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Nanowire modification on Li-ion

Discussion in 'Battery Discussion' started by SByer, Dec 19, 2007.

  1. SByer

    SByer '08 #383

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  2. tonybelding

    tonybelding Active Member

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    For convenience, here's a repeat of the same info I posted in the other thread (PHEVs Moving In). . .

    Some researchers contacted by Chemistry World questioned whether the technique would be useful for commercial batteries. 'The most appealing result is obviously the high cycling capacity that these materials are able to deliver,' said one leading expert on lithium battery anodes, who asked not to be named. 'However, the test is limited to only 10 cycles and this is far too few to determine the industrial impact of the electrode. Also, the rate of the cycling test is very low and thus the power capability, another important practical requisite, has not been ascertained.'

    Full article here: http://www.rsc.org/chemistryworld/News/2007/December/17120702.asp

    Also this. . .

    "It's a really nice proof of concept," says Gerbrand Ceder, a materials scientist and battery expert at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge. Making lithium ion batteries capable of holding 10 times the charge of conventional versions still requires a cathode that holds 10 times the charge, too, Ceder says. However, he adds, incorporating a silicon nanowire-based anode could allow batterymakers to reduce the weight and volume of the anode and add more cathode material in its place, which could give lithium batteries a power boost.

    Full article here: http://sciencenow.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/2007/1217/2
     
  3. TEG

    TEG TMC Moderator

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    That is an exciting development. The nanotechnology is reminiscent of the ultracap breakthrough that MIT had previously announced (but has yet to show up commercially). Using nanotech like that for Li-Ion would make it much easier for Tesla since the voltage characteristics of batteries are easier to deal with than the behavior of ultracapacitors.

    Still, a lab breakthrough doesn't always mean production ready anytime soon (if ever).
     
  4. vfx

    vfx Well-Known Member

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    Great!

    Let's hope the 10 fold increase does not also apply to the price....
     
  5. JRP3

    JRP3 Hyperactive Member

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    I see this as more of an advancement in durability and cycle life than capacity, and I don't know if it's any improvement over what Altairnano has already achieved.
     
  6. JRP3

    JRP3 Hyperactive Member

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    Another report, don't hold your breath on this one:
    Technology Review: Super-Charging Lithium Batteries
     
  7. Serge

    Serge Member

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    It seems cycle life is the problem with silicon nanowire anodes, but there is progress. Apparently they got the cycle count up to 200 at 20% capacity loss.

    6a00d8341c4fbe53ef0120a5c02790970c-800wi.png
     
  8. JRP3

    JRP3 Hyperactive Member

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    They only need to improve that by at least 10 times :eek:
     
  9. edo

    edo Member

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    I'm not sure how, but it looks like the loss is logarithmic, the amount of capacity lost between 120 to 200 cycles is about equal to the amount between 80-120 and between 40-80 cycles. If this continues, it would lose the same amount from 200 to 320 cycles.

    This battery would still be an advance if partial cycles scale (i.e. two half charges = 1 full cycle)... a battery half the weight of Tesla's current design would only charge 20% per day, so after 1000 cycles it would have lost 20% of its full charge capacity, and still would last 4 times longer than the current battery!
     
  10. Serge

    Serge Member

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    Amprius

    Cui's technology moving from lab to manufacturing
    Interestinly, Tesla is part of the team.
     
  11. Iz

    Iz EVs are here to stay

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    A very interesting and relatively simplified approach. A conservative 40% increase will allow a 322 mile range on the 230 mile range Model S. I dare say what the 200% "future" increase would imply.
     
  12. bolosky

    bolosky Member

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    Actually, it doesn't say that Tesla is part of the team. It says:
    Which sounds to me more like they've hired former Tesla engineers, not done a deal with the company.
     
  13. Serge

    Serge Member

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    Indeed. However why then is Tesla Motors corporate logo displayed so prominently?
     
  14. JRP3

    JRP3 Hyperactive Member

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    I like the company photo:
    [​IMG]
     

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