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Motor Trend: World Exclusive! 2012 Tesla Model S Test and Range Verification

Discussion in 'Model S: Battery & Charging' started by mcornwell, Aug 27, 2012.

  1. mcornwell

    mcornwell Active Member

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    #1 mcornwell, Aug 27, 2012
    Last edited: Aug 27, 2012
    World Exclusive! Tesla Model S Test and Range Verification - Motor Trend


    Highlights:

    "the car's 0-60-mph time was 3.9 seconds, and it ssshhhhhh-ed past the quarter-mile mark in 12.5 seconds at 110.9 mph,
    and it ssshhhhhh-ed past the quarter-mile mark in 12.5 seconds at 110.9 mph..."

    "And were we to have measured those 0-60 mph times from the first twitch of accelerator movement instead of after the standard 1-foot roll-out, the Model S would be already off and away while the gas cars were still reacting to their suddenly opened throttles. It's a startlingly instant shove into the seatback. Measured by our classical methods, the Model S P85 is now the fastest American sedan, and close to the fastest anywhere."

    Also, they were able to achieve .92 on the skidpad...

    "We've traveled 233.7 miles and wind up short by 1.7.

    "The total range -- adding the unused 4 miles, would be 238. Yes, 238 is 11 percent short of 265. Moreover, it was done while being very stingy with performance (for the most part). Is that 265 actually valid? If you drive predominately at highway speeds, then probably not. But were we to have included more medium-speed roads (long stretches at 45-50 mph) well, possibly."

    "During our drive, we used 78.2 kW-hrs of electricity (93 percent of the battery's rated capacity). What does that mean? It's the energy equivalent of 2.32 gasoline gallons, or 100.7 mpg-e before charging losses."

    "We've got even more to come this week on the new Model S! Stay tuned this Thurs., Aug. 30, for another extended range feature here at MotorTrend.com, along with a special episode of Wide Open Throttle at our Motor Trend YouTube Channel at: motortrend.com/youtube"
     
  2. Discoducky

    Discoducky Active Member

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    Soooo...did they fully recharge before their range test? Maybe? And I wish they would have published the energy-use chart so we could see just how "stingy" they actually were.

     
  3. Todd Burch

    Todd Burch Electron Pilot

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    Looks like they did recharge after the performance testing:

    This was before they headed out on the road.

    So assuming most driving at 65 MPH as they indicated, incorporating the braking and accelerating mentioned while maneuvering at speed, the ventilation on, accounting for some hilly terrain, and taking a few miles away for the age of the battery (that car's been driving for awhile, and has Get Amped testing on it as well), their test isn't far off. Tesla's chart shows about 260ish mi (plus or minus) at a constant 65 MPH. This difference can easily be eaten up by these factors.
     
  4. SCW-Greg

    SCW-Greg Active Member

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    #4 SCW-Greg, Aug 27, 2012
    Last edited: Aug 27, 2012
    I love this - 3.9 seconds!!! If ever there was a call for the Performance model, this is it.

    "When we crunched the numbers (with no weather correction because the car doesn't ingest air), the car's 0-60-mph time was 3.9 seconds, and it ssshhhhhh-ed past the quarter-mile mark in 12.5 seconds at 110.9 mph. We're on the bleeding edge here, kids. Sedans of this performance caliber are as rare as netting Higgs bosons in the Large Hadron Collider -- and in this case, all of them but the Tesla speak with German accents..."

    "...And were we to have measured those 0-60 mph times from the first twitch of accelerator movement instead of after the standard 1-foot roll-out, the Model S would be already off and away while the gas cars were still reacting to their suddenly opened throttles. It's a startlingly instant shove into the seatback. Measured by our classical methods, the Model S P85 is now the fastest American sedan, and close to the fastest anywhere."
     
  5. loganss

    loganss Spaceman

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    Wish they would have put the mileage of the car and a shot of their energy usage graph from the screen. All in all I'm satisfied with the results. The guy did say they punched it a few time in the range test, and there were prob a ton of hills.

    I can't stand these kind of CO2 statements. It's an apples to oranges comparison, especially when they don't incorporate the same "from the stack" type emissions for an ICE car. It's not like oil just magically gets transported to the gas station and comes refined without any CO2 cost.
     
  6. contaygious

    contaygious Active Member

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    Whoa 3.9 seconds? Where did that come from? Glad I got the biggest battery now with that range!

    Also, thy said that's elon's car with the p85 badge. Strange he has a badge on it.
     
  7. Zythryn

    Zythryn MS 70D, MX 90D

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    I also am a bit curious to here is they used the default(?) standard recharge or the range recharge setting?
    Driving 65, into a headwind, and with some suddenly braking and accelerating as they mentioned, I could see it cutting into the range.
    However, I also wouldn't be surprised if they recharged in standard which would give them less range.
     
  8. dsm363

    dsm363 Roadster + Sig Model S

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    #8 dsm363, Aug 27, 2012
    Last edited: Aug 27, 2012
    I thought the multiple paragraphs trying to create tension about the running empty were probably unncecssary but good to see real numbers. I wonder if it was a range charge or not too.

    I think the problem with their estimated range was likely they immediately set out for range testing after doing the acceleration tests it seems from the article.
     
  9. Rifleman

    Rifleman Now owns 2 Model S's!!!

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    I wonder how many kWh of battery they burned up on the drag strip before making the long drive, and if that battery usage was included on the range test. It sounds like their range test was the sort of real world driving we have been looking for to get some actual range numbers, but we need to know all the data before we can interpret their results.
     
  10. mnx

    mnx 2013 P85

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    they charged the car in between... "But after our testing wrapped, and we plugged it in to recharge, I happened to glance at the car's big, 17-inch, multi-touch display and its energy-use data. Eeek -- all of our testing, including a few dragstrip runs just for photography, had consumed 13 miles.

    Read more: http://www.motortrend.com/roadtests/alternative/1208_2012_tesla_model_s_test_and_range_verification/viewall.html#ixzz24lha2DoC"
     
  11. Rifleman

    Rifleman Now owns 2 Model S's!!!

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    Opps, should have read it more carefully. Thanks MNX!
     
  12. mnx

    mnx 2013 P85

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    MT publishes 0-60 #'s with simulated rollout... eg. they don't start the timer until the car has traveled 12-18". Hence 3.9s (vs. 4.3/4.4s that Edmunds and Tesla publish). This was discussed quite a bit on the threads discussing the Edmunds perf #'s...

    Also this:

    "And were we to have measured those 0-60 mph times from the first twitch of accelerator movement instead of after the standard 1-foot roll-out, the Model S would be already off and away while the gas cars were still reacting to their suddenly opened throttles.

    Read more: http://www.motortrend.com/roadtests/alternative/1208_2012_tesla_model_s_test_and_range_verification/viewall.html#ixzz24lim4esf"
     
  13. dpeilow

    dpeilow Moderator

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    Overall I think that range is pretty good. Given the difference between the Roadsters 244 and real highway range of around 170 (70 mph on the motorway in range mode), I was expecting a similar ratio here, which would have been 209 miles. So they've bested that it would appear.
     
  14. teslasguy

    teslasguy MSP P#1117

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    Sure hope they keep the P85 badging. Especially since they removed the Carbon Fiber trim front/back.
     
  15. onlinespending

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    This brings up a good point. The fact is, the times you need the larger range are when you'll make longer trips between cities for instance. That sort of traveling will pretty much always involve a highway/interstate, so you're going to be driving at a speed of at least 65 mph, thereby reducing the range. It's when you drive locally (within your city) on surface roads that you'll get the best "range". But it's not like you'll drive 250 miles within a city in one day, and you'll likely be charging it every night anyways. So you'll never get the range benefit of city or slower driving (though you'll certainly benefit from an efficiency perspective and electricity costs per mile).

    Long story short, 300 mile ideal range is meaningless if those driving conditions would never be practical for a 300 mile uninterrupted trip. You really only care about the range under long distance driving conditions.
     
  16. dsm363

    dsm363 Roadster + Sig Model S

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    If they had simply slowed to 60mph when they started to notice that it was going to be close it might not have been a problem. Ideal range really is ideal range. Highway speeds of 65 mph with wind, hills, acceleration will have an impact so the almost 240 miles is likely close to the floor of what you'd see (probably 220-240 would be my guess).
     
  17. Rifleman

    Rifleman Now owns 2 Model S's!!!

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    The way I see it, there are two real range numbers you need to know.

    The first is your every day range. This number would be how far car you drive in normal charge mode making zero attempt to conserve energy. Divide this out to allow for side range degradation over time, and then subtract your daily commute plus a few side trips from this number (I am going for daily commute x 1.5 for myself) This is a pass fail number, either the car will allow you to drive every day without worrying about running out of juice, or it will not.

    The second number is the maximum ferry range of the car. This is the number that was tested in this test. Charged in range mode, how far can you go one way on the highway. This test tells us that with the 85 kWh pack, a 220 mile one way trip should be no problem, and if you are willing to really manage your efficiency, you can go a bit farther.

    In this case, I say that the 85 kWh passes both tests, it has more range than 99% of the commuting populace would need on a daily basis, and has enough highway range for true inter-city travel.
     
  18. rolosrevenge

    rolosrevenge Dr. EVS

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    I think that this is a great review. It proves the performance specs and the usability of the range. They would have made their trip if not for their detour (I think that they would have made it anyways). Also, they cut short to stop at a charging station for a quick fill, probably only 10 min, before they could continue.
     
  19. SCW-Greg

    SCW-Greg Active Member

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    Oh good catch Mnx. I read right over the meaning of that.
     
  20. Robert.Boston

    Robert.Boston Model S VIN P01536

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    My reading of the range testing: these guys didn't understand how to use the car. "Time and again I had to override the cruise control and punch the brakes because of a lane-changing car or sharply accelerate to get around somebody who seemed to suddenly fall asleep directly in front of us." Maybe life is different in California, but I just drove 120 miles on I-95 and can only recall applying my brakes twice -- and that would have been zero if I had regenerative slowing. The fact that this review never discusses the effect of the regen suggests that they weren't using "one-pedal driving" to good advantage.
     

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