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"New" Sources of Tesla 'OEM,' Tesla-like, and/or Third-Party CCS1 Adapters

Due to information/product vacuums caused when Tesla allegedly stepped in and prevented further sales of Korean CCS1 adapters to North America (e.g., by helpful businesses like Harumio), several new potential sources of adapters originated in 2022.

September 21, 2022 Update: Tesla North America has (finally) released the CCS1 adapter to its Canadian and U.S. customers. The adapter is available to all (four) Tesla models, provided cars are CCS-enabled. Hardware/software retrofits are coming in 2023 for cars currently without CCS capability.


"New" (in 2022) Sources of CCS1 Adapters
(Grouped by type.)
Source​
Price​
Specific Notes​
Availability
(in NA)​
Genuine Tesla Adapter
$250(US)
$325(CAN)
$340(CAN)​
  • Available on the Canada and U.S. Tesla websites.
  • Owner's manual here.
  • For Models S, X, 3, and Y.
  • Car must be CCS-enabled.
  • Factory-approved retrofits (including parts and labor) for non-enabled cars is coming (in 2023).
  • For those who prefer not to wait, successful DIY (do-it-yourself) procedures to enable CCS charging in recent (e.g., certain 2021 cars) and in older vehicles (particularly Models 3 & Y) may be possible. See numerous postings, starting with this Thread.
AVAILABLE.
Tesla-Adapter Copies
$325
$294
$319
$250
$235
$246
$251
$239
$216
$230

$203*​
  • Hansshow/Hautopart adapter may also be found on TesPlus website (for $200).​
  • See website for technical specifications.​
  • Stated to be for Models S, X, 3, & Y (car must be CCS-enabled).​
AVAILABLE.
$250
$200
$170

$185​
  • See website for technical specifications.
  • Claimed to be compatible with "all Tesla models."
  • Car must be CCS-enabled.
  • Graphic imagery suggests that this may be a different product than the Hansshow/Hautopart adapter.
AVAILABLE.
Independently-designed Aftermarket Adapters
$293
$270
$227

$195*​
  • Brand name: "Thunderstorm Plug."
  • Sold by registered TMC vendor (information available via @A2ZEVSHOP)
  • See website for technical specifications.
  • Design and engineering input originated from this North American company with business ties to:
    • Manufacturer Huizhou Olink Technology Co., Ltd. (China)
  • Works with applicable Models S, Ǝ, X, and Y, but:
    • Car must be CCS-enabled.
  • Note #1: Website CCS1 price may vary slightly, probably due to fluctuating Canada-to-U.S.-dollar rates.
    Note #2: Other CCS1-related accessories (e.g., lock, case, ECU) are also available from A2Z Shop.
AVAILABLE.
In Development
-na-​
  • See website for more information.
  • In size and general shape, reminiscent of the original SETEC CCS1 adapter (see below).
  • Possible release in 2023?
Currently
Unavailable.​
* Includes shipping to North America.

Existing 2022 and Planned Adapters

Note: Adapter images are not to the same scale.​

Comments:
  • USE FOR AC J1772-PLUG CHARGING? - Unfortunately, (some/all) J1772 plugs can be inserted into the upper circular socket of CCS1 adapters. This perpetuated the misconception (among some) that CCS1 adapters could be used to accept J1772 plug-outfitted charging cables. Untrue. CCS1 adapters are exclusively for DC charging. In contrast, J1772 plugs are used for AC Levl 2 charging. I surmise that none of the CCS1 adapters listed in this post are usable with any J1772 AC cable-plug device. No CCS1 adapter is necessary for AC charging (from 240v wall outlets and at Level 2 charging stations). TMC members have convincingly demonstrated (via photographs) that Tesla and aftermarket CCS1 adapters seen so far lack certain key electrical connectors necessary for AC J1772 charging (see here). For a North American Tesla, you can use charging equipment with J1772 plugs only with a proper J1772 adapter.

    Don't be misled--CCS1 adapters are NOT necessary for AC charging.



  • CHARGING LOCKS - Adapters designed for use in North American Tesla cars routinely come with a locking notch (at the bottom of the Tesla proprietary [TPC] plug that inserts into the charging port) that will prevent most unintended adapter-removal (i.e., theft) from the port during a charging session. Some manufacturers/suppliers are also addressing the second undesirable issue of having a CCS1 cable-plug/handle prematurely removed from the other end of the adapter during charging. See individual supplier webpages about any features designed to prevent undesired cable removal.

  • INTERNAL DESIGN - Most third-party CCS1 adapters appear to have a relatively simple straight "pass-through" circuitry design (with no or minimal amounts of solid-state circuitry components), as does the OEM Tesla adapter (I believe). The original SETEC adapter--with its battery-powered, CHAdeMO-mimicing software/hardware and 50kW charge rate maximum--is the notable exception.

  • CCS COMPATIBILITY - CCS1 adapters that lack on-board control circuitry (i.e., most/all adapters other than the original SETEC device) require that the car be "CCS-enabled." (In other words, some kind of CCS-allowing control electronics must be present inside either the adapter or the car.) In general, most Teslas from early 2020 to June 2021, and from November 2021 to present are so enabled; but check your car's CCS status before purchasing an adapter.
    • To check CCS status:
      • Center Touchscreen Display.
      • "Software" screen.
      • Choose "Additional Vehicle Information" link.
      • Examine "CCS adapter support" status. Status should appear as either "Enabled" or "Not installed."
    • If "Not installed" (CCS incompatible), there may be DIY (do it yourself) workarounds, or you can wait for Tesla to sell service retrofits (as was done in Europe for CCS2 adapters there).
      ...
  • ADVERTISED CHARGING RATES - For several reasons I am no longer reporting charging rate specifications; in part because the new (2022) adapters all claim a maximum charging rate of at least 150kW, up to 250kW (as does the Tesla OEM adapter).

    TMC Forum posts report widely varying charging rates for seemingly all CCS1 adapters (both Tesla and third-party). The reason is apparently that many conditions and factors--e.g., car model, age, and condition; the battery's initial charge level and temperature at the start of a charging session; and additional factors--may affect maximum and ongoing charging rates. Clearly the design and condition/health of the particular charging station being used makes a difference (with variation even seen among charging stations of the same company and at particular stations on different days). Also important: exactly when a reading is taken during a charging session. Charging rates rise and fall naturally over the course of a full session (here is one example). When a car starts with a relatively low battery level (say at 20% capacity), a moderately-high start, followed by an aggressive ramp-up, and then a gradual decline to completion is not unusual.

    Taking all this into account, a single charging rate index number may not be a particularly helpful (or honest) decision-making factor. Better, perhaps, would be a series of comparative charge-session graphs with conditions held relatively constant (e.g., 20%-to-80% charge sessions, batteries preconditioned to best operating temperatures, moderate ambient temperatures, use of the same charging station, etc.). Clearly we need someone like Tom Moloughney (YouTube "State of Charge" Channel) to objectively test, side-by-side, all the CCS1 adapter alternatives. In addition to comparative charge rates, I would also be interested in internal design, and build quality. (But I certainly do not want to dissect* my own, or indeed any, precious CCS1 adapter to investigate.)

    It is still early days, but one (still untested, afaik) hypothesis is that adapters with straight "pass-through" circuitry designs (including the Tesla OEM device) will all perform in generally similar fashion given the same conditions. If that proves true, the choice of product then comes down to factors other than maximum rate of charge; such as build-quality, safety features, cost, size and weight, availability, brand loyalty, purchase convenience, customer service, and so forth. I haven't looked inside an adapter, but I imagine that the size/bulk, design, and metallurgical content of electrical contacts and conductors will prove to be important (e.g., for resistance and hence energy loss through heat). This is DC high-voltage fast-charging, so you want beefy components here, people. Consider the analogy of purchase of a NEMA 14-50 wall receptacle from among several brands with different prices and/or construction/designs. They all work, but...

  • CAVEATS - Information (e.g., prices, descriptions) on some sites can change frequently and unexpectedly. Some initial products--and even one website--are no more. Again, be cautious. After a long wait, adapters are finally available from Tesla in North America. Therefore, many might now argue that the genuine CCS1 adapter (and factory hardware retrofits needed for some cars) from Tesla in North America are the safest course. But will Tesla supplies be consistently adequate to meet demand? We'll see. (As of 11/21/22, Tesla's ongoing stock of CCS1 adapters apparently continues to be satisfactory.)

  • CURRENCY - Prices listed here are in US dollars.

  • CAUTION - Please note the alert (in red) at the bottom of this post.
_____
* @wk057 has a bench-top dissection of a CHAdeMO adapter here, showing all the control circuitry necessary (hence the CHAdeMO adapter's larger size, by the way).


Prior Sources of CCS1 Adapters
(In order of release?)

Source​
Price​
Specific Notes​
Adapter Type​
Availability
(in NA)​
$525​
  • Car must be "CCS-enabled."
  • Availability curtailed by Russia-Ukraine war.
  • First available for sale in 2020.
"Aftermarket"
Straight "pass-
through" circuitry.​
Currently unavailable.​
$640
  • Unlike other adapters here, charges at a 50kW maximum rate.
  • Requires onboard battery.
  • Runs off firmware that may require frequent updates.
  • Not always compatible with Tesla vehicle updates.
  • Can be used in any model; car need not be CCS-enabled.
  • First available (in North America) in late 2020.
"Aftermarket"
Hardware/software
used to mimic
CHAdeMO technology.​
AVAILABLE.
~$239 (US)​
  • See website (and use Google translate if necessary) for technical specifications.
  • Translation of owner's manual here.
  • Car must be "CCS enabled."
  • Ostensibly for Models 3/Y only (in actuality works with all CCS-enabled models).
  • Includes locking pin to help discourage unintended CCS1 cable-plug detachment.
  • Made for Tesla-Korea by Pegatron of Taiwan.
  • First available (in Korea) in 2021.
  • For a few months in 2022 was available to North American customers through selected Korean shopping/shipping businesses (e.g., Harumio).
"Tesla OEM"
Straight "pass-
through" circuitry.​
AVAILABLE
(in Korea).

Previous CCS1 Adapters

Disclosures and Alerts:
  • In 2022 I purchased two Tesla-Korea CCS1 adapters, along with aftermarket cases for those adapters, from Harumio in South Korea. (I found the process painless and convenient and staff there helpful and professional.) I paid the standard Harumio retail prices. I do not own, nor have I seen or handled, any of the other CCS1 adapters.

  • More importantly, I have not received, nor am I or will I be receiving any payment or compensation in any form whatsoever from any company or individual regarding CCS1 adapters (or for that matter any other Tesla- or auto-related issue). All opinions, right or wrong, offered in this post are my own.

  • The third-party CCS1 adapter market continues to be competitive. Product specifications and information (especially availability and prices) can evolve suddenly and unexpectedly as the market adjusts to recent events. Therefore, information included here may be in error or out-of-date. If you choose to purchase a third-party product, always check with the seller for the latest information and discounts before buying. As with other Tesla-applicable accessories, consumers now have a choice of factory or aftermarket products.
 
Last edited:

terranx

Member
Aug 29, 2019
793
1,142
USA
With all due respect, I completely disagree. It’s not because a company helped us with OEM that they have right in every aspect of business. They were the only ones that could do what they did since the adapter was exclusive to SK. Now, I did speak with the supplier as my husband speaks mandarin and indeed A2Z helped the supplier with a lot of things. Harumio will deny as much as they can, they are the customer and they will never admit anything as they want most of the sales. How do I see Harumio? They are opportunists and they are trying to make some quick money by selling a product without any specifications, without any support of what they are claiming that adapter can make. It’s not because they sold you an OEM adapter straight from Tesla Shop that anything else is good to go.
I hate that this thread has became a comparison of A2Z and Harumio. The listing indeed presents the A2Z logo. The supplier would not list their logo if they haven’t been useful in any way. There are Tesla’s in China trust me. I paid more for A2Z, not only for the product but with the service that comes with it. They called me back then to let me know there is a delay, then called me personally again letting me know that my package has left. They offer a free replacement warranty that’s standard, that means that if my adapter stops working I’ll get a new one free of charge. Nowadays, it is important to note that customer service is the most important thing.

Now can we stop comparing both companies and talk about the actual product? To each his preferences. I’m finishing my full review on A2Z with pictures, data and timeline. I will post later this week.

@tps5352 dont take personal all that I said, I have been reading for the past days the forum and it almost seems like a war to me. Plus, I don’t like the fact that because a company has a certain status they could simply put a picture of a product and sell it. Especially for our cars, we need pictures, videos, proofs, data and background. It’s not an iPhone charger. That’s all.
Anyone else find it odd that a brand new account has only posted about the A2Z adapter (which itself was pretty much an unknown company prior) and is attacking a vendor that sells a competing product for less money?

This account is similar too: mbianchi

Recent registration, only posts made have been about A2Z's adapter. Similarly aggressive language when discussing a competing product.

Smells like astroturfing to me
 
Due to information/product vacuums caused when Tesla apparently killed sales of Korean CCS1 adapters to North America (e.g., by helpful businesses like Harumio), several new potential sources of adapters have recently come to light.

"New" Sources of CCS1 Adapters
(in no particular order)
Source​
Price​
Notes​
Adapter Type​
Availability (in NA)​
$280​
  • Apparently the Hansshow company?​
  • To 150kW​
  • Voltage to 500V​
  • Current to 300A​
  • Operating temperatures -22ºF to 122ºF​
  • Car must be CCS-enabled​
"Tesla-like"
Based on photos looks
exactly like Tesla adapter.​
Late August?​
$301​
  • To 150kW
  • Voltage: 500-1000V
  • Current: 300A
  • Temperature Rating: -30ºC to 50ºC
  • Housing: Polyoxymethylene (POM)
  • Conductors: Titanium-copper alloy
  • Excess-Temperature Auto-Stop Charging Switch
  • Anti-theft lock
  • Car must be CCS-enabled
"Aftermarket"
Similar to Ukrainian adapter?
No battery or firmware.​
Mid-August?​
$250​
  • Charging rate: to 150kW
  • Voltage: to 500V
  • Current: to 300A
  • Temperature Rating: -22ºF to 122ºF
  • Internal temperature monitoring and control
"Tesla-like"
Looks exactly like
Tesla adapter.​
Available late October?​
$495​
  • Claims to be Tesla OEM part (Number 1656565-10-A)
  • Made by Pegatron Corporation for Tesla-Korea?
  • For Models 3 and Y
  • Vehicle must be CCS-enabled
  • Charging rate: to 150kW
  • Voltage: to 500V
  • Current: to 300A
"Tesla OEM"
Looks like, and claims
to be exactly like,
the Tesla-Korea adapter.​
Available in
late-August?​
$230
  • IP (Enclosure) Rating: 44
  • Voltage: 500V
  • Current: 150A
  • Charging Rate: 120-150kW
  • Temperature Rating: -30ºC to 50ºC
  • Housing: POM
  • Pin Metal: 99.56% Pure High Conductive Copper
  • Excess-Temperature Auto-Kill Switch
  • No locking pin
"Aftermarket"
Similar to Ukrainian adapter?
No battery or firmware.
Made in China.​
Available
now?​
$319​
  • Claims to be Tesla OEM part
  • (Tesla) Model Number 1656565-10-A
  • Made by Pegatron Corporation for Tesla-Korea?
  • For Models 3 and Y
  • Voltage: to 500V
  • Current: to 300A
  • Customers must provide Tesla login account information
"Tesla OEM"
Looks like, and claims
to be exactly like,
the Tesla-Korea adapter.​
Available
now?​
-na-​
  • IP Rating: 54
  • Voltage: 100-500V
  • Current: 150A
  • Charging Rate: 120-150kW
  • Temperature Rating: -22ºF to 122ºF
"Aftermarket"
Under development.​
Available late-2022
or early-2023?​

This information is in no way a recommendation to buy anything. In fact, based on the comparative information provided here, I urge caution. With this plethora of new sources, it seems somewhat like the 'Wild West' out there, in terms of CCS1 adapters. A couple of claims even sound TGTBT (too good to be true). (Not saying they aren't true; just unsure and cautiously skeptical.)

As I've said elsewhere, I personally feel uncomfortable with using anything but a genuine Tesla charging accessory for pumping high voltage into my precious vehicle. On the other hand, if some of these sources do, indeed, offer the equivalent of the genuine Tesla-Korea (Pegatron) product (at a good price), then great! Meanwhile, will Tesla itself soon be offering the adapter to North American customers? Let's hope so.

Prior Sources of CCS1 Adapters

Source​
Price​
Notes​
Adapter Type​
Availability (in NA)​
~$239 (US)​
  • IP Rating: 44
  • Voltage: 500V
  • Current: 300A
  • Temperature Rating: -30ºC to 50ºC
  • Charges at 150kW and higher
  • Car must be "CCS enabled"
  • Ostensibly for Models 3/Y only (in reality works with all CCS-enabled models)
  • Uses locking pin to help discourage unintended detachment.
  • Made for Tesla-Korea by Pegatron of Taiwan.
  • For a few months in 2022 was available to North American customers through selected Korean shopping/shipping businesses
"Tesla OEM"
Straight "pass-
through" circuitry.​
Currently unavailable.​
$640​
  • First retail CCS1 adapter available to North American customers
  • Charges at 50kW maximum rate
  • Requires onboard battery
  • Runs off firmware
  • May require frequent firmware updates
  • Not always compatible with Tesla vehicle updates
  • Can be used in any model
  • CCS compatibility not required
"Aftermarket"
Hardware/software
used to mimic
CHAdeMO technology.​
Available
now.​
$525​
  • Current: 400A
  • Charges at 160kW and higher
  • Car must be "CCS-enabled"
  • Availability curtailed by Russia-Ukraine war
"Aftermarket"
Straight "pass-
through" circuitry.​
Currently unavailable.​
I ordered a Canadian one hope it works
 
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tps5352

Active Member
Supporting Member
As the author of the OP I feel I should briefly step in and emphasize/reiterate/restate/make clear some things at this point:
  1. The intent of the OP was to tabulate new (to me) sources of CCS1 adapters, and to thereby provide simple, comparative information that might help readers make good basic decisions (e.g., whether to buy, what to buy, whether to wait, etc.).

    I feel like those objectives have so far been, in part, achieved.

  2. It was not my intent to promote any particular provider over another, other than by the passive inclusion of advertised product characteristics/features.

  3. The last thing I want is a vendor war. And I suspect TMC authorities would not tolerate that, either.

  4. I have already admitted to inherent biases--e.g., favoring genuine Tesla charging products. However if my opinion counts for anything, in this thread references to all products and companies are welcome.

  5. Going forward, I'd prefer that no one (including me) disparages any particular company or business. At the same time, if reviews of and comments about products are provided (which I hope they are), it is probably good practice to make clear the author's relationship to the company in question, if any. I believe TMC prohibits self-serving posts by vendor representatives, unless under a vendor membership and identified as such, correct?

  6. At this point I have no intention of removing reference to any vendor/manufacturer. However, I will be glad to add any new sources, and to fix or update any published information, as necessary.
The fact that people are enthusiastic about CCS1 adapters--as evidenced on several TMC threads--should tell drivers and manufacturers just how important access to good, fast DC charging is. IMO, the sooner average electric car range can be increased (e.g., to 400-500 miles) and average full charging speed lowered (say down to ~5-10- minutes), the better.

Disclosure: I am not on the payroll and/or receiving benefits from any company, business, manufacturer, or individual. In fact, I have so far gone out of my way not to accept free Tesla-related (test) products. (That said, I would totally accept a free new Tesla roadster to test drive. I'm not crazy.)

Roadster.jpg



*****

To Help Put Things Into Perspective: A Really Brief History of CCS1 Adapters
  • 2012 -- Large automakers planning for electric car sales introduce 'Combined Charging System' standards (CCS1 in North America and Japan; CCS2 elsewhere). (Ostracized by this group, young company Tesla goes off on its own and develops the elegant Tesla Proprietary Connector system of plugs and ports.)

  • 2016 -- As partial penance for its prior emissions scandal, Volkswagen creates the Electrify America charging system of CCS1 equipment in North America. Other third-party charge providers follow suit. By the 2020s virtually all non-Tesla electric cars in North America use the CCS1 DC charging standard.

  • 2020 -- Unbeknownst to most customers, Tesla begins building CCS capability into new Tesla automobiles. (This trend is interrupted for a few months in 2021 due to the 'chip shortage.')

  • 2020 -- EVHub* in Ukraine develops a CCS1 adapter that is eventually for sale to North American customers.

  • 2020 -- SETEC offers a Tesla CCS1 adapter that mimics CHAdeMO technology (and hence does not require internal CCS capability).

  • 2021 -- Tesla releases its CCS1 adapter for Models 3 & Y in South Korea only. (Tesla hints that the adapter will be released in North America "soon.")

  • 2022 -- Sensing a business opportunity, Korean shopping/exporting companies (like Harumio) begin buying and shipping Korean Tesla CCS1 adapters to North America customers.

  • 2022 -- After just a few months, Tesla clamps down on the Korea-North America Tesla CCS1 adapter market.

  • 2022 -- Several new sources of Tesla, Tesla-like, and aftermarket CCS1 adapters appear online.
_____
* EVHub may(?) have officially offered the first aftermarket CCS1 adapter. Unclear. However, the SETEC adapter (apparently released somewhat later in 2020?) appears to have become more widely known more quickly.
 
Last edited:

JulesVerne

Model Y Owner - since Aug 14, 2021
Jun 6, 2021
106
90
Toronto
Ordered adapter from Harumio last week (Thurs $309usd incl shipping..gave userid and passwd). Got invoice from Tesla Korea showing it was ordered in my name. This a.m. (Wed just after midnight) got email from Tesla Korea saying order cancelled. Right then, 1am, looked at Soom Lab Korea thinking, once I get email from Harumio and money back, I'll try them.. price was $309 usd like Harumi. At 9am got email and money back from Harumio. After email from Harumio came , i checked Soom again, the Soom price was now $350 usd incl shipping..TOO MUCH)
Guess I got caught by Tesla Korea checking my VIN. Oh well. Heres hoping for North America CCS 1 release.
 
Last edited:
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My PPF guy loaned me his aftermarket CCS1 adapter last week which is almost a look-alike of the Harumio adapter linked in the OP. He doesn’t want to tell me what brand and pricing it has, but just wanted me to test it if it “works” as he plan on selling it soon, due to the absence of the OEM Tesla CCS1 adapter in the market.

So I went to this newly-opened Porsche dealership that has a L3 Supercharger with a CCS1 plug - perfect! With a 28% SOC it began pulling close to 150kW and up to 365A! It just took 27 minutes and three seconds before I reached my 80% charge limit. I was anxious at first using a 3rd-party adapter with my bnew Tesla but common sense dictates it should be good as it doesn’t feel like a flimsy product - it is very hefty and looks like a well-designed product. The CCS1 adapter didn’t even felt warm in any stage of the charging so I’m pretty confident to recommend this to my friends.

Here’s some photos that I took.
 
Ordered adapter from Harumio last week (Thurs $309usd incl shipping..gave userid and passwd). Got invoice from Tesla Korea showing it was ordered in my name. This a.m. (Wed just after midnight) got email from Tesla Korea saying order cancelled. Right then, 1am, looked at Soom Lab Korea thinking, once I get email from Harumio and money back, I'll try them.. price was $309 usd like Harumi. At 9am got email and money back from Harumio. After email from Harumio came , i checked Soom again, the Soom price was now $350 usd incl shipping..TOO MUCH)
Guess I got caught by Tesla Korea checking my VIN. Oh well. Heres hoping for North America CCS 1 release.
Oh yes, it stated $319 when I checked this morning, it looks like they just raised their price. No guarantee it works though and definitely not for $350.
 
I went ahead and put an order in, at that teslaccsadapter.com site. I know - probably overpaid by $200. Once I get hands on, I'll post how it turned out and if I will keep it or not. They do have a return policy, and I also used Amex, so I think I could always return it and have Amex fight for any money due back. Also, they add an extra year warranty on top of any manufacturer's warranty.
 

tps5352

Active Member
Supporting Member
I went ahead and put an order in, at that teslaccsadapter.com site. I know - probably overpaid by $200. Once I get hands on, I'll post how it turned out and if I will keep it or not. They do have a return policy, and I also used Amex, so I think I could always return it and have Amex fight for any money due back. Also, they add an extra year warranty on top of any manufacturer's warranty.

An eventual team comparison of the products from the four sources claiming to offer Tesla or Tesla-like CCS1 adapters (not counting Tesla itself) would be illuminating. Any more information on the Hawaii source? Someone was going to visit the physical location and check it out.
 
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Hiline

Member
Supporting Member
Apr 16, 2022
820
1,603
Los Angeles
It’s pretty clear all of these products are going to work initially. I’m sure they have been tested by the manufacturer; otherwise they wouldn’t be sold for a few hundred apiece. If they don’t work you can simply ask for a refund.
As for how long they last, we won’t know for sure, potentially for years.
 
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bradtem

Robocar consultant
Dec 18, 2018
935
1,069
Sunnyvale, CA
At this point it almost seems it would be worth getting a group of people together to buy the Huizhou Olink adpater for $139 (plus a share of shipping and distribution, so probably more like $180.) Then wait for Tesla to sell the genuine one for $200 and resell the Chinese one for $100 so you only paid $80 for the ability to have it now rather than whenever Tesla starts selling.
 

tps5352

Active Member
Supporting Member
At this point it almost seems it would be worth getting a group of people together to buy the Huizhou Olink adpater for $139 (plus a share of shipping and distribution, so probably more like $180.) Then wait for Tesla to sell the genuine one for $200 and resell the Chinese one for $100 so you only paid $80 for the ability to have it now rather than whenever Tesla starts selling.

Interesting. When I was putting together my list (Post #1) I saw WLLink (Do I have that right?) adapters for sale on eBay. (Like this one.) For various reasons I choose not to include any eBay adapters in my table. But as the OEM Tesla adapter market dries up, the number of aftermarket CCS1 adapters seems to be increasing. Prices can be (not surprising, for eBay) high.

Here's something I'd like to know. Was the EVHub CCS1 adapter designed and built solely in Ukraine in 2020 (which is what I originally assumed), or was it designed in Ukraine (or somewhere else) but manufactured in China? Following up on this line of questioning, how similar are today's Chinese-made aftermarket adapters to the original EVHub model?

Lastly, how similar are the spate of new Tesla CCS1 adapter clones to the actual Tesla-Korea adapter?
 
Interesting. When I was putting together my list (Post #1) I saw WLLink (Do I have that right?) adapters for sale on eBay. (Like this one.) For various reasons I choose not to include any eBay adapters in my table. But as the OEM Tesla adapter market dries up, the number of aftermarket CCS1 adapters seems to be increasing. Prices can be (not surprising, for eBay) high.

Here's something I'd like to know. Was the EVHub CCS1 adapter designed and built solely in Ukraine in 2020 (which is what I originally assumed), or was it designed in Ukraine (or somewhere else) but manufactured in China? Following up on this line of questioning, how similar are today's Chinese-made aftermarket adapters to the original EVHub model?

Lastly, how similar are the spate of new Tesla CCS1 adapter clones to the actual Tesla-Korea adapter?
At this point it almost seems it would be worth getting a group of people together to buy the Huizhou Olink adpater for $139 (plus a share of shipping and distribution, so probably more like $180.) Then wait for Tesla to sell the genuine one for $200 and resell the Chinese one for $100 so you only paid $80 for the ability to have it now rather than whenever Tesla starts selling.
I have family member who knows someone who works at Tesla, an engineer. The reason Tesla stopped CCS adapter coming from South Korea to North America is because they are finally releasing the official adapter in december of this year. Apparently preorders are starting soon (maybe september?). That’s what I heard from a legit source. God knows if it’s true but it comes from a Tesla employee, I wouldn’t see why he would lie
 

srs5694

Active Member
Jan 15, 2019
1,622
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Woonsocket, RI
Here's something I'd like to know. Was the EVHub CCS1 adapter designed and built solely in Ukraine in 2020 (which is what I originally assumed), or was it designed in Ukraine (or somewhere else) but manufactured in China? Following up on this line of questioning, how similar are today's Chinese-made aftermarket adapters to the original EVHub model?
I haven't seen either adapter in person, but there are differences between them, based on the photos. I've posted about this in other threads, as in this post, where I wrote:
srs5694 said:
The EVHUB product has a latch that extends above the main body, whereas the A2Z's design is not like this; the A2Z's main body is taller. Also, the J1772 portion of the CCS connector is flush in the A2Z design, whereas the center portion extends out from the edges in the EVHUB design. Without tearing one apart or putting it through a series of X-rays or some other imaging tool, there's no way to judge how the internals are built. I'd expect them to be similar in layout, but maybe with some subtle differences; they're basically connecting equivalent pins on the two connectors, so there's not much room for creativity on wiring layout.
The general belief has been that the EVHUB adapter was designed and manufactured in Ukraine, and that the war there is what's disrupted its manufacture and therefore availability. I may have missed it, but I don't see anything on the products Web page that explicitly addresses this issue, but if it had been coming from an Asian manufacturer, it seems likely that they'd have found a way to keep the supply flowing to the US (the primary market for such an adapter), bypassing the war in Ukraine and perhaps even lowering costs (because there'd be less shipping involved). Because the A2Z and other similar adapters are different from the EVHUB adapter, I don't believe those are evidence of such an alternative distribution method; I believe they're different products.
 

KJD

OD 7/27 MYLR Red/Black 19's/ No FSD/ Del 11/20
Supporting Member
Dec 14, 2013
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1,580
SLC, UT
I have family member who knows someone who works at Tesla, an engineer. The reason Tesla stopped CCS adapter coming from South Korea to North America is because they are finally releasing the official adapter in december of this year. Apparently preorders are starting soon (maybe september?). That’s what I heard from a legit source. God knows if it’s true but it comes from a Tesla employee, I wouldn’t see why he would lie
That actually sounds pretty reasonable and I have no reason to doubt it might happen.

I would also note that it was back in October of 2021 that Tesla said the adapter was coming "soon". Count me as cynical at this point.

https://teslamotorsclub.com/tmc/thr...n-ccs-adaptor-“soon”-in-north-america.243910/
 
Here's something I'd like to know. Was the EVHub CCS1 adapter designed and built solely in Ukraine in 2020 (which is what I originally assumed), or was it designed in Ukraine (or somewhere else) but manufactured in China? Following up on this line of questioning, how similar are today's Chinese-made aftermarket adapters to the original EVHub model?

The general belief has been that the EVHUB adapter was designed and manufactured in Ukraine, and that the war there is what's disrupted its manufacture and therefore availability. I may have missed it, but I don't see anything on the products Web page that explicitly addresses this issue, but if it had been coming from an Asian manufacturer, it seems likely that they'd have found a way to keep the supply flowing to the US (the primary market for such an adapter), bypassing the war in Ukraine and perhaps even lowering costs (because there'd be less shipping involved). Because the A2Z and other similar adapters are different from the EVHUB adapter, I don't believe those are evidence of such an alternative distribution method; I believe they're different products.
I believe @AlexUA is part of the EVHub team, and had mentioned that manufacturing was primarily "insourced" in Kyiv, with suppliers in Kharkiv and general war disruption being the main reason production for export had to stop.
 
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