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MPP Comfort Coilovers - How Much More Comfortable?

Dave EV

Active Member
Jun 23, 2009
1,916
1,604
San Diego
I hope this response can provide some insight and value to you guys. I've installed both the adjustable and non adjustables and will say that the non adjustables are amazing if set to their optimal ride height, 365 to 380mm from hub center to fender. If you want to be lower than 365mm then you should go with the adjustables. I personally think 370mm is perfect for them and where I set the car below. It's basically the same drop as Eibach springs out of the box.
Super helpful, and really nice pics to boot!

Is that 370mm front and rear? It looks like it's slightly closer in the rear as it normally is due to how the fender is cut, or is that an optical illusion?
 

GoldCountryCA

Ordered 5/2, M3LR wh/bl/18”
May 5, 2021
85
101
Cool, CA
I live in California so I barely see salt roads unless I go to Tahoe or Mammoth. When I do I always do a pressure wash to make sure I mitigate the corrosion. Just putting in my 2c. If you don’t track you car, save yourself $1k
Unless CA DOT changed in the last couple years, there’s no salt or beet juice in Tahoe or Mammoth. They only use sand in CA.
 
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P3D-R

Member
Jan 15, 2020
238
270
Fremont, California
Super helpful, and really nice pics to boot!

Is that 370mm front and rear? It looks like it's slightly closer in the rear as it normally is due to how the fender is cut, or is that an optical illusion?
Thanks Dave for the compliments. It's an illusion and the angle of the photo. It can also be the way the tires are "shadowed".
 
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Dave EV

Active Member
Jun 23, 2009
1,916
1,604
San Diego
Thanks Dave for the compliments. It's an illusion and the angle of the photo. It can also be the way the tires are "shadowed".
Thanks for that - just double checking because on my LR RWD, the hub-fender heights are around 10 mm higher in the front - 405 mm front and 395 mm rear or about 16" front / 15.5" rear.
 

P3D-R

Member
Jan 15, 2020
238
270
Fremont, California
Thanks for that - just double checking because on my LR RWD, the hub-fender heights are around 10 mm higher in the front - 405 mm front and 395 mm rear or about 16" front / 15.5" rear.
I am doing a couple of RWD comfort non adjustables within the next few weeks for the first time so I'll have data on that specific model for spring perch heights and resulting hub to fender heights. Assuming the motion ratios are the same I believe we're around 0.85 front and 0.6 or 0.65 rear. TBH 405/395 seems really high and very near stock ride height for the AWD model. I don't have baseline data for RWD as yet but will soon. At those heights you will have less droop and ironically may not ride as well as it could. It's hard to conceptualize and I know it seems counterintuitive. I think 385 to 390 would be the sweet spot for the high setting. Which model of MPP's did you get? Adj or Non adj? One great thing MPP has done on their custom adjustable dampers is allowing for more stroke versus the standard KW V3 kits. Anywhere from 0.5" to 1.0" iirc front to rear respectively. I can't recall which is which but I would imagine more stroke for the rear to create more droop back there would be most helpful to ride quality.

So back to getting your car setup evenly. If you want the front to match the rear so you need to lower the front by 10mm you'll multiply that by the motion ratio of 0.85 and you'll know how much to displace/lower the front spring perch. 10mm x 0.85 = 8.5mm. Don't forget to align the car every time you make height adjustments. Even if the car drives straight doesn't mean you have an alignment that won't rip through your tires or kill energy efficiency. We always use calipers for the greatest accuracy and repeatability. I have actually used my floor standing spring compressor to make quick work of setting spring perch positions in case you're wondering what's going on here.

1624212604970.png


On the AWD model I've actually put my car on scales and found that we can achieve near perfect corner weights with symmetrical ride height front and rear. We are off by about 1% at 135# driver and near dead on at a little over a 200# driver iirc. I'm uncertain about RWD but it will surely be different since there is less weight up front. I would imagine that having the front ride height higher than the rear will produce better corner weights on a RWD. The recommendations from MPP are in reference to retaining symmetrical battery pack clearances if iirc so it will have a forward rake. I'll need to look back at the instructions. I've basically memorized all my settings for AWD TM3's and soon will do the same for the RWD.

1624212809848.png
 
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Dave EV

Active Member
Jun 23, 2009
1,916
1,604
San Diego
I am doing a couple of RWD comfort non adjustables within the next few weeks for the first time so I'll have data on that specific model for spring perch heights and resulting hub to fender heights. Assuming the motion ratios are the same I believe we're around 0.85 front and 0.6 or 0.65 rear. TBH 405/395 seems really high and very near stock ride height for the AWD model. I don't have baseline data for RWD as yet but will soon. At those heights you will have less droop and ironically may not ride as well as it could. It's hard to conceptualize and I know it seems counterintuitive. I think 385 to 390 would be the sweet spot for the high setting. Which model of MPP's did you get? Adj or Non adj? One great thing MPP has done on their custom adjustable dampers is allowing for more stroke versus the standard KW V3 kits. Anywhere from 0.5" to 1.0" iirc front to rear respectively. I can't recall which is which but I would imagine more stroke for the rear to create more droop back there would be most helpful to ride quality.

So back to getting your car setup evenly. If you want the front to match the rear so you need to lower the front by 10mm you'll multiply that by the motion ratio of 0.85 and you'll know how much to displace/lower the front spring perch. 10mm x 0.85 = 8.5mm. Don't forget to align the car every time you make height adjustments. Even if the car drives straight doesn't mean you have an alignment that won't rip through your tires or kill energy efficiency. We always use calipers for the greatest accuracy and repeatability. I have actually used my floor standing spring compressor to make quick work of setting spring perch positions in case you're wondering what's going on here.

View attachment 675610

On the AWD model I've actually put my car on scales and found that we can achieve near perfect corner weights with symmetrical ride height front and rear. We are off by about 1% at 135# driver and near dead on at a little over a 200# driver iirc. I'm uncertain about RWD but it will surely be different since there is less weight up front. I would imagine that having the front ride height higher than the rear will produce better corner weights on a RWD. The recommendations from MPP are in reference to retaining symmetrical battery pack clearances if iirc so it will have a forward rake. I'll need to look back at the instructions. I've basically memorized all my settings for AWD TM3's and soon will do the same for the RWD.

View attachment 675611
Thanks for that - I should be clear that the 405/395mm F/R numbers were OEM/stock hub-fender heights. Just a baseline - looking to get MPP Comforts (on the fence between fixed/adjustable units) later this year.
 
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dfwatt

Best Car Ever
Sep 24, 2018
3,272
5,464
FL
Thanks for that - I should be clear that the 405/395mm F/R numbers were OEM/stock hub-fender heights. Just a baseline - looking to get MPP Comforts (on the fence between fixed/adjustable units) later this year.
If you can stretch just a bit on the cost, get the adjustable. It's well worth the extra money and additionally the body of the shock is stainless steel so if you're in a winter climate it's going to resist oxidation and rust way better. The Comfort adjustable gives you such an enormous range, from really soft and compliant to firm enough to take it on a track. And the adjustment is real easy too.
 
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dwrecckk

Member
Jul 24, 2013
17
17
California
These just arrived today. I went with the Non Adjustable Comforts because I already have a Porsche Cayman GT4 that I use for performance driving.

I was just curious if any of the suspension gods in this thread had advice on setting these up correctly. I have HR springs on the car currently and I scrape everywhere. ( I have Side Skirts and a Front Lip). Ironically, My GT4 has significantly more ground clearance.

HR Springs suggest a 1.2” drop all around but in my application the front is slammed (1 finger), while the rear is higher (2 finger). Was hoping to raise and even out the stance. Something similar to .7-.9”. If there’s any “ideal” setting, I’d love to hear about it :)
 

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Dave EV

Active Member
Jun 23, 2009
1,916
1,604
San Diego
These just arrived today. I went with the Non Adjustable Comforts because I already have a Porsche Cayman GT4 that I use for performance driving.

I was just curious if any of the suspension gods in this thread had advice on setting these up correctly. I have HR springs on the car currently and I scrape everywhere. ( I have Side Skirts and a Front Lip). Ironically, My GT4 has significantly more ground clearance.

HR Springs suggest a 1.2” drop all around but in my application the front is slammed (1 finger), while the rear is higher (2 finger). Was hoping to raise and even out the stance. Something similar to .7-.9”. If there’s any “ideal” setting, I’d love to hear about it :)
Just look for @P3D-R's posts above for suggestions. He's even in the Bay Area, probably not that far from you if you need help in person. Specifically these two posts:
MPP Comfort Coilovers - How Much More Comfortable?
MPP Comfort Coilovers - How Much More Comfortable?

The short version is this - set the ride height between 365-380 mm from hub to fender front and rear.
I hope this response can provide some insight and value to you guys. I've installed both the adjustable and non adjustables and will say that the non adjustables are amazing if set to their optimal ride height, 365 to 380mm from hub center to fender. If you want to be lower than 365mm then you should go with the adjustables. I personally think 370mm is perfect for them and where I set the car below.
 
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yxm3

Member
Aug 1, 2019
31
16
New Haven
Just look for @P3D-R's posts above for suggestions. He's even in the Bay Area, probably not that far from you if you need help in person. Specifically these two posts:
MPP Comfort Coilovers - How Much More Comfortable?
MPP Comfort Coilovers - How Much More Comfortable?

The short version is this - set the ride height between 365-380 mm from hub to fender front and rear.
Those are billet aluminum forks anodized black! Maybe I should refer to them as forged instead.
My set arrived a few weeks ago. Any recommended installers near New Haven area?
 

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