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"New" Sources of Tesla 'OEM,' Tesla-like, and/or Third-Party CCS1 Adapters

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Due to information/product vacuums caused when Tesla allegedly stepped in and prevented further sales of Korean CCS1 adapters to North America (e.g., by helpful businesses like Harumio), several new potential sources of adapters originated in 2022.

September 21, 2022 Update: Tesla North America has (finally) released its CCS1 adapter to Canadian and U.S. customers. The adapter is available to all (four) Tesla models, provided cars are CCS-enabled. Hardware/software retrofits are (supposedly) coming in 2023 for cars currently without CCS capability.

December 26, 2023 news tidbits: (a) Still no Tesla-provided CCS hardware/software updates for non-CCS-compatible Models 3 & Y; but maybe as soon as next month (January 2024)? (b) As discussed elsewhere, the scheduled adoption, now by almost all electric car manufacturers, of the NACS (North American Charging Standard--i.e., the original 2012 Tesla Proprietary Standard plugs and ports) suggests that the CCS standard may (join CHAdeMO and) become a dying technology in North America in coming years. (c) A2Z, a Canadian firm partnering with Asian manufacturer Olink, is now offering the first (to my knowledge) working combined CCS1 (DC)-J1772 (AC) adapter.


"New" (in 2022) Sources of CCS1 Adapters
(Grouped by type.)
Source​
Price​
Specific Notes​
Availability
(in NA)​
Genuine Tesla Adapter
$250(US)
$175(US)
$250
$325(CAN)
$340(CAN)

$240(CAN)
$345(CAN)​
  • Available on the Canada and U.S. Tesla websites.
  • Owner's manual here.
  • For Models S, X, 3, and Y.
  • Car must be CCS-enabled.
  • February 2023 Update: Factory-approved hardware retrofits (including parts and labor) for non-CCS-enabled cars are now available for Models S and X. CCS hardware upgrades for North American Models 3 and Y (that need them) are expected in mid-2023.
  • For those who prefer not to wait, successful DIY (do-it-yourself) procedures to enable CCS charging in recent (e.g., certain 2021 cars) and in older vehicles (particularly Models 3 & Y) may be possible. See numerous postings, starting with this Thread.
AVAILABLE.
Tesla-Adapter Copies
$325
$294
$319
$250
$235
$246
$251
$239
$216
$230
$203
$175
$161
$132

$116.50
$119*​
  • Hansshow/Hautopart adapter may also be found on TesPlus website (for $200 $140).​
  • See website for technical specifications.​
  • Stated to be for Models S, X, 3, & Y (car must be CCS-enabled).​
AVAILABLE.
$250
$200
$170
$185
$180
$165
$155

$140​
  • See website for technical specifications.
  • Claimed to be compatible with "all Tesla models."
  • Car must be CCS-enabled.
  • Graphic imagery suggests that this may be a different product than the Hansshow/Hautopart adapter.
AVAILABLE.
Independently-designed Aftermarket Adapters
A2Z Shop
(Canada)​
$293
$270
$227
$195
$175

$150
$121*​
  • Brand name: "Thunderstorm Plug."
  • Combined CCS1 and J1772 adapter in one.
  • Sold by registered TMC vendor (information available via @A2ZEVSHOP)
  • See website for technical specifications.
  • Design and engineering input originated from this North American company with business ties to:
    • Manufacturer Huizhou Olink Technology Co., Ltd. (China)
  • Works with applicable Models S, Ǝ, X, and Y, but:
    • Car must be CCS-enabled.
  • Note #1: Website CCS1 price may vary slightly, probably due to fluctuating Canada-to-U.S.-dollar rates.
    Note #2: Other CCS1-related accessories (e.g., lock, case, ECU) are also available from A2Z Shop.
AVAILABLE.
In Development
-na-​
  • See website for more information.
  • In size and general shape, reminiscent of the original SETEC CCS1 adapter (see below).
  • Possible release in, when?--2024?
Currently
Unavailable.​
* Includes shipping to North America.

Current Aftermarket Adapters

Note: Adapter images are not to the same scale.​

Comments:
  • USE FOR AC J1772-PLUG CHARGING? - Some/all J1772 plugs can be inserted into the upper circular socket of many CCS1 adapters. This perpetuated the previous misconception that all CCS1 adapters could be used to accept J1772 plug-outfitted charging cables. That is still untrue. Most CCS1 adapters are exclusively for DC charging, while J1772 plugs are used for AC Level 2 charging.
    |
    However, there is news on this front: The latest A2Z Thunderstorm adapter will apparently handle both DC and AC charging. See that website for more information.
    |
    Meanwhile, the other CCS1 adapters listed in this post are (afaik) still not usable with any J1772 AC cable-plug device. So normally a CCS1 adapter is not necessary for AC charging (from 240v wall outlets and at Level 2 charging stations). TMC members have convincingly demonstrated (via photographs) that most other Tesla and aftermarket CCS1 adapters seen so far lack certain key electrical connectors necessary for AC J1772 charging (see here). Again, the A2Z adapter is apparently the exception. But for other CCS1 adapters, for a North American Tesla you can use AC charging equipment with J1772 plugs only with a proper J1772 adapter (now including the A2Z CCS1/J1772 adapter).

    Don't be misled--CCS1 adapters are NOT necessary for AC charging.



  • CHARGING LOCKS - Adapters designed for use in North American Tesla cars routinely come with a locking notch (at the bottom of the Tesla proprietary [TPC] plug that inserts into the charging port) that will prevent most unintended adapter-removal (i.e., theft) from the port during a charging session. Some manufacturers/suppliers are also addressing the second undesirable issue of having a CCS1 cable-plug/handle prematurely removed from the other end of the adapter during charging. See individual supplier webpages about any features designed to prevent undesired cable removal.

  • INTERNAL DESIGN - Most third-party CCS1 adapters appear to have a relatively simple straight "pass-through" circuitry design (with no or minimal amounts of solid-state circuitry components), as does the OEM Tesla adapter (I believe). The original SETEC adapter--with its battery-powered, CHAdeMO-mimicking software/hardware and 50kW charge rate maximum--is the notable exception.

  • CCS COMPATIBILITY - CCS1 adapters that lack on-board control circuitry (i.e., most/all adapters other than the original SETEC device) require that the car be "CCS-enabled." (In other words, some kind of CCS-allowing control electronics must be present inside either the adapter or the car.) In general, most Teslas from early 2020 to June 2021, and from November 2021 to present are so enabled; but check your car's CCS status before purchasing an adapter.
    • To check CCS status:
      • Center Touchscreen Display.
      • "Software" screen.
      • Choose "Additional Vehicle Information" link.
      • Examine "CCS adapter support" status. Status should appear as either "Enabled" or "Not installed."
    • If "Not installed" (CCS incompatible), owners of Models S and X can now purchase hardware/software updates from Tesla. There have also been DIY (do it yourself) workarounds for Models 3 and Y, or you can wait for Tesla to sell service retrofits for Models 3 and Y later in 2023 or maybe 2024.
      ...
  • ADVERTISED CHARGING RATES - For several reasons I am no longer reporting charging rate specifications; in part because the new (2022) adapters all claim a maximum charging rate of at least 150kW, up to 250kW (as does the Tesla OEM adapter).

    TMC Forum posts report widely varying charging rates for seemingly all CCS1 adapters (both Tesla and third-party). The reason is apparently that many conditions and factors--e.g., car model, age, and condition; the battery's initial charge level and temperature at the start of a charging session; and additional factors--may affect maximum and ongoing charging rates at any particular time. Clearly the design and condition/health of the particular charging station being used makes a difference (with variation even seen among charging stations of the same company and at particular stations on different days). Also important: exactly when a reading is taken during a charging session. Charging rates rise and fall naturally over the course of a full session (here is one example). When a car starts with a relatively low battery level (say at 20% capacity), a moderately-high start, followed by an aggressive ramp-up, and then a gradual decline is commonplace.

    Taking all this into account, a single charging rate index number may not be a particularly helpful (or honest) decision-making factor. Better, perhaps, would be a series of comparative charge-session graphs with conditions held relatively constant (e.g., 20%-to-80% charge sessions, batteries preconditioned to best operating temperatures, moderate ambient temperatures, use of the same charging station, etc.). Clearly we need someone like Tom Moloughney (YouTube "State of Charge" Channel) to objectively test, side-by-side, all the CCS1 adapter alternatives. In addition to comparative charge rates, I would also be interested in internal design, and build quality. (But I certainly do not want to dissect my own, or indeed any, precious CCS1 adapter to investigate.)

    It is still early days, but one (still untested, afaik) hypothesis is that adapters with straight "pass-through" circuitry designs (including the Tesla OEM device) will all perform in generally similar fashion given the same conditions. If that proves true, the choice of product then comes down to factors other than maximum rate of charge; such as build-quality, safety features, cost (and we are seeing aftermarket sellers actively match or undercut the Tesla adapter price), size and weight, availability, brand loyalty, purchase convenience, customer service, and so forth. I haven't looked inside an adapter, but I imagine that the size/bulk, design, and metallurgical content of electrical contacts and conductors may be important (e.g., for resistance and hence energy loss through heat). This is DC high-voltage fast-charging, so you want beefy components here, people. Consider the analogy of making a purchase choice from among various brands of NEMA 14-50 wall receptacles with different prices and/or construction/designs. They all work, but...(BUY HUBBELL!--or, even better yet, a Tesla or name brand wall connector.)

  • CAVEATS - Information (e.g., prices, descriptions) on some sites can change frequently and unexpectedly. Some initial products and websites are no more. Again, be cautious. After a long wait, adapters (and now CCS hardware upgrades for Models S & X) for are finally available from Tesla in North America. Therefore, many might now argue that the genuine CCS1 adapter (and factory hardware retrofits if needed) from Tesla in North America are the safest course. But will Tesla supplies be consistently adequate to meet demand? We'll see. (As of 03/26/23, Tesla's ongoing stock of CCS1 adapters apparently continues to be satisfactory.)

  • CURRENCY - Prices listed here are in US dollars.

  • CAUTION - Please note the alert (in red) at the bottom of this post.
    |
  • For drivers whose cars are still incompatible with most CCS1 adapters and who, for whatever reason, prefer not want to use the original SETEC/Lectron CCS1 adapter (below), Tesla/aftermarket CHAdeMO adapters are still sometimes available (used/new) (e.g., on Craig's List), and are are alternative source for DC charging at the remaining stations in North America. At about a maximum of about 50kW, performance is similar to the SETEC/Lectron CCS1 adapter but without the hassle of software update incompatibility. CHAdeMO adapters are somewhat bulky*, however.
    |
    Original Tesla Chademo Adapter (for North America)

    Tesla CHAdeMO Adapter
    |
  • Finally, with recent (2023) inroads by Tesla into having its proprietary charging standard become the so-called North American Charging Standard (NACS)--adopted by more and more manufacturers of electric cars sold in North America (latest count appears to show that almost all NA electric cars will adopt the NACS within a couple of years)--it is easy to envision a time in the near future when virtually all new and many modified NA electric battery-powered vehicles will use the simple AC/DC Tesla standard plugs and ports. If that happens, the CCS1 standard could conceivably become obsolete. For now, though, CCS1 adapters remain a worthy accessory for Tesla drivers who travel extensively.
_____
* @wk057 has a bench-top dissection of a CHAdeMO adapter here, showing all the control circuitry necessary (hence the CHAdeMO adapter's larger size, by the way).


Prior Sources of CCS1 Adapters
(In order of release?)

Source​
Price​
Specific Notes​
Adapter Type​
Availability
(in NA)​
$525​
  • Car must be "CCS-enabled."
  • Availability curtailed by Russia's war against Ukraine.
  • First available for sale in 2020.
"Aftermarket"
Straight "pass-
through" circuitry.​
Currently unavailable.​
$640
$300
  • Unlike other adapters here, charges at a 50kW maximum rate.
  • Requires onboard battery.
  • Runs off firmware that may require frequent updates.
  • Not always compatible with Tesla vehicle updates.
  • Can be used in any model; car need not be CCS-enabled.
  • First available (in North America) in late 2020.
"Aftermarket"
Hardware/software
used to mimic
CHAdeMO technology.​
AVAILABLE.
~$227 (US)​
  • See website (and use Google translate if necessary) for technical specifications.
  • Translation of owner's manual here.
  • Car must be "CCS enabled."
  • Ostensibly for Models 3/Y only (in actuality works with all CCS-enabled models).
  • Includes locking pin to help discourage unintended CCS1 cable-plug detachment.
  • Made for Tesla-Korea by Pegatron of Taiwan.
  • First available (in Korea) in 2021.
  • For a few months in 2022 was available to North American customers through selected Korean shopping/shipping businesses (e.g., Harumio).
"Tesla OEM"
Straight "pass-
through" circuitry.​
AVAILABLE
(in Korea).

Previous CCS1 Adapters

Disclosures and Alerts:
  • In 2022 I purchased two Tesla-Korea CCS1 adapters, along with aftermarket cases for those adapters, from Harumio in South Korea. (I found the process painless and convenient and staff there helpful and professional.) I paid the standard Harumio retail prices. I do not own, nor have I seen or handled, any of the other CCS1 adapters.

  • More importantly, I have not received, nor am I or will I be receiving any payment or compensation in any form whatsoever from any company or individual regarding CCS1 adapters (or for that matter any other Tesla- or auto-related issue). All opinions, right or wrong, offered in this post are my own.

  • The third-party CCS1 adapter market continues to be competitive. Product specifications and information (especially availability and prices) can evolve suddenly and unexpectedly as the market adjusts to recent events. Therefore, information included here may be in error or out-of-date. If you choose to purchase a third-party product, always check with the seller for the latest information and discounts before buying. As with other Tesla-applicable accessories, consumers now have a choice of factory or aftermarket products.
 
Last edited:
Due to information/product vacuums arguably caused when Tesla seemingly halted sales of Korean CCS1 adapters to North America (e.g., by helpful businesses like Harumio), several new potential sources of adapters have seemingly appeared out of nowhere. My impression is that they are all originating from manufacturing powerhouse China. I cannot claim to have spotted them all. And information, in some cases is sketchy, changing, or even seemingly contradictory. Some sources may be providing identical items, albeit at significantly different prices. (Auction sales [e.g., on eBay] may contain some of these products.) Frankly, some offers look TGTBT (too good to be true). Please comment and I will try to keep the table reasonable correct and up-to-date (unless things get out of control or until Tesla releases its adapter in North America).

"New" Sources of CCS1 Adapters
(no particular order)
Source​
Price​
Notes​
Adapter Type​
Availability (in NA)​
$280​
  • Apparently the Hansshow company?​
  • No specifications currently available?​
Looks like Tesla adapter.​
Late August?​
$304​
  • Voltage: 500-1000V
  • Current: 300A
  • Temperature Rating: -30ºC to 50ºC
  • Housing: Polyoxymethylene (POM)
  • Conductors: Titanium-copper alloy
  • Excess-Temperature Auto-Stop Charging Switch
  • Anti-theft lock
Similar to Ukrainian adapter?
No battery or firmware.​
Mid-August?​
$250​
  • to 150kW charging rate
  • Voltage: to 500V
  • Current: to 300A
  • Temperature Rating: -22ºF to 122ºF
  • Internal temperature monitoring and control
Looks like Tesla adapter.​
Available late October?​
CCS
$495​
  • Claims to be Tesla OEM part (Number 1656565-10-A)
  • Made by Pegatron Corporation for Tesla-Korea?
  • For Models 3 and Y
  • To 150kW charging rate
  • Voltage: to 500V
  • Current: to 300A
Looks like, and claims
to be exactly like,
the Tesla-Korea adapter.​
Available?​
$230
  • IP (Enclosure) Rating: 44
  • Voltage: 500V
  • Current: 150A
  • Charging Rate: 120-150kW
  • Temperature Rating: -30ºC to 50ºC
  • Housing: POM
  • Pin Metal: 99.56% Pure High Conductive Copper
  • Excess-Temperature Auto-Kill Switch
  • No locking pin
Similar to Ukrainian adapter?
No battery or firmware.
Made in China.​
Available.​
$319​
  • Claims to be Tesla OEM part
  • (Tesla) Model Number 1656565-10-A
  • Made by Pegatron Corporation for Tesla-Korea?
  • For Models 3 and Y
  • Voltage: to 500V
  • Current: to 300A
Looks like, and claims
to be exactly like,
the Tesla-Korea adapter.​
Available.​
-na-​
  • IP Rating: 54
  • Voltage: 100-500V
  • Current: 150A
  • Charging Rate: 120-150kW
  • Temperature Rating: -22ºF to 122ºF
Under development.​
Not yet available.​

This information is in no way a recommendation to buy anything. In fact, I urge caution. As I've said elsewhere, I personally feel uncomfortable with using anything but a genuine Tesla charging accessory for pumping high voltage into my precious vehicle. On the other hand, if some of these sources do, indeed, have the genuine Tesla-Korea (Pegatron) product (at a good price), then great. Will Tesla itself soon be offering the adapter to North American customers? Let's hope so.

Previous Sources of CCS1 Adapters

Source​
Price​
Notes​
Adapter Type​
Availability (in NA)​
~$239 (US)​
  • IP Rating: 44
  • Voltage: 500V
  • Current: 300A
  • Temperature Rating: -30ºC to 50ºC
  • Charges at 150kW and higher
  • Car must be "CCS enabled"
  • Ostensibly for Models 3/Y only (in reality works on all CCS-enabled models)
  • Uses locking pin to help discourage unintended detachment.
  • Made for Tesla-Korea by Pegatron of Taiwan.
Straight "pass-
through" circuitry.​
Currently unavailable.​
$640​
  • Charges at 50kW maximum rate
  • Requires onboard battery
  • Runs off firmware
  • May require frequent firmware updates
  • Not always compatible with Tesla vehicle updates
  • Can be used in any model
  • CCS compatibility not required
Hardware/software
used to mimic
CHAdeMO technology.​
Available.​
$525​
  • Current: 400A
  • Charges at 160kW and higher
  • Car must be "CCS-enabled"
Straight "pass-
through" circuitry.​
Currently unavailable.​
Great list. Thanks.
 
Great list. Thanks.

Thanks. Due to widely-varying prices and specifications, hopefully it will encourage people to stop, think, and maybe wait before sending hundreds of dollars to unknown sources. In the other hand, just a few months ago no one had heard of Harumio. The bottom line? Get it together, Tesla! Release an adapter to North America, already!
 
Thanks. Due to widely-varying prices and specifications, hopefully it will encourage people to stop, think, and maybe wait before sending hundreds of dollars to unknown sources. In the other hand, just a few months ago no one had heard of Harumio. The bottom line? Get it together, Tesla! Release an adapter to North America, already!
Agreed. We have a trip coming up where we need one so we took a chance and bought the A2Z unit. Works good. No regrets. But I can’t figure out why Tesla is not selling in North America.

Jmho.
 
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Due to information/product vacuums arguably caused when Tesla seemingly halted sales of Korean CCS1 adapters to North America (e.g., by helpful businesses like Harumio), several new potential sources of adapters have seemingly appeared out of nowhere. My impression is that they are all originating from manufacturing powerhouse China. I cannot claim to have spotted them all. And information, in some cases is sketchy, changing, or even seemingly contradictory. Some sources may be providing identical items, albeit at significantly different prices. (Auction sales [e.g., on eBay] may contain some of these products.) Frankly, some offers look TGTBT (too good to be true). Please comment and I will try to keep the table reasonable correct and up-to-date (unless things get out of control or until Tesla releases its adapter in North America).

"New" Sources of CCS1 Adapters
(no particular order)
Source​
Price​
Notes​
Adapter Type​
Availability (in NA)​
$280​
  • Apparently the Hansshow company?​
  • No specifications currently available?​
Looks like Tesla adapter.​
Late August?​
$304​
  • Voltage: 500-1000V
  • Current: 300A
  • Temperature Rating: -30ºC to 50ºC
  • Housing: Polyoxymethylene (POM)
  • Conductors: Titanium-copper alloy
  • Excess-Temperature Auto-Stop Charging Switch
  • Anti-theft lock
Similar to Ukrainian adapter?
No battery or firmware.​
Mid-August?​
$250​
  • to 150kW charging rate
  • Voltage: to 500V
  • Current: to 300A
  • Temperature Rating: -22ºF to 122ºF
  • Internal temperature monitoring and control
Looks like Tesla adapter.​
Available late October?​
CCS
$495​
  • Claims to be Tesla OEM part (Number 1656565-10-A)
  • Made by Pegatron Corporation for Tesla-Korea?
  • For Models 3 and Y
  • To 150kW charging rate
  • Voltage: to 500V
  • Current: to 300A
Looks like, and claims
to be exactly like,
the Tesla-Korea adapter.​
Available?​
$230
  • IP (Enclosure) Rating: 44
  • Voltage: 500V
  • Current: 150A
  • Charging Rate: 120-150kW
  • Temperature Rating: -30ºC to 50ºC
  • Housing: POM
  • Pin Metal: 99.56% Pure High Conductive Copper
  • Excess-Temperature Auto-Kill Switch
  • No locking pin
Similar to Ukrainian adapter?
No battery or firmware.
Made in China.​
Available.​
$319​
  • Claims to be Tesla OEM part
  • (Tesla) Model Number 1656565-10-A
  • Made by Pegatron Corporation for Tesla-Korea?
  • For Models 3 and Y
  • Voltage: to 500V
  • Current: to 300A
Looks like, and claims
to be exactly like,
the Tesla-Korea adapter.​
Available.​
-na-​
  • IP Rating: 54
  • Voltage: 100-500V
  • Current: 150A
  • Charging Rate: 120-150kW
  • Temperature Rating: -22ºF to 122ºF
Under development.​
Not yet available.​

This information is in no way a recommendation to buy anything. In fact, I urge caution. As I've said elsewhere, I personally feel uncomfortable with using anything but a genuine Tesla charging accessory for pumping high voltage into my precious vehicle. On the other hand, if some of these sources do, indeed, have the genuine Tesla-Korea (Pegatron) product (at a good price), then great. Will Tesla itself soon be offering the adapter to North American customers? Let's hope so.

Previous Sources of CCS1 Adapters

Source​
Price​
Notes​
Adapter Type​
Availability (in NA)​
~$239 (US)​
  • IP Rating: 44
  • Voltage: 500V
  • Current: 300A
  • Temperature Rating: -30ºC to 50ºC
  • Charges at 150kW and higher
  • Car must be "CCS enabled"
  • Ostensibly for Models 3/Y only (in reality works on all CCS-enabled models)
  • Uses locking pin to help discourage unintended detachment.
  • Made for Tesla-Korea by Pegatron of Taiwan.
Straight "pass-
through" circuitry.​
Currently unavailable.​
$640​
  • Charges at 50kW maximum rate
  • Requires onboard battery
  • Runs off firmware
  • May require frequent firmware updates
  • Not always compatible with Tesla vehicle updates
  • Can be used in any model
  • CCS compatibility not required
Hardware/software
used to mimic
CHAdeMO technology.​
Available.​
$525​
  • Current: 400A
  • Charges at 160kW and higher
  • Car must be "CCS-enabled"
Straight "pass-
through" circuitry.​
Currently unavailable.​
Thanks for creating this list! I contacted CCS to see if the adapters are in stock.

They replied and said “The Tesla manufacturer is back-ordered for CCS adapters, and the shipment will go out for another two weeks.”
 
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Reactions: julit0
I think it’s important to mention that Harumio seems to have managed a way to copy A2Z’s adapter. When I looks at A2Z EV SHOP instagram page, they started advertising their adapter the 7th of July of this year. I don’t think it’s logic we support an overseas company over a an North American company. Some of you are going to say too bad, they needed to make a patent for this not to happen. I know you’re right. But Harumio knows what about electronics? They know what about Tesla’s? Are we waiting until we get some crap adapters on the market that could hurt our children, our wives or husbands? This is catastrophic. They have no video whatsoever, no pictures, no testings. NOTHING.

This is getting out of hands for the sake of what? Having more options or cheaper rates? I’m not sacrificing the reliability of my car or safety of my fellow Tesla owners for some adapter without any prior testings or background.
Harumio helped us with OFFICIAL Tesla adapters and I was one of their customers. They got it from Tesla SK, the real company. They are selling mangas, Kpop and Kdrama things nothing else.

I may need a Snicker lol but we aren’t driving old 99 Toyota Corollas with aftermarket xenons. Can we stop supporting any company that has no background and no real life testings on their products.

When the day a Tesla is going to burn because we bought an adapter that haven’t been tested we’re all going to regret it. I like Harumio they helped us with the OEM thing but that’s it. I will support any other company that brings to us tested and safe products. Not just A2Z.
 

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Soom is another Korean forwarder almost exactly like Harumio. It uses your Tesla account to order. If Harumio can no longer do this (due to shutdown by Tesla) then Soom will face such a shutdown soon enough, but may be escaping it by using different addresses and credit cards. They might be able to play whac-a-mole opening up new drop addresses and new credit cards or they might not.

I suspect there are not too many makers of the clone adapter without the locking pin, but various resellers.

It is entirely unknown how or if "CCS" is getting official Tesla adapters. It does seem odd when nobody else has a line on them except through Tesla Korea, one per car. But will be interesting to see. Lectron has long experience with adapters of course (presumably made in China) and seems to have arranged for a new one, different from the no-locking-pin model, if you can wait.

But if you can wait, since the official adapter sells in Korea for $220 before VAT, it is pretty likely it will sell for $200 in the USA, when Tesla deigns to sell it, so I am not sure how well all these aftermarket adapters will survive competing with that. They have to hope Tesla will keep waiting to release it in NA. They are motivated not to make too many, or if they make a lot, they will need to sell them for $150 or less at that point, and even then, people might be reluctant when you have people like EVgo saying they don't "allow" non-OEM adapters at their stations. Of course, they have no way to really stop it.
 
But if you can wait, since the official adapter sells in Korea for $220 before VAT, it is pretty likely it will sell for $200 in the USA, when Tesla deigns to sell it, so I am not sure how well all these aftermarket adapters will survive competing with that. They have to hope Tesla will keep waiting to release it in NA. They are motivated not to make too many, or if they make a lot, they will need to sell them for $150 or less at that point, and even then, people might be reluctant when you have people like EVgo saying they don't "allow" non-OEM adapters at their stations. Of course, they have no way to really stop it.

The thing is, Tesla couldn't even keep its mobile connector in stock today. When CHAdeMO adaptor was available, it was out of stock most of the time so there will be plenty of room for aftermarket vendors to sell these adaptors.
 
I think it’s important to mention that Harumio seems to have managed a way to copy A2Z’s adapter.
I haven't been able to spot any differences between the two adapters, based on photos. Somebody posted in another thread that both are made in China -- note that, although A2Z is based in Canada and there's a "designed in North America" logo on the A2Z site, the place of manufacture is not stated. Thus, my suspicion is that A2Z contracted with a manufacturer in China to do the actual manufacturing, and that manufacturer has decided to sell the product independently via Harumio. That's just a guess, though; it could be that another company cloned the Chinese factory's product, or something else entirely might be going on. As I understand it, manufacturing in China is a real "wild west" sort of environment, particularly when it comes to local markets or products made for small companies that lack the clout to prevent cloning.

If I'm right that the Harumio and A2Z adapters come from the same factory and are identical, then you can certainly save a few bucks by buying from Harumio, with no loss of quality; but if A2Z's claim that they designed it is correct, then doing so means you'll be cutting the designer out of their share of income. Personally, I'd buy from A2Z on that principle alone.
 
I haven't been able to spot any differences between the two adapters, based on photos. Somebody posted in another thread that both are made in China -- note that, although A2Z is based in Canada and there's a "designed in North America" logo on the A2Z site, the place of manufacture is not stated. Thus, my suspicion is that A2Z contracted with a manufacturer in China to do the actual manufacturing, and that manufacturer has decided to sell the product independently via Harumio. That's just a guess, though; it could be that another company cloned the Chinese factory's product, or something else entirely might be going on. As I understand it, manufacturing in China is a real "wild west" sort of environment, particularly when it comes to local markets or products made for small companies that lack the clout to prevent cloning.

If I'm right that the Harumio and A2Z adapters come from the same factory and are identical, then you can certainly save a few bucks by buying from Harumio, with no loss of quality; but if A2Z's claim that they designed it is correct, then doing so means you'll be cutting the designer out of their share of income. Personally, I'd buy from A2Z on that principle alone.
It may be just me but I don’t think the A2Z looks anything like the Harumio version. Or maybe I’m looking at the wrong adapter. I don’t have a good picture of our A2Z handy (I’ll get one tomorrow) but it is a different shape….I think.

This is the only close up I have on the phone.
AFB0BD21-FA09-4157-B775-63F5CB5BBEDD.jpeg
 
I haven't been able to spot any differences between the two adapters, based on photos. Somebody posted in another thread that both are made in China -- note that, although A2Z is based in Canada and there's a "designed in North America" logo on the A2Z site, the place of manufacture is not stated. Thus, my suspicion is that A2Z contracted with a manufacturer in China to do the actual manufacturing, and that manufacturer has decided to sell the product independently via Harumio. That's just a guess, though; it could be that another company cloned the Chinese factory's product, or something else entirely might be going on. As I understand it, manufacturing in China is a real "wild west" sort of environment, particularly when it comes to local markets or products made for small companies that lack the clout to prevent cloning.

If I'm right that the Harumio and A2Z adapters come from the same factory and are identical, then you can certainly save a few bucks by buying from Harumio, with no loss of quality; but if A2Z's claim that they designed it is correct, then doing so means you'll be cutting the designer out of their share of income. Personally, I'd buy from A2Z on that principle alone.
Amazing analogy. I like reading complete answers from people in this community. Saving a few bucks yes, but i think that if you have any issues or that your adapter stops workings, A2Z is the best solution for troubleshooting as they have a phone number and as they say experts that take calls. I’m sorry but having to wait days to get a response or an answer over email because they’re not sure and they have to ask supplier or supervisor is not an option for me. If I’m stuck in the middle of nowhere and my adapter is not working because I haven’t done something properly and need help, I wouldn’t wait for them to wakeup and send me an email LOL.

According to what I heard they have no inventory (harumio) right now.
 
Amazing analogy. I like reading complete answers from people in this community. Saving a few bucks yes, but i think that if you have any issues or that your adapter stops workings, A2Z is the best solution for troubleshooting as they have a phone number and as they say experts that take calls. I’m sorry but having to wait days to get a response or an answer over email because they’re not sure and they have to ask supplier or supervisor is not an option for me. If I’m stuck in the middle of nowhere and my adapter is not working because I haven’t done something properly and need help, I wouldn’t wait for them to wakeup and send me an email LOL.

According to what I heard they have no inventory (harumio) right now.
Yep. And A2Z definitely answers their phone, and they call you back. And they communicate in French and English.
 
I'm guessing this is the one Harumio is sourcing


Whether the A2Z one is the same is unclear. The manufacturer does notably allow for a custom logo with a sufficiently large order. One of the pictures they show in the listing is in fact an A2Z picture
 
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I'm guessing this is the one Harumio is sourcing


Whether the A2Z one is the same is unclear. The manufacturer does notably allow for a custom logo with a sufficiently large order. One of the pictures they show in the listing is in fact an A2Z picture
I think I just figured out what is happening. What your saying is Harumio is sourcing a different adapter. Not the OEM Tesla. Is that correct?
 
Harumio used to resell the Tesla adapters. Tesla seems to have blocked them. They are now apparently selling 3rd party adapters. But they weren't dishonest about it - it's a separate listing altogether that identifies itself as 3rd party. Some people seem to suspect that they ripped of A2Z's design... but it's looking like it might be that they're both just sourcing from the same manufacturer
 
I'm guessing this is the one Harumio is sourcing


Whether the A2Z one is the same is unclear. The manufacturer does notably allow for a custom logo with a sufficiently large order. One of the pictures they show in the listing is in fact an A2Z picture
Seeing that picture under the supplier’s listing with A2Z’s logo proves to me a lot of things. More in a way that A2Z is indeed behind the design and conception. The supplier would not advertise their name is they were only a simple buyer. That’s my opinion
 
...What your saying is Harumio is sourcing a different adapter. Not the OEM Tesla. Is that correct?

Harumio used to resell the Tesla adapters. Tesla seems to have blocked them. They are now apparently selling 3rd party adapters. But they weren't dishonest about it - it's a separate listing altogether that identifies itself as 3rd party. Some people seem to suspect that they ripped of A2Z's design... but it's looking like it might be that they're both just sourcing from the same manufacturer

I'm guessing this is the one Harumio is sourcing


Whether the A2Z one is the same is unclear. The manufacturer does notably allow for a custom logo with a sufficiently large order. One of the pictures they show in the listing is in fact an A2Z picture

All that sounds right.

Disclosure: This year I've purchased two Tesla OEM adapters and some adapter cases from Harumio. When Tesla-Korea halted sales by Harumio to North American customers, Harumio contacted me (and other customers, I'm sure) about the possibility of testing Chinese-made aftermarket adapters*. Basically, Harumio was looking for a way to fill what I'm sure was a looming sales gap for its remaining North American Tesla customers. Nothing wrong with that, imo. Apparently, the ones on the Alibab.com page may be them. However, I remain unsure whether the A2Z Shop adapters are exactly the same, or an upgraded version (with somewhat more expensive components and a higher price tag)? For me it does not matter. Others can investigate that.

Meanwhile, in the absence of any conrary evidence, I remain convinced that Harumio has acted reasonably and in the best interest of (a) its business and (b) its customers. From what I can see, many of us owe them a debt of gratitude for providing what proved to be a safe, speedy method to purchase an otherwise unavailable and genuine Tesla product. At the same time, I fully respect the opinions of others to purchase elsewhere or to wait for the (tardy) Tesla Corporation to release adapters in North America.

Finally, if I understand correctly, Alibaba.com displays manufactured products for sale to middleman businesses at wholesale prices, correct? If so, is an eventual retail markup from $139 to, say, $239-$300 considered excessive, or is it in line with standard business practices (necessary to cover overhead in order to make a reasonable profit)?

Cheers.
_____
* For various reasons I choose not to test an aftermarket adapter. (Just one reason: no safety lock on the early versions.) So I cannot comment on their quality or performance.
 
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If so, is an eventual retail markup from $139 to, say, $239-$300 considered excessive, or is it in line with standard business practices (necessary to cover overhead in order to make a reasonable profit)?
100% markup is pretty traditional, but I'm not sure if it's fully justified. As a reseller, you've got to
* Put up the purchase money early, and then sit there and "suck it" when it takes 6 months to actually cross the ocean. Assuming 10% APR on your loan, implies 5% carrying costs.
* Run a retail sales operation, dealing with chargeback risk and fraud risk from your customers. I assume squarespace, who wants ~3% and I think Stripe would take another 3% on top?
* Store the inventory
* Unpack and ship. Shipping is gonna be ~$10-$40 for something like this. $10 is USPS's box rate (7%?). Also figure ~30m-1h to repackage and ship, depending on volume. $15/hour of labor implies another $7.5 in fulfillment per order. On a $150 item, that's ~5%.
* Support & Returns. Someone bought it for their model-3 that didn't actually support CCS and now you've got to make that right. Maybe 5% of people return it, costing you 10% total?
* Paying yourself?

~35% markup seems like it would lose money...so I understand where the 100% markup baseline would come from.