audi was a piece of junk. Terrible quality. I warned my wife not to buy a German vehicle but she didn't listen.
 
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origingalatic

Member
Jul 18, 2020
241
153
new york
That being said, we just sold our '19 SQ5 and bought a '21 M3P. In 11k miles, that Audi was a piece of junk. Terrible quality. I warned my wife not to buy a German vehicle but she didn't listen.

My MB GLK is made in Germany, still running smooth after 10 years. I believe 2019 or 18 was the first year Mexico plant opened for Q5. No way in hell I would purchase a refresh model in a new plant.
 

stopcrazypp

Well-Known Member
Dec 8, 2007
10,027
4,959
One word: Superchargers.

Having owned Teslas for 8 years now, and having lived with an e-Golf to tide us over till the Model 3, beyond all the other considerations around price, performance, etc., I’d say that a huge consideration that folks don’t usually think about up front when making the purchase decision is the massive Supercharger network (coupled with many many destination chargers as well) that Tesla has invested in. The network extends not only to inter-city highway stops but also to several city charging options in many major metro areas now.

You may think that you may not do much long distance travel or that you may do all your charging at home or at work but, trust me, you’d miss the flexibility and freedom in terms of charging options that you’d have with a Tesla.

I guess there will be investments made in the charging infrastructure by other manufacturers and/or the Govt, but, it’d surely take several years during which Tesla will continue to expand their charging network heavily.
Yeah, the nightmare reviews of the EA network (which the Mach-E relies on) pretty much wrote off any non-Tesla for me for now. There's been a few Mach-E reviews where the EA network let the reviewer down. I've seen also e-tron reviews where people try EA and it's hugely unreliable and when it works, very clunky (the touch screen is so slow. and sometimes it rejects your membership).
 
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AvengerBB

Member
Aug 15, 2016
133
78
Cincinnati, OH
also, important (with any vehicle) to purchase based on your needs/requirements. For me and my needs, long range really isnt that much of a factor. 90% of my driving is around town (even during non pandemic times) and I havent taken a road trip longer than 180 miles each way, in about 6 years. I also have never towed and dont live in a rural area. So even the lowest range Tesla, is longer range than I need.

Some of the tests that show who can get across country the quickest, or who can go the longest range or who can get 0-60 in 2.3 seconds vs 3.5 seconds? Not really crucial to me and my needs.

But again...my needs are just mine. Others may have wholly different needs

When you've bought ICE cars in the past did you buy based on the size of the fuel tank or MPG? It's interesting that with EVs many focus on range vs efficiency now. You may not need the range but will be paying more to drive (not including other costs like insurance and maintenance).
 
Last edited:

2101Guy

Active Member
Jan 6, 2020
1,451
1,259
USA
When you've bought ICE cars in the past did you buy based on the size of the fuel tank or MPG? It's interesting that with EVs many focus on range vs efficiency now. You may not need the range but will be paying more to drive (not including other costs like insurance and maintenance).
to answer your question, no, range has never been a decision factor on my ICE vehicles. I've paid attention to MPG, but it's never swayed my decision one way or the other. While I hated the MPG my E55 AMG returned, the performance outweighed any aspect of low MPG.
 

origingalatic

Member
Jul 18, 2020
241
153
new york
When you've bought ICE cars in the past did you buy based on the size of the fuel tank or MPG? It's interesting that with EVs many focus on range vs efficiency now. You may not need the range but will be paying more to drive (not including other costs like insurance and maintenance).

I thought it's obvious that no one cares about size of tank in ICE because gas stations are more readily available and cars can refuel from empty to full in matter of minutes.

Range and efficiency are correlated anyways.
 

Puma2020

Member
Jun 16, 2020
386
376
New Hampshire, USA
The question you asked is difficult to answer. I agree with most of the posts.
You can get a 2021 Y (or 3) in a few weeks. The Supercharger network is top notch if you are traveling.
The range and efficiency values are better for Tesla but your needs will dictate whether that is important.
The Mach-E/EA network may be fine by the time you actually get the car.
You still have to deal with a car dealer. Plus, that also may provide you with a better service/repair center.
However, EVs are supposedly maintenance free (or significantly reduced).
One drawback to lack of oil changes is you have to supply your own windshield fluid now! :)

I waited for a while hoping for some choices. VW ID.4, PoleStar 2, Jag, Audi, Nissan, ...
Some were way too expensive. Some I didn't trust for various reasons. Some had a range limitation that would not work for my needs.
I am very happy with my choice of the Y.
Good luck with your choice.
May the force be with you.
 

pt19713

Member
Feb 5, 2020
881
1,055
Delaware
It's still too early to make a judgement on the MME but it's probably going to be a good alternative to the Model Y, especially for those that aren't anticipating longer trips. Personally, most of my "longer" drives aren't that far since almost everything is within 120-150 miles, so I can do a destination charge on a 15A wall charger over 2-3 days, or a quick charge on a level 2 charger to make it home.

The MME appears to have a much nicer suspension setup, which is a bonus for some people that are turned away by the poorly tuned shocks on the Y. Fit and finish quality seems to be much better and more consistent. I see people bashing the Ford service/dealership structure but if something does go wrong, will it take them 3-4 weeks to get a part? Probably not. Is it going to have paint so thin that you'll be scrambling to install PPF? Probably not. If you get a flat tire with a major puncture/blowout, will it take 3-4 days to get the tire size in stock? Probably not.

MME still has a ways to go with improving the efficiency. Will it ever catch up to the Y? Probably not, just due to pure physics. It's 400 lbs heavier and not as aerodynamic. Ford will hit the range targets with a much larger battery pack (88.8 kWh). At the end of the day, most consumers don't really care how big the pack is and the overall efficiency. They want a good, usable range, and the MME does offer a decent alternative to the Y. 250-280 miles of range is good for the vast majority of consumers. Don't forget, Ford is a global company and those consumers in smaller countries don't have to travel across large states in the US like Texas and California to get to certain destinations. 250-280 is more than enough for most.
 

El joe

Member
Jan 29, 2019
404
270
Bay Area, CA
I think people are vastly-underrating the SC network and it’s amazing benefit. As someone who owned a Bolt and had to make regular 200-mile round trips, having to rely on third-party charging networks like EA and EVGo was nerve-racking and oftentimes extremely disappointing. I’ve yet to have issues at a SC. Until Ford and other EV makers can make that as reliable for a road trip or even just long commutes, they’ll struggle to gain traction. That makes the Mach-E a no for me — for now, at least.
 
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