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My M3 vs my MS...the revolution is underway

ArcAngel

Member
Oct 14, 2015
57
220
Malvern, PA
I have been meaning to “give back” to this forum for all the advice and information I have gotten these past three years, so here goes. I won’t bury the lead—I think the Model 3 is a revolution, a full turn in many ways past the Model S, and it will put other car companies out of business. Even if the cost of the two cars were equal, I believe at this point I would opt for the Model 3.


The quick background: I took possession of my black MS 70D (AP1, PuP) in June of 2015, and received my Model 3 (PuP, “19 in wheels, Midnight Silver, EAP2) on February 28th. I still have my MS since the lease is not finished until June, so I am driving both each day/week.


I have nothing but love for my Model S, and I reserved my M3 on day one in March of 2016 because I figured it might arrive at the time my lease was ending. I wanted the option of going to the 3 from the S for mostly cost considerations. As the car was released and started being delivered, I made the decision to buy it since the replacement for my MS70D, the MS75D, was much more expensive with much less range. Now that I have spent a month with the M3, I can say the differences are much more dramatic, in a good way. I will try to avoid some of the obvious comparisons written on this forum unless I have something new to say about them, but in no particular order, here goes.


The Model 3 is a sports car to me, plain and simple, while the MS is a touring car. It drives harder/firmer than the MS. It’s not as comfortable a ride, but it’s certainly not uncomfortable, and in fact I prefer the ride, which feels more connected to the road. Maybe the BMW M3 vs 7 Series would be a good analogy?


As far as rear wheel drive vs dual, I don’t notice much difference in the driving between the two. Given the bigger battery size and being 1K lbs lighter, the 3 acceleration is much faster than my S anyway, and living in southeastern PA I simply don’t drive the car in snowy weather (stay home for a few hours till the roads are plowed). I can certainly see someone needing a dual motor model in certain circumstances/geographies, but for the vast majority of drivers I don’t know why you would pay extra for the dual motors. This rear wheel drive 3 has plenty of acceleration.


Interior notes:


1. Overall: The interior seems more refined and appointed than my S. The lack of a center cluster and the wood of the dash stand out and take over the aesthetics of the entire interior…and that change seems a big upgrade in the overall presentation of the interior. It’s clean, simple and pure genius.

2. Touch screen: In addition to being sharper and more responsive, the location makes it so easy to operate. In my S, I need to lean forward from my seat a couple of inches to even touch the screen. In my 3 I can do it without even completely extending my arm. Given that everything is done from this screen makes this a necessity, but now when I am in my S I am annoyed whenever I need to operate the screen.

3. Push button door: it is very convenient to simply push that button with your finger and then elbow your way out of the car, especially if you have one or two things in your hands when doing it. I also prefer the 3 outside handles to the presentation style of the S, after taking a week or so to get used to it. The overall feel of the doors is more solid and requiresa hard push to close tightly, including the trunk.

4. AP lack of stalk: I read much about this and dreaded it since I use AP1 all the time in my S driving from PHL to NYC and DC. While I still prefer the stalk, the lack of it has not proven to be a major inconvenience, and if Tesla turns the scroll wheel on the right side of the steering wheel into a speed controller, then it will be even less inconvenient. I rarely change the follow distance so having to do that via a menu is not a big deal to me, especially since you are using AP when you need to do this and it’s not a problem to take your eyes off the road for a few seconds.

5. Sound system: the 3 is far superior to my S…not even a close comparison on bass, midrange, and overall clarity. This goes for phone calls over the Bluetooth speaker. I don’t feel like I need to shout in the 3, which I often feel the need to do in the S.

6. Storage: I am very happy with the upfront storage of the center console (NA in the S). The overall cargo storage with the deep bay below the floor of the trunk, and the easy, one-finger flip down of both seats provides plenty of room. I never use the frunk in either car (it amazes me how people complain about having to use the app to open it…who is regularly using the frunk and for what??). I could see missing the hatch and extra room of the S if you are used to that, but I have a hard time thinking most people need this additional storage/cargo space. If you do, you would probably get an X or something completely different in the SUV world. It does not seem to be a material difference to me between 3 and S.

7. Roof: The 3 roof is fantastic, and I much prefer it to paying for a sunroof, which I personally never open in the S except to vent the car in the summer. For this I would like to see Tesla allow the app to crack the windows in the car.


I am assuming that software updates will take care of some omissions on the 3 like wifi, auto dimming high beams, support for Sirius radio, etc, but even if some things such as a heating steering wheel (I use all the time in the S) and rear heated seats never arrive, I don’t see enough things lacking that I would miss too much on a daily basis, particularly given the price difference in the two cars.


In summary, I think two things will happen as this car rolls out. First, the MS75D will be completely cannibalized and eventually even go away. I understand why some people would buy the 100D and want ludicrous mode, etc. Those people have money to burn and/or love speed. But why would anyone buy a 75D for what amounts to $30K+ more, and only get in addition the dual motor (see above) and marginally more cargo/passenger space, while getting 75 miles LESS range than the enhanced battery version of the M3? It makes no sense.


Second, once the full range of M3s come out, and the word gets out about this beyond the fanboys like me and 500K people who have ordered the early version of this car, the onslaught will be on. Once people can test drive this car next to other options, EV and ICE, it will be all over. If Tesla can ramp production to meet demand they will dominate the global car market. Their own production challenges are the only things that can stop this company—this car is that good.


One more comment: I used to think that the cars themselves and the supercharger network were the two biggest reasons that Tesla would eventually dominate the car world. Then a few weeks ago I was at Tesla HQ on a business trip and in speaking with someone there was told that they feel their real advantage is in the service/delivery center network. Those of us who own a Tesla know that there is practically no maintenance, and many less moving parts than in an ICE car. All the traditional car makers have a network of franchises who make all their margin on service. It they end up going EV, which the world is formally now moving toward, how will they provide enough revenue/incentive to keep those franchises profitable? This is a problem Tesla does not have as their service centers are all company owned and sized to be profitable given the lower volume of service needs. This has to have all of Detroit and the major players in Germany and Japan worried.


Thanks for reading. I’d welcome comments/complaints!
 

SomeJoe7777

Marginally-Known Member
Mar 28, 2015
2,174
5,601
Houston, TX
I'm in nearly exactly the same situation as you -- leased S85D getting returned April 23rd, day 1 line waiter, Model 3 delivered about 10 days ago.

I agree virtually 100% word-for-word with your assessment. The one thing that I may miss from the S is the off-the-line acceleration (the 85D has a 4.2 sec 0-60), but over the last 3 years I think I've worked that out of my system. The other items in the 3 far outweigh the slightly slower 4.8-4.9 sec 0-60. Otherwise, I will not miss the S at all.
 

ArcAngel

Member
Oct 14, 2015
57
220
Malvern, PA
I'm in nearly exactly the same situation as you -- leased S85D getting returned April 23rd, day 1 line waiter, Model 3 delivered about 10 days ago.

I agree virtually 100% word-for-word with your assessment. The one thing that I may miss from the S is the off-the-line acceleration (the 85D has a 4.2 sec 0-60), but over the last 3 years I think I've worked that out of my system. The other items in the 3 far outweigh the slightly slower 4.8-4.9 sec 0-60. Otherwise, I will not miss the S at all.
Thanks, SomeJoe7777. I can see where an 85D offer a significant difference over my 70D, but we are talking about degrees of goodness here. They are all fast, and this M3 is plenty fast enough!
 

iluvmacs

Member
Jan 27, 2014
488
803
Madison, WI
You have written all my feelings exactly. I am so happy we sold our S and got the 3. It's better in nearly every way. I almost cringe when I see people canceling their 3 reservation and getting an S.
 

ArcAngel

Member
Oct 14, 2015
57
220
Malvern, PA
By the way, the heated rear seats have been activated in the software update AFAIK! But there is no hardware in the steering wheel to activate, so that won't happen without hardware changes..
Thanks...I just saw that today on another thread. I have not received that update yet but I hope to before the cold weather abates here in the northeast!
 

jomo25

Active Member
Mar 16, 2012
2,105
225
Scottsdale, AZ
I have been meaning to “give back” to this forum for all the advice and information I have gotten these past three years, so here goes. I won’t bury the lead—I think the Model 3 is a revolution, a full turn in many ways past the Model S, and it will put other car companies out of business. Even if the cost of the two cars were equal, I believe at this point I would opt for the Model 3.


The quick background: I took possession of my black MS 70D (AP1, PuP) in June of 2015, and received my Model 3 (PuP, “19 in wheels, Midnight Silver, EAP2) on February 28th. I still have my MS since the lease is not finished until June, so I am driving both each day/week.


I have nothing but love for my Model S, and I reserved my M3 on day one in March of 2016 because I figured it might arrive at the time my lease was ending. I wanted the option of going to the 3 from the S for mostly cost considerations. As the car was released and started being delivered, I made the decision to buy it since the replacement for my MS70D, the MS75D, was much more expensive with much less range. Now that I have spent a month with the M3, I can say the differences are much more dramatic, in a good way. I will try to avoid some of the obvious comparisons written on this forum unless I have something new to say about them, but in no particular order, here goes.


The Model 3 is a sports car to me, plain and simple, while the MS is a touring car. It drives harder/firmer than the MS. It’s not as comfortable a ride, but it’s certainly not uncomfortable, and in fact I prefer the ride, which feels more connected to the road. Maybe the BMW M3 vs 7 Series would be a good analogy?


As far as rear wheel drive vs dual, I don’t notice much difference in the driving between the two. Given the bigger battery size and being 1K lbs lighter, the 3 acceleration is much faster than my S anyway, and living in southeastern PA I simply don’t drive the car in snowy weather (stay home for a few hours till the roads are plowed). I can certainly see someone needing a dual motor model in certain circumstances/geographies, but for the vast majority of drivers I don’t know why you would pay extra for the dual motors. This rear wheel drive 3 has plenty of acceleration.


Interior notes:


1. Overall: The interior seems more refined and appointed than my S. The lack of a center cluster and the wood of the dash stand out and take over the aesthetics of the entire interior…and that change seems a big upgrade in the overall presentation of the interior. It’s clean, simple and pure genius.

2. Touch screen: In addition to being sharper and more responsive, the location makes it so easy to operate. In my S, I need to lean forward from my seat a couple of inches to even touch the screen. In my 3 I can do it without even completely extending my arm. Given that everything is done from this screen makes this a necessity, but now when I am in my S I am annoyed whenever I need to operate the screen.

3. Push button door: it is very convenient to simply push that button with your finger and then elbow your way out of the car, especially if you have one or two things in your hands when doing it. I also prefer the 3 outside handles to the presentation style of the S, after taking a week or so to get used to it. The overall feel of the doors is more solid and requiresa hard push to close tightly, including the trunk.

4. AP lack of stalk: I read much about this and dreaded it since I use AP1 all the time in my S driving from PHL to NYC and DC. While I still prefer the stalk, the lack of it has not proven to be a major inconvenience, and if Tesla turns the scroll wheel on the right side of the steering wheel into a speed controller, then it will be even less inconvenient. I rarely change the follow distance so having to do that via a menu is not a big deal to me, especially since you are using AP when you need to do this and it’s not a problem to take your eyes off the road for a few seconds.

5. Sound system: the 3 is far superior to my S…not even a close comparison on bass, midrange, and overall clarity. This goes for phone calls over the Bluetooth speaker. I don’t feel like I need to shout in the 3, which I often feel the need to do in the S.

6. Storage: I am very happy with the upfront storage of the center console (NA in the S). The overall cargo storage with the deep bay below the floor of the trunk, and the easy, one-finger flip down of both seats provides plenty of room. I never use the frunk in either car (it amazes me how people complain about having to use the app to open it…who is regularly using the frunk and for what??). I could see missing the hatch and extra room of the S if you are used to that, but I have a hard time thinking most people need this additional storage/cargo space. If you do, you would probably get an X or something completely different in the SUV world. It does not seem to be a material difference to me between 3 and S.

7. Roof: The 3 roof is fantastic, and I much prefer it to paying for a sunroof, which I personally never open in the S except to vent the car in the summer. For this I would like to see Tesla allow the app to crack the windows in the car.


I am assuming that software updates will take care of some omissions on the 3 like wifi, auto dimming high beams, support for Sirius radio, etc, but even if some things such as a heating steering wheel (I use all the time in the S) and rear heated seats never arrive, I don’t see enough things lacking that I would miss too much on a daily basis, particularly given the price difference in the two cars.


In summary, I think two things will happen as this car rolls out. First, the MS75D will be completely cannibalized and eventually even go away. I understand why some people would buy the 100D and want ludicrous mode, etc. Those people have money to burn and/or love speed. But why would anyone buy a 75D for what amounts to $30K+ more, and only get in addition the dual motor (see above) and marginally more cargo/passenger space, while getting 75 miles LESS range than the enhanced battery version of the M3? It makes no sense.


Second, once the full range of M3s come out, and the word gets out about this beyond the fanboys like me and 500K people who have ordered the early version of this car, the onslaught will be on. Once people can test drive this car next to other options, EV and ICE, it will be all over. If Tesla can ramp production to meet demand they will dominate the global car market. Their own production challenges are the only things that can stop this company—this car is that good.


One more comment: I used to think that the cars themselves and the supercharger network were the two biggest reasons that Tesla would eventually dominate the car world. Then a few weeks ago I was at Tesla HQ on a business trip and in speaking with someone there was told that they feel their real advantage is in the service/delivery center network. Those of us who own a Tesla know that there is practically no maintenance, and many less moving parts than in an ICE car. All the traditional car makers have a network of franchises who make all their margin on service. It they end up going EV, which the world is formally now moving toward, how will they provide enough revenue/incentive to keep those franchises profitable? This is a problem Tesla does not have as their service centers are all company owned and sized to be profitable given the lower volume of service needs. This has to have all of Detroit and the major players in Germany and Japan worried.


Thanks for reading. I’d welcome comments/complaints!
Pretty much agree with everything you posted. The 3 is a revelation to me. Paired with our X, I feel like we are in car Nirvana now, covering essentially every use case our family of 4 (or 5 when the M-I-L is in town) has. I thoroughly enjoyed our S60 also before we traded in for the X. It was and amazing car itself. But we hadn’t driven one in a couple years. But I had a P85 S for a loaner recently and it is a very different car with its uses. I felt it was way too much (heavy, big, powered, and yes costly) for an everyday car. The X fits a different need so, it’s worth it for us.

But the 3. Paraphrasing Tin Cup about his 7-iron...I am in love with it. It is the perfect everyday car IMO. I won’t trade it for anything. Except if they make a Y with a nearly exact feel. And even then, I’m not sure.

I know Tesla wants to sell more Ss, esp given the margins and the 3 backlog. But the 3 has the potential to really hurt some companies. If they can get them out in quantity and with quality.
 

jkirkwood001

Supporting Member
Feb 20, 2018
954
2,097
Ottawa, ON
What great perspective, @ArcAngel, thanks for this.

You're doing nothing to abate my impatience to own an M3!

I have been meaning to “give back” to this forum for all the advice and information I have gotten these past three years, so here goes. I won’t bury the lead—I think the Model 3 is a revolution, a full turn in many ways past the Model S, and it will put other car companies out of business. Even if the cost of the two cars were equal, I believe at this point I would opt for the Model 3.


The quick background: I took possession of my black MS 70D (AP1, PuP) in June of 2015, and received my Model 3 (PuP, “19 in wheels, Midnight Silver, EAP2) on February 28th. I still have my MS since the lease is not finished until June, so I am driving both each day/week.


I have nothing but love for my Model S, and I reserved my M3 on day one in March of 2016 because I figured it might arrive at the time my lease was ending. I wanted the option of going to the 3 from the S for mostly cost considerations. As the car was released and started being delivered, I made the decision to buy it since the replacement for my MS70D, the MS75D, was much more expensive with much less range. Now that I have spent a month with the M3, I can say the differences are much more dramatic, in a good way. I will try to avoid some of the obvious comparisons written on this forum unless I have something new to say about them, but in no particular order, here goes.


The Model 3 is a sports car to me, plain and simple, while the MS is a touring car. It drives harder/firmer than the MS. It’s not as comfortable a ride, but it’s certainly not uncomfortable, and in fact I prefer the ride, which feels more connected to the road. Maybe the BMW M3 vs 7 Series would be a good analogy?


As far as rear wheel drive vs dual, I don’t notice much difference in the driving between the two. Given the bigger battery size and being 1K lbs lighter, the 3 acceleration is much faster than my S anyway, and living in southeastern PA I simply don’t drive the car in snowy weather (stay home for a few hours till the roads are plowed). I can certainly see someone needing a dual motor model in certain circumstances/geographies, but for the vast majority of drivers I don’t know why you would pay extra for the dual motors. This rear wheel drive 3 has plenty of acceleration.


Interior notes:


1. Overall: The interior seems more refined and appointed than my S. The lack of a center cluster and the wood of the dash stand out and take over the aesthetics of the entire interior…and that change seems a big upgrade in the overall presentation of the interior. It’s clean, simple and pure genius.

2. Touch screen: In addition to being sharper and more responsive, the location makes it so easy to operate. In my S, I need to lean forward from my seat a couple of inches to even touch the screen. In my 3 I can do it without even completely extending my arm. Given that everything is done from this screen makes this a necessity, but now when I am in my S I am annoyed whenever I need to operate the screen.

3. Push button door: it is very convenient to simply push that button with your finger and then elbow your way out of the car, especially if you have one or two things in your hands when doing it. I also prefer the 3 outside handles to the presentation style of the S, after taking a week or so to get used to it. The overall feel of the doors is more solid and requiresa hard push to close tightly, including the trunk.

4. AP lack of stalk: I read much about this and dreaded it since I use AP1 all the time in my S driving from PHL to NYC and DC. While I still prefer the stalk, the lack of it has not proven to be a major inconvenience, and if Tesla turns the scroll wheel on the right side of the steering wheel into a speed controller, then it will be even less inconvenient. I rarely change the follow distance so having to do that via a menu is not a big deal to me, especially since you are using AP when you need to do this and it’s not a problem to take your eyes off the road for a few seconds.

5. Sound system: the 3 is far superior to my S…not even a close comparison on bass, midrange, and overall clarity. This goes for phone calls over the Bluetooth speaker. I don’t feel like I need to shout in the 3, which I often feel the need to do in the S.

6. Storage: I am very happy with the upfront storage of the center console (NA in the S). The overall cargo storage with the deep bay below the floor of the trunk, and the easy, one-finger flip down of both seats provides plenty of room. I never use the frunk in either car (it amazes me how people complain about having to use the app to open it…who is regularly using the frunk and for what??). I could see missing the hatch and extra room of the S if you are used to that, but I have a hard time thinking most people need this additional storage/cargo space. If you do, you would probably get an X or something completely different in the SUV world. It does not seem to be a material difference to me between 3 and S.

7. Roof: The 3 roof is fantastic, and I much prefer it to paying for a sunroof, which I personally never open in the S except to vent the car in the summer. For this I would like to see Tesla allow the app to crack the windows in the car.


I am assuming that software updates will take care of some omissions on the 3 like wifi, auto dimming high beams, support for Sirius radio, etc, but even if some things such as a heating steering wheel (I use all the time in the S) and rear heated seats never arrive, I don’t see enough things lacking that I would miss too much on a daily basis, particularly given the price difference in the two cars.


In summary, I think two things will happen as this car rolls out. First, the MS75D will be completely cannibalized and eventually even go away. I understand why some people would buy the 100D and want ludicrous mode, etc. Those people have money to burn and/or love speed. But why would anyone buy a 75D for what amounts to $30K+ more, and only get in addition the dual motor (see above) and marginally more cargo/passenger space, while getting 75 miles LESS range than the enhanced battery version of the M3? It makes no sense.


Second, once the full range of M3s come out, and the word gets out about this beyond the fanboys like me and 500K people who have ordered the early version of this car, the onslaught will be on. Once people can test drive this car next to other options, EV and ICE, it will be all over. If Tesla can ramp production to meet demand they will dominate the global car market. Their own production challenges are the only things that can stop this company—this car is that good.


One more comment: I used to think that the cars themselves and the supercharger network were the two biggest reasons that Tesla would eventually dominate the car world. Then a few weeks ago I was at Tesla HQ on a business trip and in speaking with someone there was told that they feel their real advantage is in the service/delivery center network. Those of us who own a Tesla know that there is practically no maintenance, and many less moving parts than in an ICE car. All the traditional car makers have a network of franchises who make all their margin on service. It they end up going EV, which the world is formally now moving toward, how will they provide enough revenue/incentive to keep those franchises profitable? This is a problem Tesla does not have as their service centers are all company owned and sized to be profitable given the lower volume of service needs. This has to have all of Detroit and the major players in Germany and Japan worried.


Thanks for reading. I’d welcome comments/complaints!
 

xav-

Active Member
May 26, 2016
1,187
821
Orange County CA
IMO math is simple. Take any model S or X that is comparable to a 3... price is roughly twice as expensive.

Take the model 3s that are shipping right now for instance. Those are equivalent to loaded 100D. That's like $110k

Are air suspension and AWD worth $55k??
 
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dgpcolorado

high altitude member
Apr 25, 2015
2,511
3,407
The Western Slope, Colorado
You have written all my feelings exactly. I am so happy we sold our S and got the 3. It's better in nearly every way. I almost cringe when I see people canceling their 3 reservation and getting an S.
I'll disagree. I've kept my 3 reservation to keep my options open but I like almost everything about my S better than what I've seen of the 3. Since I bought the S used, it cost less than what most people are paying for the First Production 3. (The Y might be a better fit for me, although it will have some of the same things I don't like about the 3.)

Depends on what one wants and values in a car.
 

xav-

Active Member
May 26, 2016
1,187
821
Orange County CA
I'll disagree. I've kept my 3 reservation to keep my options open but I like almost everything about my S better than what I've seen of the 3. Since I bought the S used, it cost less than what most people are paying for the First Production 3. (The Y might be a better fit for me, although it will have some of the same things I don't like about the 3.)

Depends on what one wants and values in a car.
I don't think comparing a used car to a brand new one makes a lot of sense. You have got to look at things over the long run. A brand new 3 will last you a lot longer, and you will likely have less headaches over the long run, especially with an out of warranty S.

Also I wonder how much you really saved once taking into account the tax incentives.

But ...glad you like the car. I can understand why one would prefer it (bigger car, much more storage space etc)
 
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dgpcolorado

high altitude member
Apr 25, 2015
2,511
3,407
The Western Slope, Colorado
I don't think comparing a used car to a brand new one makes a lot of sense. You have got to look at things over the long run. A brand new 3 will last you a lot longer, and you will likely have less headaches over the long run, especially with an out of warranty S.

Also I wonder how much you really saved once taking into account the tax incentives.

But ...glad you like the car. I can understand why one would prefer it (bigger car, much more storage space etc)
Well, my used S had fewer than 7000 miles on it and a full CPO warranty (same as a new car, save for two years less on the eight year battery warranty). Also, I got the $6000 Colorado state tax credit (no longer applies to used cars) and I don't qualify for the federal tax credit (much too low income).

It is true that with my relatively high mileage — averaging 19,000 miles a year, most of it on long road trips — I am almost out of warranty, and that is a reason I've been considering a new Model 3. However, the cost of the exchange would be considerable and I can buy a lot of out of warranty service for the difference, I'm guessing.

So, it depends! Just wanted to point out the other side of the argument. My impression is that the majority of new Model 3 owners agree with the OP, which is fine (and great for Tesla, they seem to have a "hit" on their hands).
 

xav-

Active Member
May 26, 2016
1,187
821
Orange County CA
Well, my used S had fewer than 7000 miles on it and a full CPO warranty (same as a new car, save for two years less on the eight year battery warranty). Also, I got the $6000 Colorado state tax credit (no longer applies to used cars) and I don't qualify for the federal tax credit (much too low income).

It is true that with my relatively high mileage — averaging 19,000 miles a year, most of it on long road trips — I am almost out of warranty, and that is a reason I've been considering a new Model 3. However, the cost of the exchange would be considerable and I can buy a lot of out of warranty service for the difference, I'm guessing.

So, it depends! Just wanted to point out the other side of the argument. My impression is that the majority of new Model 3 owners agree with the OP, which is fine (and great for Tesla, they seem to have a "hit" on their hands).
Sounds like you got a good deal. I remember 2 years ago looking for an S... It was more like $53k for a used 2013 S60 with 40k miles and no credit! I was essentially saving like $12k over a brand new S with autopilot, leather and sunroof. CPO route was a non starter for me.
 

S4WRXTTCS

Well-Known Member
May 3, 2015
5,389
6,102
Snohomish, WA
Somewhat in the same boat, but instead of a lease I have the Tesla Resale Guarantee coming. Although now it doesn't look like I'll really need to rely on it.

I'm still a bit worried about not having good wiper control from the stalk. I don't believe for a second that I'll be happy with the automatic rain sensing. I've never owned a car which had a really good one.

I'm also a bit concerned about the wind noise, and road noise in the 3. People say it's worse than the S, and I felt like the S was pretty bad for such an expensive car. There have also been complaints about the Interior fan noise even when on low.

The Model 3 range/cost factor is so good that I might end up getting it despite my concerns once the AWD version is available. Especially if any significant new feature is released with AP2.
 
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anticitizen13.7

Not posting at TMC after 9/17/2018
Dec 22, 2012
3,638
5,761
United States
Thanks for the very informative comparison review.

I do expect the Model S to lose sales to Model 3, given the 3's advantages in cabin space and features. I think that Model S will retain the set of customers who want crossover-like rear storage space, but the looks and handling of a sedan. The hatch area of Model S is ridiculously huge. Tesla will have to seriously upgrade the Model S interior though, because the Model 3's convenience features (stuff like coat hooks, door bins, pockets) seriously outclass what is available on the S.
 

Lukez

Member
Mar 21, 2016
633
534
Ontario
I'll disagree. I've kept my 3 reservation to keep my options open but I like almost everything about my S better than what I've seen of the 3. Since I bought the S used, it cost less than what most people are paying for the First Production 3. (The Y might be a better fit for me, although it will have some of the same things I don't like about the 3.)

Depends on what one wants and values in a car.

Same here. The S is much better than the 3 for me just from size and storage capacity. It is an awesome road trip car, the 3 is just too small for my needs. A fast screen and no cluster isn't enough to sacrifice size.
 

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Formed in 2006, Tesla Motors Club (TMC) was the first independent online Tesla community. Today it remains the largest and most dynamic community of Tesla enthusiasts. Learn more.

Do you value your experience at TMC? Consider becoming a Supporting Member of Tesla Motors Club. As a thank you for your contribution, you'll get nearly no ads in the Community and Groups sections. Additional perks are available depending on the level of contribution. Please visit the Account Upgrades page for more details.


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