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New supercharger pricing

Bob M

Member
Feb 12, 2019
86
42
Antioch ca
All the above is the reason I bought a large and efficient solar panel system about 3 years ago. It zeroed out my electric bill including charging my old Volt (just swapped for a M3) so I saved $200 per month in gasoline plus $270 /mo in electricity. My payback on the solar system is less that 4 years. I always felt like a victim to both the energy giants, the oil companies and the privately owned utilities. The SMUD long battle to get back Sacramento’s grid system still resulted in 75% lower rates than PG & E for Sacramento people. The final expose on the first gasoline shortages along with the long bedmate relationship of the puc and PGE also pushed me in that direction. I still haven’t figured out what I should do in adding storage when net metering goes away. Electricity rates have now gone up so quickly.
 
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Bob M

Member
Feb 12, 2019
86
42
Antioch ca
All the above is the reason I bought a large and efficient solar panel system about 3 years ago. It zeroed out my electric bill including charging my old Volt (just swapped for a M3) so I saved $200 per month in gasoline plus $270 /mo in electricity. My payback on the solar system is less that 4 years. I always felt like a victim to both the energy giants, the oil companies and the privately owned utilities. The SMUD long battle to get back Sacramento’s grid system still resulted in 75% lower rates than PG & E for Sacramento people. The final expose on the first gasoline shortages along with the long bedmate relationship of the puc and PGE also pushed me in that direction. I still haven’t figured out what I should do in adding storage when net metering goes away. Electricity rates have now gone up so quickly.
 

Bob M

Member
Feb 12, 2019
86
42
Antioch ca
All the above is the reason I bought a large and efficient solar panel system about 3 years ago. It zeroed out my electric bill including charging my old Volt (just swapped for a M3) so I saved $200 per month in gasoline plus $270 /mo in electricity. My payback on the solar system is less that 4 years. I always felt like a victim to both the energy giants, the oil companies and the privately owned utilities. The SMUD long battle to get back Sacramento’s grid system still resulted in 25% lower rates than PG & E for Sacramento people. The final expose on the first gasoline shortages along with the long bedmate relationship of the puc and PGE also pushed me in that direction. I still haven’t figured out what I should do in adding storage when net metering goes away. Electricity rates have now gone up so quickly.
 

jsmay311

Active Member
Apr 22, 2016
1,194
1,763
Chicago suburbs
Can anyone point me to a site that has a list of which states do Supercharger billing by the kWh and which do billing by the minute?

It used to be listed on Tesla.com's main Supercharger page, but no longer.

The best I could find is this old pricing map at Teslanomics.co. The prices are all old/wrong, but I guess at least you can see which states have tiered pricing (and therefore bill by the minute) and which don't (and therefore bill by the kWh). And I suppose I could go in my car and look at the map on the screen, but c'mon, this should be listed online somewhere.

(Side note: All of the Supercharger location details on Tesla's own website still haven't been updated to show the latest maximum power available. They all say "up to 120kW", even tho most (as I understand it) can now deliver 145kW, at least to Model 3 LR's.)
 

Dan203

Active Member
Jul 10, 2019
1,420
1,022
Northern Nevada
Even with a high rate of $0.33/kWh it would only cost about $25 to fill 0-100% a current M3 long range. A BMW 3 series with a 15 gallon tank, using the national average of $2.71/gallon, would cost about $40 to fill up. And if you used Premium (like you're suppose to) it's more like $50. So supercharging is still cheaper than gas.

Now if you depend on supercharging every day it could still get expensive, but you shouldn't be doing that anyway. It defeats the point.
 

Rocky_H

Well-Known Member
Feb 19, 2015
6,765
8,356
Boise, ID
Can anyone point me to a site that has a list of which states do Supercharger billing by the kWh and which do billing by the minute?

It used to be listed on Tesla.com's main Supercharger page, but no longer.

The best I could find is this old pricing map at Teslanomics.co. The prices are all old/wrong, but I guess at least you can see which states have tiered pricing (and therefore bill by the minute) and which don't (and therefore bill by the kWh). And I suppose I could go in my car and look at the map on the screen, but c'mon, this should be listed online somewhere.
I've used this page (or similar) a few times. Blink network has this same issue just like any charging network company.
https://www.blinkcharging.com/ev-charging-fee

They list their pricing per kWh for 15 states plus Washington D.C. And then they list their rate per 30 seconds of charging session for all other states not listed.
 

FlatSix911

Porsche 918 Hybrid
Jun 15, 2015
6,932
6,877
Silicon Valley
Interesting comparison of charging options... https://electrek.co/2019/08/12/kwh-pricing-ev-drivers-miss-benefits/

There are four major players in public EV charging in the US, with three different business models, but only Tesla has a stated preference for kWh pricing, which they list at $0.28 per kWh in the United States (but this seems to be a maximum, with some states paying less.

The other three leading networks are Chargepoint, EVgo, and Electrify America, which all offer direct-current fast-charging (“DCFC”) stations with CCS / Chademo type connectors...
 
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CaryRx

Member
Jul 27, 2019
58
37
Antioch, CA
If I use 31 ct as a basis, I saved $15k using superchargers so far. Tesla probably hates me LOL

I will be driving my 2013 Model S 85 with free SC until there's nothing left of it to drive. I charge at home too (Solar roof with 4000 KWh extra/year for EV) but I use the daylights out of my free SC and have no qualms about it.
 
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Phlier

Bluebird
Jun 12, 2019
1,875
3,233
Utah
I will be driving my 2013 Model S 85 with free SC until there's nothing left of it to drive. I charge at home too (Solar roof with 4000 KWh extra/year for EV) but I use the daylights out of my free SC and have no qualms about it.
Sorry to go OT, but man... the body style of the older Model S is just beautiful. Today's S's are OK, but the older ones are just jaw dropping.
 

EVDRVN

Active Member
May 12, 2018
1,480
2,213
North Bay Area
Even with a high rate of $0.33/kWh it would only cost about $25 to fill 0-100% a current M3 long range. A BMW 3 series with a 15 gallon tank, using the national average of $2.71/gallon, would cost about $40 to fill up. And if you used Premium (like you're suppose to) it's more like $50. So supercharging is still cheaper than gas.

Now if you depend on supercharging every day it could still get expensive, but you shouldn't be doing that anyway. It defeats the point.

PGE rates can be far higher than that and are only going up.
 

Dan203

Active Member
Jul 10, 2019
1,420
1,022
Northern Nevada
PGE rates can be far higher than that and are only going up.

But with companies like PGE they have tiered pricing right? So really only an issue if you happen to charge during peak rates. I don’t know what the peak hours are in PGE territory but here they're like 1-6pm mon-fri in the summer and 5-10pm mon-fri in the winter. So plenty of off peak hours for them to lower the average with. And if they use solar and batteries then that comes down even more.
 

EVDRVN

Active Member
May 12, 2018
1,480
2,213
North Bay Area
But with companies like PGE they have tiered pricing right? So really only an issue if you happen to charge during peak rates. I don’t know what the peak hours are in PGE territory but here they're like 1-6pm mon-fri in the summer and 5-10pm mon-fri in the winter. So plenty of off peak hours for them to lower the average with. And if they use solar and batteries then that comes down even more.

Tiers have nothing to do with time, that TOU. Tier one is gone unless you live in the dark. If you own an average size home here you can easily get in higher tiers no matter what time you charge. i have solar and with my bill runs a credit and I am on an old very favorable plan that will expire soon. If I do EV charging I can be above SC rates. Solar is also a substantial investment as well. PGE is a total joke for rates and each year gets worse and worse.
 

Phlier

Bluebird
Jun 12, 2019
1,875
3,233
Utah
One advantage to living in my small town... we pay $0.06 per Kwh regardless of the time of day. It's so cheap that I just can't justify adding solar/powerwall.

My first experience with a Supercharger was a bit shocking... 8 bucks. It was the $0.27/Kwh rate that the Tesla Supercharger web page shows.

We really need to have a bigger Supercharger here, with more convenient access to Interstate 15, as we are a main stop along I-15 between Las Vegas and Salt Lake City. The Supercharger here is always at least half full. If you were to pull up the Supercharger for St. George, Utah right now, I'd bet it shows that at least half of them are in use. It's located clear across town from I-15, and turn-by-turn navigation seems to have a problem getting you right to it.

So far, I've resisted the urge to just go hang out at the Supercharger so I could talk to people about their cars, 'cause that would be weird, right? ;)

I wonder if Tesla would consider allowing private Supercharger station ownership? I'd love to put up a small convenience store with a 20 stall Supercharger right next to the Interstate off/on ramp. Maybe add a few CHAdeMO slots, CCS, etc.
 

Marrus

Member
May 19, 2018
93
38
FL
Even with a high rate of $0.33/kWh it would only cost about $25 to fill 0-100% a current M3 long range. A BMW 3 series with a 15 gallon tank, using the national average of $2.71/gallon, would cost about $40 to fill up. And if you used Premium (like you're suppose to) it's more like $50. So supercharging is still cheaper than gas.

Now if you depend on supercharging every day it could still get expensive, but you shouldn't be doing that anyway. It defeats the point.
Since you compared cost to fill up it’s important to dive a bit deeper, keep in mind that a new BMW 330 will get around it’s rated 36 mpg on the highway, you figured 15 gallons so that works out to 540 miles. To only drive 315 miles at that economy works out to $23.71 if you pay the average $2.71. That’s cheaper per mile to drive than driving electric when charged at a SuperCharger. My new over 6000 lbs GVW 2019 AWD X5 gets 26 mpg on the highway. Bmw cars are one of the few cars that actually pull off the EPA rated estimates. My daughters both have BMW’s and I track their average mpg and they both beat the EPA ratings, one of them by a considerable amount. FYI we never use premium fuel and they perform absolutely fine, if we were looking for absolutely max performance the premium would be better but everyday driving doesn’t require it. We have 3 Teslas and we never hit the rated range, we have free Supercharging, 33 cents per kWh is not a bargain
 
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