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Montreal to Ogunquit

Discussion in 'Canada' started by Luc Nocente, Dec 5, 2014.

  1. Luc Nocente

    Luc Nocente Member

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    I'm looking for the quickest way to go from Montreal to Ogunquit this summer, any ideas? Has anybody given it a try?
    There doesn't seem to be any Superchargers along the way.
     
  2. PoweredByRain

    PoweredByRain Member

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    Hi Luc. There don't appear to be any Superchargers in the plan that will help with this trip. At all. See Supercharger | Tesla Motors and Superchargers

    Google says it's 505 km, which is definitely beyond range. You could make it close to that distance going slowly, but let's face it, you're going to have to charge somewhere along the way, and it's going to take a fair bit of time to do so.

    There are two places to look:
    1. Tesla Motors "Find us" page, which shows HPWC chargers at hotels and so on:
    Find Us | Tesla Motors
    2. Plugshare.
    PlugShare - EV Charging Station Map - Find a place to charge your car!

    It does not look easy. There's a ski resort which has Level 2 service, and there's a couple of Nissan dealerships, but otherwise it's an EV-unfriendly route. Maybe in a few months there will be more options. Before going, definitely phone the place you hope to charge it, as well as a backup charging location, to be sure that you're not going to be stuck in the wilderness. Go slowly if you want to go further.

    Good luck!
     
  3. agileone

    agileone CDN P#40

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  4. EdA

    EdA Model S P-2540

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    The base of Mt. Washington has an HPWC if you have that option. "Soon" Hooksett, NH will be active (definitely before the summer).
    Recharging in Maine is pretty easy with Nissan dealers and a few destination chargers.
     
  5. GSP

    GSP Member

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    Don't forget to check for RV parks with "50 Amp service." Call ahead to be sure you can charge.

    GSP
     
  6. agloutney

    agloutney Member

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    It's for next summer? You should be ok. There's a supercharger going in at Hooksett NH on I93. From there it will be an easy drive to Ogunquit and back to the supercharger. If you're really lucky the Burlington supercharger will be up.
     
  7. Luc Nocente

    Luc Nocente Member

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    Thanks for all the responses, I just noticed I wasn't getting my notices.
     
  8. Luc Nocente

    Luc Nocente Member

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    This is awesome, distance for me is 398 km, I assume this is do-able on a full charge with a 85KW Model S during summer with normal air conditioning? I'm only getting the car in March.

    - - - Updated - - -

    If I remember correctly the HPWC is only good if you have the dual charger option? Can the model S with supercharger take advantage of the HPWC with no dual charger?
     
  9. agloutney

    agloutney Member

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    Not sure, it's hilly there. I'm no range expert either, I'm actually picking up my car this afternoon!!! :-D
     
  10. Luc Nocente

    Luc Nocente Member

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    When is the supercharger scheduled for Burlington?

    - - - Updated - - -

    Lucky you!
     
  11. agloutney

    agloutney Member

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    Burlington=Soon ;-)
     
  12. PoweredByRain

    PoweredByRain Member

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    Yes, you should be able to go 398 km in summer with normal air conditioning. IF you keep the speed reasonable, and assuming there isn't also a significant net elevation gain.

    If you have one charger in the car then it can handle 40 A at whatever voltage is provided. Under load the AC voltage from public chargers is typically either 200 V or 230 V (nominally 208 V and 240 V). 40A * 200 V = 8000 W or 8 kW. Whether a Model S is enabled for Supercharger use or not has nothing at all to do with AC charging.

    Most public charging stations I've found have been 30 A @ 200 V, which is 6 kW. Charging at 6 kW is painful. It's 12 hours empty to full. Plan accordingly. :-(
     
  13. Luc Nocente

    Luc Nocente Member

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    So the single standard charger charges at 40 A, the dual charger at 80 A and the Tesla Supercharger is compatible with either?
     
  14. EdA

    EdA Model S P-2540

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    The supercharger bypasses the onboard charger(s) and uses 480V DC (instead of 240V AC).
     
  15. Luc Nocente

    Luc Nocente Member

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    Ok now I get it. You need a PhD to buy this car.
     
  16. Doug_G

    Doug_G Lead Moderator

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    That's possible but pushing things. With a brand-new Model S you will get something like 424 Rated km on a full range charge. If you drive not-too-fast, on fairly level ground, without high winds or rain, you can do that... but you'll really have to watch the power usage like a hawk, and slow down if your safety margin starts going down. Personally my minimum safety buffer is 30 km.
     
  17. PoweredByRain

    PoweredByRain Member

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    Think of it this way: the batteries require a certain voltage - direct current - to be applied to them in order to store charge. At a Supercharger, the device that controls that voltage and supplies the current is in a big white cabinet in an equipment enclosure behind fencing. The voltage across the wires you have plugged into the car is DC (typically 350 to 400V).

    When plugging into an AC source, the device that controls the DC voltage across the batteries is inside the car. The voltage across the wires you have plugged into the car is AC, i.e. alternating between positive and negative, passing through zero many times per second. (240 Volts AC is actually a sine wave that varies between +336 V and -336V; 240V is essentially the equivalent DC voltage - see "root mean square").

    Technically the device which controls the voltage across the batteries is the charger, which is why the device that you plug into with an AC source is properly called something else: an EVSE ("Electric vehicle Supply Equipment") - it isn't a charger, that part is in the car. But EVSE is a ridiculous acronym and not something you can say as a word, so it is not uncommon for these to be called "chargers". And thus confusion arises.

    EVSEs communicate with the car so the car knows the maximum current that can be provided. Thus, for example, an HPWC may report that it can provide 80A continuous. If your car's charger can only handle 40A, though, that's what you're going to get. Again, the charger in the car will control everything - the EVSE is basically a safety switch, a way of power being applied to the connection only after the connection is physically made and tested. This avoids the obvious danger of plugging and unplugging live sources, which is what you do in your house all the time. At higher powers and possibly being outdoors, having a live relatively high voltage connection would be unwise in the extreme. :)

    I have to say that I understand some basics about electricity but was still wary of plugging in my LEAF, even into 120V, back in the day. :) Nowadays I have no qualms about plugging a 120kW Supercharger cable into the car in the rain. There's a proven track record to these things. No power is applied unless everything is safe.
     

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