TMC is an independent, primarily volunteer organization that relies on ad revenue to cover its operating costs. Please consider whitelisting TMC on your ad blocker or making a Paypal contribution here: paypal.me/SupportTMC

Monitoring Power Consumption of Charging Outlet

Discussion in 'North America' started by Alligator, Sep 6, 2013.

  1. Alligator

    Alligator Member

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2013
    Messages:
    35
    Location:
    Lino Lakes, MN
    Has anyone figured out a way to monitor the power consumption of the charging outlet used for their car? I am aware of a number of energy monitors, but I would like to collect data specifically on how much power is consumed from that particular outlet, and at what time. I'm looking for an independent monitor that is not associated with the car.
     
  2. brianman

    brianman Burrito Founder

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2011
    Messages:
    15,487
    As part of my solar installation, I got one of these:
    eGauge Home Page

    It currently has 3 monitored inputs: whole house consumption, solar generation, and car charging consumption. I get red spikes (see the chart on the web page) every time the car charges.

    For "car charging consumption", it's associated with my 14-50R and my HPWC.
     
  3. swaltner

    swaltner Member

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2012
    Messages:
    495
    Location:
    Kansas, USA
    I've currently got a Ted 5000 system with three sensors from The Energy Detective (TED). These sensors get installed inside the breaker panel. This looks like a similar product to the eGauge product listed above. I added the 3rd sensor when I installed the EVSE a week ago to monitor power usage (and thus money spent) charging the Leaf. This will allow me to keep using my spreadsheets that I started 20 years ago to calculate cost/mile (includes depreciation, insurance, taxes, tags, maintenance, fuel) of every vehicle I've owned.
     
  4. Tesla 940

    Tesla 940 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2011
    Messages:
    254
    Location:
    Long Beach, CA & Taos, NM
    I would really love to hear what the actual Kwh per "projected range" really is. My Roadster provides me actual Kwh hours, which I understand is accurate, and I "lose" about 25% to conversion heat. By that I mean I get about 750 watt hours into the battery for every Kwh from the outlet. I've heard that Tesla claims about a 9% lose with the MS but I have not heard of any great improvements in charging conversion so I'm skeptical. Maybe the 9% is the lose using a DC to DC Supercharger?
     
  5. aaron.s

    aaron.s Member

    Joined:
    May 31, 2012
    Messages:
    995
  6. JohnQ

    JohnQ Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2012
    Messages:
    1,585
    Location:
    Redding, CT
    Aaron, was that a carefully selected set of browser tabs you're showing?
     
  7. aaron.s

    aaron.s Member

    Joined:
    May 31, 2012
    Messages:
    995
    John

    Nope! That's my constant static set of browser tabs :)

    My "Command Central"!

    Aaron
     
  8. Alligator

    Alligator Member

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2013
    Messages:
    35
    Location:
    Lino Lakes, MN
    I picked up an eGauge. It is a very nice product.
     
  9. JackA

    JackA Member

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2012
    Messages:
    306
    Location:
    Orondo, WA
    #9 JackA, Oct 1, 2013
    Last edited: Oct 1, 2013
    Plug-In North Central Washington selected the Efergy E2 Energy Monitor to track usage at our haL2 EVSE sites. It has very good transmission/reception range even with the transmitter mounted inside the ClipperCreek CS-90 EVSE unit. These are simple to install and the data is stored for download and analysis. Usual price is around $115 we have eight of them and have not experienced any issues as of this date. We do not use the Internet gateway because many of our installations are not near access points. We simply visit the sites every month and download the data to a netbook. For home use, one very useful feature is that you can connect the sensors to your main leads at the load center then carry the monitor around the house turning on specific devices and observe the load increase. We have used a much narrower approach because we only want to see what the EVSE use is.
     
  10. purlah

    purlah Member

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2013
    Messages:
    7
    Location:
    oakland, ca
    If you are much of a hacker type at all, I recommend getting the Brultech Green Eye Monitor, which gives you 32 channels of load monitoring in a nicely inexpensive and compact box. I installed one to monitor several solar inverters, two car chargers, PGE, and went ahead and hooked up just about everything else in my main panel while I was at it because the cost was so low. Nice easy open interface I have feeding data to MRTG at the moment, but there are a few options if you don't want to DIY either.

    Its about $320 for the 32 channel monitor without CTs, and $500 with CTs.

    GreenEye Monitor
    GreenEye Monitor - Brultech Store
     
  11. mknox

    mknox Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2012
    Messages:
    8,556
    Location:
    Toronto, ON
    I agree. If I didn't already have a 3 MTU TED unit, that is the direction I'd go.
     

Share This Page