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MYLR real world mileage?

Peelz

Budding EV fanatic.
Apr 10, 2021
307
439
SE Iowa, the armpit.
one month with it... and still unable to drive responsibly. at least a couple throttle stabs here and there. :) used mostly for commuting.

we still do not go full down or up with the battery, but, 80% down to 30% was our most. we end up a little under estimated range. Battery use about 50% gave us 140 miles. making range around 280?

driving around on backroads at 55, is so peaceful and can return under the rated range line-a cool feature of the UI.
 

LeaveMeAlone

Member
Jun 4, 2021
48
65
Los Angeles
I am beginning to think longer range EVs are like Goldilocks. Can't be too hot, or too cold. Can't charge too high or let it go too low or your battery will suffer. Running AC or heat will knock that down as well. Basically take whatever the rated range of a Tesla, cut it in half, and you likely won't be disappointed. Assuming it isn't too hot or too cold...

This is our first Tesla, and our first really long range EV (>100 miles). I told my wife to go for the longest range one to be safe and to comfortably be where we want to be. I really wanted to go with the M3. She wanted the MY. We got the MY. Won't say I am regretting it as I love the car, but I think real world we are looking at 160-180 miles realistically if we play like Goldilocks with our car and to not over charge, run too low, run the AC on super hot days and still have a bit of a buffer. Most of the traffic on the highways is running 80.

I wish you could tow with the Model S in the US (with no potential warranty impact) as and we likely wouldn't have bought the MY. I don't like the MX so that wasn't even an option. So I can't wait for our MS to get here so we can have a pretty good range without sweating it. Doesn't help that Tesla can't really seem to make their EPA numbers for most people but some other companies seem to do better. Maybe with all the competition, things will get better for everyone.
Totally. The EPA range is nonsense, much like the estimated delivery date. Sweet spot seems to be 70-75 - I start losing a lot of range when I'm in the 80s.

Thanks everyone for all the feedback. I posted a separate thread with my findings from this first road trip here:

 
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DayTrippin

Member
Apr 30, 2021
710
675
Jax
While the teslike link is helpful, I've learned is there are lots of "real worlds". It helps with what you might expect at given speeds but no MY data. I just adjust by -10% to their consumption figures to ballpark it. Then throw in an adjustment for temps where I am using AC or heat, then factor in terrain, and weather, and do I have my aero wheel covers on or no. Pretty soon I am at 200 miles real-world range with MY LR if I don't want to deplete the battery too low or charge it too high.
 

Samyul

Member
Feb 18, 2021
63
55
Irvine, CA
I've done a couple of longer road trips with MYLR7, and my range tended to be somewhere between 150-200 miles. On one trip, I had about 200 miles of range showing with only about 100 miles to get home, buy the nav routed me to a supercharger. When I disregarded it, it advised me to keep my speed at under 65 or 70 mph. After doing that for about 30 minutes, I noticed my expected range kept creeping up, and I started driving like normal again (going 85 mph+). I ended up having 15-20% battery left by the time I got home.

On another trip, I charged to 100% in Barstow on my way to Vegas, which is about 158 miles out. I thought I'd have plenty of range left, but by the time I got to my resort, I was at under 15%. I understand that speed kills the range, but I can't help it. I've always been a fast driver, and I'm not about to just sit there behind a big rig the whole way. I can't do it.

I've got almost 4,000 miles on my car, and I think it understands me, and that I'm likely to push it with no regard for maintaining the range. Now, a 100% charge shows a range of 294. As much as that is painful to see, I realize even that is unrealistic given my driving habits. I thought about recalibrating the range by dropping the battery level low and then charging it back up a couple of times, but what's the point if that? The EPA range is wholly unrealistic, and I'd rather see a more realistic range.
 

LeaveMeAlone

Member
Jun 4, 2021
48
65
Los Angeles
I've done a couple of longer road trips with MYLR7, and my range tended to be somewhere between 150-200 miles. On one trip, I had about 200 miles of range showing with only about 100 miles to get home, buy the nav routed me to a supercharger. When I disregarded it, it advised me to keep my speed at under 65 or 70 mph. After doing that for about 30 minutes, I noticed my expected range kept creeping up, and I started driving like normal again (going 85 mph+). I ended up having 15-20% battery left by the time I got home.

On another trip, I charged to 100% in Barstow on my way to Vegas, which is about 158 miles out. I thought I'd have plenty of range left, but by the time I got to my resort, I was at under 15%. I understand that speed kills the range, but I can't help it. I've always been a fast driver, and I'm not about to just sit there behind a big rig the whole way. I can't do it.

I've got almost 4,000 miles on my car, and I think it understands me, and that I'm likely to push it with no regard for maintaining the range. Now, a 100% charge shows a range of 294. As much as that is painful to see, I realize even that is unrealistic given my driving habits. I thought about recalibrating the range by dropping the battery level low and then charging it back up a couple of times, but what's the point if that? The EPA range is wholly unrealistic, and I'd rather see a more realistic range.
Totally agree with you. Have found that showing percentages instead of mileage makes a difference psychologically. Otherwise speed really is not your friend on longer trips
 

Trip McNealy

Member
Jun 21, 2021
89
45
New Jersey
On a sort of related note, how long (days) can you go without having to charge your MY in your experiences? Humor me on this one...

I know a huge YMMV question but let's take this example:
You start with a freshly charged MY LR at 80%
You drive to work on normal roads - 35 and 55mph ones - maybe put some gentle rolling hills in here and there - for 20 miles each way (so 40 mi round trip)
You don't need to use A/C or Heat, windows down - it's a nice spring or fall day
You come back home and leave Sentry and Cabin protection modes on
You leave the car alone for the rest of the day

When you wake up the next morning is the car gonna be undriveable or will have enough charge to repeat those above steps all over again?

I don't have a Y yet so I can test this in person but I'm just curious :) Thank you.
 

LeaveMeAlone

Member
Jun 4, 2021
48
65
Los Angeles
On a sort of related note, how long (days) can you go without having to charge your MY in your experiences? Humor me on this one...

I know a huge YMMV question but let's take this example:
You start with a freshly charged MY LR at 80%
You drive to work on normal roads - 35 and 55mph ones - maybe put some gentle rolling hills in here and there - for 20 miles each way (so 40 mi round trip)
You don't need to use A/C or Heat, windows down - it's a nice spring or fall day
You come back home and leave Sentry and Cabin protection modes on
You leave the car alone for the rest of the day

When you wake up the next morning is the car gonna be undriveable or will have enough charge to repeat those above steps all over again?

I don't have a Y yet so I can test this in person but I'm just curious :) Thank you.
In my experience, if you're driving as you describe then you can probably get by with charging once a week (so 6-7 days without a charge).
 
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NCC81701

Member
Feb 28, 2020
82
101
San Diego
Totally. The EPA range is nonsense, much like the estimated delivery date. Sweet spot seems to be 70-75 - I start losing a lot of range when I'm in the 80s.

EPA Range isn't nonsense, it's just miss applied. The purpose of EPA range is a common baseline for comparison between models, not for estimating real world range. An audi E-tron have a 95kWh battery pack, a Mustang Mach-E ER+RWD have a 88kWh battery pack, but the former only have 222miles of EPA range while the Mach-E have 305 EPA Range; but you wouldn't know that the Mach E is way more efficient with its batteries than the Audi Etron if the manufacturer didn't have to do EPA range test. Under real world driving conditions you probably couldn't hit the EPA range in either car but the comparison will tell you that you can run longer w/ the Mach E than the Etron even though the Etron has more batteries. Without an EPA range test however, the consumer can easily be mislead with a simple bigger batteries == more range sales argument and not find out that their car actually has less range until they take it on the road..

You'll noticed I didn't compare it against Tesla. That's because under the EPA rules the manufacturer can run a 2-test cycle or a 5-test cycle. Basically every manufacturer except Tesla runs the 2 test cycle cuz it's cheaper, but Tesla decides to run the 5-test cycle because it lets them use a better efficiency factor and it results in a higher EPA range than everyone else. This is why when auto magazines does real world range comparison between say a Mach E and a Model Y the range difference in the real world isn't as dramatic as the EPA number suggests. In short, you can us EPA range to compare EVs between any manufacturer except Tesla, and you can really only use EPA range to compare Teslas to other Teslas.
 

AquaY

Supporting Member
Supporting Member
May 30, 2021
303
820
Long Island NY
While the teslike link is helpful, I've learned is there are lots of "real worlds". It helps with what you might expect at given speeds but no MY data. I just adjust by -10% to their consumption figures to ballpark it. Then throw in an adjustment for temps where I am using AC or heat, then factor in terrain, and weather, and do I have my aero wheel covers on or no. Pretty soon I am at 200 miles real-world range with MY LR if I don't want to deplete the battery too low or charge it too high.
What's the range difference you've experienced with and without the aero wheel covers?
 

DayTrippin

Member
Apr 30, 2021
710
675
Jax
I would say maybe about 3% on the highway but I haven't been traveling as fast as I might usually drive. I think they might help more at higher speeds. I have been around 75 mph but usually, I might be over 80 on the highways here. Around town the wheel covers are pretty much worthless other than to protect the wheels.
 
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WindPower

Member
Mar 23, 2021
43
29
Long Island
On a sort of related note, how long (days) can you go without having to charge your MY in your experiences? Humor me on this one...

I have a LRY, and drive around 35 miles a day during the week at modest speeds, less on weekends. I charge once week (in the summer I charge Sunday night).

The best range I have gotten on one charge (starting with a full charge of 80% down to 3% charge) was 250 miles in the spring without AC or heat. In the summer I usually can drive about 225 miles by Sunday night.

I don’t use Tesla’s estimated range which is wildly inflated. I only use the % state of charge and estimate how many miles I can still drive on a charge.
 
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DayTrippin

Member
Apr 30, 2021
710
675
Jax
You would think they can get the actual estimated range right on the home screen but they don't so like many others I just use % instead of the remaining range. If I use the nav function it is pretty accurate at estimating my SOC at my destination. Of if I use the energy screen and the past 5 miles or other distance. So obviously they have the information they could provide from another source. So now they just need to do it or give the option to choose another source.
 

Rocky_H

Well-Known Member
Feb 19, 2015
6,660
7,952
Boise, ID
You would think they can get the actual estimated range right on the home screen but they don't
There are other places for a range estimation. That is not a range estimation. It's a fuel gauge. It's the amount of energy, divided by the efficiency constant from the EPA testing to convert it into some kind of unit people can kind of understand.
 
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AquaY

Supporting Member
Supporting Member
May 30, 2021
303
820
Long Island NY
There are other places for a range estimation. That is not a range estimation. It's a fuel gauge. It's the amount of energy, divided by the efficiency constant from the EPA testing to convert it into some kind of unit people can kind of understand.
That’s a great explanation
 

Trip McNealy

Member
Jun 21, 2021
89
45
New Jersey
I have a LRY, and drive around 35 miles a day during the week at modest speeds, less on weekends. I charge once week (in the summer I charge Sunday night).

The best range I have gotten on one charge (starting with a full charge of 80% down to 3% charge) was 250 miles in the spring without AC or heat. In the summer I usually can drive about 225 miles by Sunday night.

I don’t use Tesla’s estimated range which is wildly inflated. I only use the % state of charge and estimate how many miles I can still drive on a charge.

Excellent, thank you. What is the recommended % you should not let your Y dip past? (akin to the old dad recommendation of "never go less than a 1/4 tank of gas")
 

DayTrippin

Member
Apr 30, 2021
710
675
Jax
Now long do you want your battery to last (lifespan)? A lot of great information at battery university. Based on what they said between 25%-75% SOC is a pretty good place to be. Going up to 100% definitely accelerates wear so to speak and if keep at that high level for an extended period of time is very bad. Going too low isn't as bad as going too high frequently.
 

Fourdoor

Member
May 31, 2016
885
699
North East Arkansas
You should probably go by Wh/mi as it's an easy number for owners to look up and it's a better indication of consumption. The three main killers of range are speed, elevation, and ambient temperature. Going 80 mph, or anywhere near it, on your trip did not help. There's a chart on Teslike illustrating the impact of speed on range and it's eye opening.

For comparison, I have about 6,900 miles on my MYP and my lifetime Wh/mi is 275 or about 285 miles of range. That puts lifetime efficiency over 90%.

What ever happened to Teslike? Page has not been updated in two years (since Sep 2019) :(

Keith
 

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