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MY accelerated on it’s own!

jcanoe

Active Member
Oct 2, 2020
2,626
2,593
Maryland
After initially exploring the different driving settings of my Model Y I decided to set the Model Y to creep mode. I park inside my home garage and I want my foot on the brake pedal as the Model Y slowly rolls forward, enters the garage. Also, be sure that you have Obstacle Aware Acceleration enabled under Autopilot settings.
 

DanDi58

Active Member
Jun 22, 2020
1,010
762
Dayton NJ
I think many here neglected the fact that the OP said that this is his second Tesla, so I imagine he is very well aware of things like creep mode and how one-pedal driving works. I'm one who - as a former Audi owner - is interested in any discussion of SUA. I would also think that with the amount of data that Teslas store and/or transmit, there would be a log of this event. Will be following with interest.
 

Silicon Desert

Active Member
Oct 1, 2018
3,489
3,342
Sparks NV / GF 1
After initially exploring the different driving settings of my Model Y I decided to set the Model Y to creep mode. I park inside my home garage and I want my foot on the brake pedal as the Model Y slowly rolls forward, enters the garage. Also, be sure that you have Obstacle Aware Acceleration enabled under Autopilot settings.
yes, that is precisely what I do... creep on and foot near the brake pedal. I've tried creep off for a couple of months after having the car, and didn't like it, but I realize many drivers do like it. As with you, I feel more confident of not having an issue while pulling into my garage with creep on and letting it slowly pull in while I modulate it with the brake. And to me it feels more like my old ice cars I've driven for decades.
 
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JohnSnowNW

Active Member
Feb 13, 2015
2,644
2,769
Minnesota
man, some people are rude on here. It was a legitimate concern and peeps are trying to say there is NO WAY it could do that. Its a vehicle with a computer and obviously the most high-tech vehicle made. It can most certainly do what she said as computers do have problems etc..
I am glad you are okay and I appreciate you telling us your story.

Giving impossible scenarios equal weight does nothing to help the guy figure out what happened.
 
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Mike_TV

Member
Apr 29, 2020
576
435
Chicagoland
@Johnstac Any update? It certainly sounds like you had an event and I am interested in the outcome.

Me too but I think we'll never hear back from the OP as the real reason. Same with the other claims of unintended acceleration threads that have popped up here before. No one will ever want to admit that was a loose floor mat.
 

mark95476

Active Member
Jun 21, 2020
1,495
857
Bay Area CA
OP didn't crash so it's not really embarrassing.

Me too but I think we'll never hear back from the OP as the real reason. Same with the other claims of unintended acceleration threads that have popped up here before. No one will ever want to admit that was a loose floor mat.
 

Gogamecox2010

Member
Nov 30, 2019
12
19
Atlanta, GA, USA
My vehicle has done this a couple times in low speed settings. I discovered I have a tendency to inadvertently hit the shifter and trigger cruise. It’s far easier to do than one might think. (Especially after shifting out of park or reverse) After realizing this my car has not done it since.
 

mark95476

Active Member
Jun 21, 2020
1,495
857
Bay Area CA
There's a huge difference between "accidentially" hitting the shifter (or accelerator pedal) and a car accelerating all on its own with no input.

There was another instance where a new owner's wife hit another car while trying to park. There was a thought that accidentially enabling cruise could cause this or similar situations, but I don't think anyone could get it to happen.

The theory:
Your Tesla is parked, you get into your car, and it immediate enables cruise (say 45 mph) and smashes you into the wall or another parked car in front of you.

My vehicle has done this a couple times. I discovered I inadvertently hit the shifter and triggered cruise. It’s far easier to do than you might think. Since I’ve become aware of that it hasn’t happened since.
 

jcanoe

Active Member
Oct 2, 2020
2,626
2,593
Maryland
The Tesla vehicle has to be moving forward at some minimum speed before you can enable Autopilot. Try this a stop sign or stop light; Autopilot will not engage and there is an audible warning.

Under Autopilot settings be sure to set Obstacle Aware Acceleration to On. That will prevent the Tesla vehicle from accelerating when the proximity sensors detect a parked vehicle or a barrier.
 
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E_R_N

Member
Jun 16, 2020
146
116
Vancouver
Thanks for clarifying; does the vehicle ahead need to be moving forward when you engage Autopilot?
Nope. Dead stopped anywhere, even my kids school parking lot. As long as it has something it thinks is a lane line and it has a stopped vehicle in front it will let you double click down and you can choose your speed with the scroll wheel. When the car in front moves, you do too. I only have AP though, enhanced or FSD may act different.
 
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rincewind

Member
Nov 5, 2019
551
300
London England
BAck in the early 80's (yes I know, a long time ago), Jaguar XJS's were accelerating on thier own. It turned out that the 'then new fangled' fuel injection electronics were prone to interference from radio controlled model signals.
 

DonaldBecker

Member
Aug 24, 2020
150
164
95033
BAck in the early 80's (yes I know, a long time ago), Jaguar XJS's were accelerating on thier own. It turned out that the 'then new fangled' fuel injection electronics were prone to interference from radio controlled model signals.

Do you have any references to that?

The only thing I've found is a report that slightly later cars, late 1980s, could have the cruise control actuator fail to disengage due to dirt in the system.
 

WattsappMTL

Member
Nov 2, 2020
120
71
Montreal
I can report definitively that my MY accelerated on its own, with no intervention from me. At the time, my default TACC engagement mode was "current speed". I was accelerating manually around 65 km/h when the car began to gain speed faster than I was commanding with the pedal. When I checked the display, I saw that TACC had engaged by itself, with a target speed of 115 km/h. I absolutely did not have my hand any where near the right stalk, and in any case there's no way for TACC to engage at such a high speed. It happened again a few days ago although in that case I had already engaged autopilot and was scrolling the speed up. It suddenly jumped to 115 and the car accelerated. I have reported the incidents to Tesla but they don't seem interested. Both occurred on the same stretch of road. I also experience decreases in TACC set speed that occur repeatedly at other locations. I suspect these speed change events are somehow related but the self-engagement of autopilot is bizarre.
 

WattsappMTL

Member
Nov 2, 2020
120
71
Montreal
yes, that is precisely what I do... creep on and foot near the brake pedal. I've tried creep off for a couple of months after having the car, and didn't like it, but I realize many drivers do like it. As with you, I feel more confident of not having an issue while pulling into my garage with creep on and letting it slowly pull in while I modulate it with the brake. And to me it feels more like my old ice cars I've driven for decades.
Each to his/her own - I actually enjoy using Hold mode with full single-pedal driving. After 6 months with the car, It's a rare occasion for my foot to touch the brake pedal. I also have an ICE vehicle and there's no problem transitioning back and forth. However, I also have a tight garage space and Creep mode is much easier to use when parking inside. I resolved this by setting up a new driver profile just for the garage. I put the car in Park in the driveway then select Garage profile before entering. That profjle also includes no auto-locking so I don't need my phone to get into the car when it's inside. When a driver gets back in the car after that, their own profile will automatically be selected. Backing out in Hold mode is no problem because it's easy to manage side clearance with the fender cameras
 
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