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Motion sickness?

ironspider

New Member
May 30, 2021
3
0
Los Angeles, CA, USA
Greetings all, I know there are a couple threads on this but I went to test drive a Model 3 today (I have never been in an EV before) and while the acceleration was unlike anything I've ever experienced (completely amazing) the regen braking was so discombobulating to me and nearly immediately gave me motion sickness. I tried my best to practice gently letting off the gas but it still was so foreign to me as a person that has only ever driven automatics. I am prone to motion sickness and I got it bad during this 30 minute test drive.

So I got home and researched it and many people said that switching Regen Braking from "Standard" to "Low" can really help. So I replied to my test drive thank you email by stating that I would like to test drive it again with it in Regen Low mode and the rep told me it is no longer an option on Tesla cars.

So, I'm curious if any of you are very prone to motion sickness and if you eventually adapted to it? I'm also worried that many posts I saw about the autopilot has a tendency to accelerate harder than a person would manually and brake harder than a person manually would (when you're following a car on the freeway for example) which, to me, means it would induce motion sickness in people like me that are prone to it.

Thoughts?
 

DeltaOne

Member
Mar 19, 2021
168
104
Mount Airy, MD
So I got home and researched it and many people said that switching Regen Braking from "Standard" to "Low" can really help. So I replied to my test drive thank you email by stating that I would like to test drive it again with it in Regen Low mode and the rep told me it is no longer an option on Tesla cars.

I believe the information the rep gave you is incorrect. I'm still learning lots about my Model 3 after two months of ownership, but I learned that there used to be three modes. Standard, low and off. Now there are two modes, standard and low.

I recently switched regen from standard to low while running some errands. The regen braking effect seemed to be about 50% of what standard was.

I'd suggest two things: going back for a second test drive and setting regen to low. And that you'll need more time than a short test drive to learn to feather the accelerator as you slow down to lessen the effect of regen.

Personally, I love "one pedal driving." When folks ask me about my Tesla I tell them I (almost) never use the brake pedal...and they're amazed!
 

YourNickName

Member
May 29, 2021
26
21
Western, NY
I experienced this a little as well, it gets better / you get used to it. Further, in day to day normal use you won't be as harsh as you were when you were just trying everything.
 

techmagnetic

Member
Sep 29, 2020
93
59
Boston
I have no regen option either - can't disable or turn it lower. BUT, Chill mode feels smoother overall, so I recommend you try that. I've had passengers in my Model Y that get carsick, so I feel for you here. Between the rough suspension, fast acceleration, hard pullback from regen braking, it's a recipe for that unfortunately.
 
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ArloDog

Member
Dec 31, 2020
20
6
Seabrook Island, SC
Greetings all, I know there are a couple threads on this but I went to test drive a Model 3 today (I have never been in an EV before) and while the acceleration was unlike anything I've ever experienced (completely amazing) the regen braking was so discombobulating to me and nearly immediately gave me motion sickness. I tried my best to practice gently letting off the gas but it still was so foreign to me as a person that has only ever driven automatics. I am prone to motion sickness and I got it bad during this 30 minute test drive.

So I got home and researched it and many people said that switching Regen Braking from "Standard" to "Low" can really help. So I replied to my test drive thank you email by stating that I would like to test drive it again with it in Regen Low mode and the rep told me it is no longer an option on Tesla cars.

So, I'm curious if any of you are very prone to motion sickness and if you eventually adapted to it? I'm also worried that many posts I saw about the autopilot has a tendency to accelerate harder than a person would manually and brake harder than a person manually would (when you're following a car on the freeway for example) which, to me, means it would induce motion sickness in people like me that are prone to it.

Thoughts?
Regen does take some getting used to, and setting it to Low will help. Also, you can change the type of Regen braking to Creep instead of Hold, which will feel much more like a standard ICE vehicle's braking (and you will need to use the brake pedal if you want the car to come to a complete standstill).
 
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jjrandorin

Moderator, Model 3, Tesla Energy Forums
Nov 28, 2018
10,840
12,568
Riverside Co. CA
I believe the information the rep gave you is incorrect. I'm still learning lots about my Model 3 after two months of ownership, but I learned that there used to be three modes. Standard, low and off. Now there are two modes, standard and low.

I recently switched regen from standard to low while running some errands. The regen braking effect seemed to be about 50% of what standard was.

I'd suggest two things: going back for a second test drive and setting regen to low. And that you'll need more time than a short test drive to learn to feather the accelerator as you slow down to lessen the effect of regen.

Personally, I love "one pedal driving." When folks ask me about my Tesla I tell them I (almost) never use the brake pedal...and they're amazed!

There has never been an "off" for regen in model 3s that I am aware of. There was "standard" and "Low" and in newer cars "low" was removed. there is no way I am aware of for an owner to selectively turn off regen braking. The CAR will turn it down when the battery is cold, but there is no setting to turn it off, and I have never seen or read of such a thing.
 
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DeltaOne

Member
Mar 19, 2021
168
104
Mount Airy, MD
There has never been an "off" for regen in model 3s that I am aware of. There was "standard" and "Low" and in newer cars "low" was removed. there is no way I am aware of for an owner to selectively turn off regen braking. The CAR will turn it down when the battery is cold, but there is no setting to turn it off, and I have never seen or read of such a thing.

You're right. I was working from memory...and I checked the Model 3 PDF on my computer. But I guess the PDF is wrong. Ah...just noticed...the PDF manual says "The regenerative braking setting is not available on all vehicles."

And the Creep, Roll and Hold settings don't have any effect until the vehicle is close to, or at, a complete stop.

Maybe the original poster should select a Tesla vehicle that does have the regenerative braking setting.
 

ironspider

New Member
May 30, 2021
3
0
Los Angeles, CA, USA
I watched a video on the Mach-e and it has an option to completely turn off "1-pedal drive" which I assume is part of Ford's whole "we're kinda making an electric car but designing it for people that will panic if there's not a huge physical volume knob on the touchscreen..." approach. But I would assume that this disables the regen function? Or at least is what "OFF" was to some Tesla vehicles with the OFF option in regen braking?

It's not that I don't want to embrace a totally new way of doing things (and I am still in shock of how fast the Model 3 accelerates even 24 hours later) it's just that my wife suffers from motion sickness as well and there's no way to tough it out if it's affecting you.

I'll try what you guys are suggesting in just doing some more test drives now that I'm aware of it and work on the feathering of the gas pedal and maybe try out Chill mode for the acceleration.
 

jjrandorin

Moderator, Model 3, Tesla Energy Forums
Nov 28, 2018
10,840
12,568
Riverside Co. CA
I watched a video on the Mach-e and it has an option to completely turn off "1-pedal drive" which I assume is part of Ford's whole "we're kinda making an electric car but designing it for people that will panic if there's not a huge physical volume knob on the touchscreen..." approach. But I would assume that this disables the regen function? Or at least is what "OFF" was to some Tesla vehicles with the OFF option in regen braking?

It's not that I don't want to embrace a totally new way of doing things (and I am still in shock of how fast the Model 3 accelerates even 24 hours later) it's just that my wife suffers from motion sickness as well and there's no way to tough it out if it's affecting you.

I'll try what you guys are suggesting in just doing some more test drives now that I'm aware of it and work on the feathering of the gas pedal and maybe try out Chill mode for the acceleration.

Note that, regen braking is not necessarily "1 pedal driving" on the model 3. If you want to turn that on, its a separate setting that has to be turned on. Without that on, regen brakes down to around 5 or so miles an hour but does not bring the car to a complete stop.

I dont use one pedal driving (for example) but I have my regen on standard.
 

Mash

Supporting Member
Supporting Member
Nov 10, 2019
993
777
Prague
I guarantee that you will get used to it. The reason that you have motion sickness is that your body used to prepare for coasting once you release gas pedal. And now it's not. And since regen is so smooth - it feels like you're going suddenly uphill. So your mind starts to question your orientation and that makes you dizzy. It will stop happening after maybe 10-20 hours of driving with regen and won't come back.
 
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raptor5244

Active Member
May 10, 2019
1,202
915
Florida
As others have mentioned, this is something you just get used to and then you wonder how you ever drove without it. True one pedal driving is possible if you learn to feather the accelerator and enable brake hold while sitting at the traffic lights. It really does reduce a lot of driving fatigue while in stop and go traffic.
 

Gasaraki

Active Member
Oct 21, 2019
2,088
1,449
Syracuse, NY
Greetings all, I know there are a couple threads on this but I went to test drive a Model 3 today (I have never been in an EV before) and while the acceleration was unlike anything I've ever experienced (completely amazing) the regen braking was so discombobulating to me and nearly immediately gave me motion sickness. I tried my best to practice gently letting off the gas but it still was so foreign to me as a person that has only ever driven automatics. I am prone to motion sickness and I got it bad during this 30 minute test drive.

So I got home and researched it and many people said that switching Regen Braking from "Standard" to "Low" can really help. So I replied to my test drive thank you email by stating that I would like to test drive it again with it in Regen Low mode and the rep told me it is no longer an option on Tesla cars.

So, I'm curious if any of you are very prone to motion sickness and if you eventually adapted to it? I'm also worried that many posts I saw about the autopilot has a tendency to accelerate harder than a person would manually and brake harder than a person manually would (when you're following a car on the freeway for example) which, to me, means it would induce motion sickness in people like me that are prone to it.

Thoughts?
I think Teslas would not be a good choice for you. Other EVs that allow you to lower regen or use blended systems and have slow acceleration would be better for you.
 

Ampre Sand

Member
Nov 18, 2016
83
55
Seattle
EVs, especially Teslas, present some novel sensations: that velvety smooth acceleration, lack of engine noise as a cue, and strong off-throttle regen. Tesla has especially mastered the slow speed stuff - there's generally no lurch at either start or stop. At first you'll find yourself over-controlling the throttle, and there are all these habits we've learned from "sloppy" automatic transmissions.

It takes just a few hours of driving to recalibrate your right foot. A few more days to shake off most of your old automatic habits where you'd just completely casually lift your foot off the gas pedal and coast (or worse, pulse on and off the pedal). A few weeks more to build some finesse so that the car is comfortable for your passengers as well.

I find Autopilot accelerates and brakes about average. For some people it will seem timid, and others aggressive. Depends on your own expectations.

I'm slightly prone to motion sickness, especially if I'm not the one in control of the vehicle (or sailboat or airplane). You probably already know this, but sometimes having some food in you (empty stomach / low blood sugar can make things worse), keeping your eyes out the window and on the horizon, fresh air blowing on your face, and deep breathing all can help. As a passenger, more than once I've had to ask my partner who is driving (or flying) to take it easier. That said, I also fly, and early on in my training, the pangs of motion sickness soon went away as I adapted to the very new sensations of flight.

Have you asked your Sales Advisor if it is possible to do an overnight test drive? That might give you a better indication if you will adapt to the new sensations. Alternatively, many areas have Teslas available for rent on Turo. Just be aware the adjustable Regen setting was removed at the end of 2020 on new 3/Ys. Chill mode can help, as can enabling Creep mode.

Also good to test drive EVs from other makes. While you'd give up the Tesla Supercharger network, if most of your driving is within the range of your home, that may not matter much. Most other EV brands default to emulating a sloppy automatic transmission, for better or worse.
 
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Huskyfan

Member
Nov 25, 2019
163
124
Seattle
I suffer from vertigo due to traumatic brain injuries in the army and the fire service. I get motion sick very easily. Just watching a video of a carnival ride can make me get nauseated. I’ve never gotten motion sick driving my Tesla, except when my symptoms are really, really bad and i can hardly walk or turn my head without feeling like I’m about to vomit.

You will get used to the car. Avoid sudden acceleration, turns, etc. Now the only concerns are my passengers who say the car makes them feel sick; especially on autopilot.
 
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