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New Li-Ion Batteries Charge 70 Percent in 2 Minutes, Last for 20 Years

DJ Frustration

Former Model X Sig, Model S, Model 3, Model Y
Jun 19, 2012
685
138
Miami, Florida
Ultra-fast charging batteries that can be 70% recharged in just two minutes -- ScienceDaily

Noticed via Gizmodo: New Li-Ion Batteries Charge 70 Percent in 2 Minutes, Last for 20 Years

"A team of researchers in Singapore have developed a next generation lithium-ion battery that can recharge a battery to 70-percent in just two minutes. That means it would charge an entire electric car in just 15 minutes. And here's the kicker: it lasts over 20 years.

Normally, it's safe to be skeptical about new battery technology, but there's something rather hopeful about this breakthrough. The new battery isn't altogether new. It's actually just an improvement upon existing lithium-ion technology."
 

Saghost

Well-Known Member
Oct 9, 2013
8,224
7,091
Delaware
Can you imagine the sort of raw power that would take? A 70% charge on 85 kWh is 60 kWh - and 1800 kW, which with the Tesla's 400V battery would be ~4500 Amps. I guess if they make it work in the wild, cars would have to go to much higher voltages to make the cabling at all practical.
Walter
 
okay, who will be mad when tesla eventually comes out with a better battery. The only way to pre-announce something like this:

"We will come out with a way better widget and it won't be sooner than 3 months from now.
Please stop buying our current model until then. Thanks!"

They'll probably throw in Tech Package and a couple other things for free at that point.
 
add to that "BTW, to use this feature, we'll need to locate an entire new set of SuperChargers, that are located near high voltage distribution substations. this rollout will take several years, as we negotiate with each local power company for colocation access"

oh sure, i can see that happening - not. same issue Rimac will have, if they ever manage to build anything.
 

Zapped

Model S - PURE EV
Aug 8, 2012
1,192
217
Work<->Home
Can you imagine the sort of raw power that would take? A 70% charge on 85 kWh is 60 kWh - and 1800 kW, which with the Tesla's 400V battery would be ~4500 Amps. I guess if they make it work in the wild, cars would have to go to much higher voltages to make the cabling at all practical.
Walter

Need to wirelessly transmit the power from the Ionosphere. Lots up there.
Power from Ionosphere.JPG


Check this out at 6:40
TESLA and the Ionosphere
 
Last edited:

Cosmacelf

Well-Known Member
Supporting Member
Mar 6, 2013
9,379
25,300
San Diego
Well, this research battery has been announced in a press release from the university. There is no technical information about it nor a published research paper.

Most importantly, what is the power density? If it is twice as heavy or twice the volume of Tesla's current battery, it isn't going to be useful.
 

Cosmacelf

Well-Known Member
Supporting Member
Mar 6, 2013
9,379
25,300
San Diego
So I did a bit of googling on titanium dioxide anodes. Researchers in the US have been trying to make useful batteries with this anode for many years. There was a flurry of reports around 2011 about the fast recharge time of this anode.

Anyways, given this is just a university press release, with no associated publications describing this technology, I would say this is far from being useful in a car...
 
(LMB spouse)

Or if it can only handle 50 recharge cycles, or costs ten times as much to manufacture, or if much more likely to burst into flame, or ...

I was just about to post about this but got beat to it. A few interesting quotes from the article:

" ... The new battery will be able to endure more than 10,000 charging cycles – 20 times more than the current 500 cycles of today's batteries....


.... NTU professor Rachid Yazami, who was the co-inventor of the lithium-graphite anode 34 years ago that is used in most lithium-ion batteries today, said Prof Chen's invention is the next big leap in battery technology. ...


.... Prof Chen expects that the new generation of fast-charging batteries will hit the market in two years' time."

Supposed to be very easy to integrate into current production processes using very common materials. But yes, no details on power density.

Could to be the real deal, but even if this isn't the next big thing, one of these breakthroughs will be. People who don't think that EVs are for real are just nuts! Just a matter of time.
 
The problem with all these revolutionary breakthroughs in battery tech, is that from this research stage, to actual production, is usually a minimum of 5-10 years (often longer), and in that time the current technology slowly improves too. The end result is that this revolutionary breakthrough, once it gets to production, is only marginally better than the existing technology at that time.

I'm certain that Tesla is keeping up with the major advances in battery technology (I remember that the initial description of the gigafactory included a research component as well) But in reality we'll see slow incremental improvements to the batteries we use, and no major giant leaps are likely any time soon. This isn't a bad thing, there is progress, it's just sometimes hard to notice it at the pace it really works at unless you take the time to look up and review history.
 

techmaven

Active Member
Feb 27, 2013
3,618
9,768
Lithium titanate nanotube cells... they look pretty promising with very high C rates for both charging and discharging. Possibly 8,000 or 10,000 cycle lifespan to 80% capacity. Sounds terrific. But specific energy numbers are very low and cost is very high. It makes more sense for hybrid vehicles that need small batteries and prize a high charge and discharge rate out of a small battery with long life. This chemistry will find applications in hybrids, very small battery PHEVs and stationary storage for before it becomes economical and practical for big battery BEVs.
 
Lithium titanate nanotube cells... they look pretty promising with very high C rates for both charging and discharging. Possibly 8,000 or 10,000 cycle lifespan to 80% capacity. Sounds terrific. But specific energy numbers are very low and cost is very high. It makes more sense for hybrid vehicles that need small batteries and prize a high charge and discharge rate out of a small battery with long life. This chemistry will find applications in hybrids, very small battery PHEVs and stationary storage for before it becomes economical and practical for big battery BEVs.

While the energy density might not be great for a Tesla battery immediately, I could see this as being useful as a grid storage battery due to the quick charge and discharge time...size would not be a major factor. I'm thinking of something like the storage battery at the Barstow super charger station.
 

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